6

I think i might be dreaming, but i think i read somewhere that you can validate the type of an attribute of an object before you save it? Something like validates :transaction_date, :type => Date and that will make sure that its a date?

Is this possible in Rails 3.2? i am trying to find evidence of this on the net. i have already looked here at the rails api and i am going through the ActiveRecord support.

1
6

Rails doesn't support this directly; the closest it comes is probably validates_format_of, or supplying your own custom validator.

I think what you want is the validates_timeliness gem. It not only validates that something is a valid date, but you can specify whether it should be before or after today and various other date range checks.

1
  • We use validates_timeliness and it works very well for our purposes. +1 – Carlos Drew Sep 16 '13 at 17:31
17

As a complement to the other answers, note that you can define a custom validator to let you use exactly the syntax you proposed:

validates :transaction_date, :type => Date

as follows:

class TypeValidator < ActiveModel::EachValidator
  def validate_each(record, attribute, value)
    record.errors.add attribute, (options[:message] || "is not of class #{options[:with]}") unless
      value.class == options[:with]
  end
end

Of course, if you want to allow subclasses, you could change the test to use kind_of?.

1
  • Very clean, should be in Rails by default. – fgblomqvist May 7 '19 at 18:48
2

You can use following gem:

https://github.com/codegram/date_validator

It contains a date validator. You can add a few options.

1

A new gem has been created to help validate types in rails and an explanatory blog post exists to answer more of the "why" it was created in the first place.

With this library your code would simple be:

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base
  validates_type :transaction_date, :date
end

This will throw an exception when anything except a a Date is assigned to :transaction_date.

0

Here's another custom validator that uses is_a? instead of class, and therefore is a bit less strict and handles things such as Numeric:

class IsAValidator < ActiveModel::EachValidator
  def validate_each(record, attribute, value)
    record.errors.add attribute, (options[:message] || "is not a #{options[:with]}") unless
      value.is_a?(options[:with])
  end
end

Usage:

validates :number, is_a: Numeric

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