-1

I'm new to WPF, so there's probably something basic I'm missing here. I have an application that looks like this:

<Window x:Class="MyApp.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="Test Application" Height="647" Width="723" Background="#88B0FF">

    <DockPanel Name="MainDock">
        <Button DockPanel.Dock="Top" Margin="5,0,5,0" x:Name="PingButton" Click="PingButton_OnClick">Ping</Button>
        <TextBox Text="{Binding Path=Output}" />
    </DockPanel>
</Window>

The code-behind is like this:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    private Model _applicationModel = new Model();
    public Model ApplicationModel {
        get { return _applicationModel; }
        set { _applicationModel = value; }
    }

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        this.DataContext = ApplicationModel;
        ApplicationModel.Output = "Not clicked";
    }

    private void PingButton_OnClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        ApplicationModel.Output = "Clicked";
    }
}

I have a small class called Model that implements INotifyPropertyChanged.

public class Model : INotifyPropertyChanged
{

    public string Output { get; set; }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    [NotifyPropertyChangedInvocator]
    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}

I run this application, and the text box displays the text "Not clicked". When I click the button, I would expect that the text would change. It does not. The "ApplicationModel" object is updated, and this is reflected in the DataContext; I have a breakpoint in the OnPropertyChanged() method, however, and it appears that it's never being called.

What am I doing wrong?

4

OnPropertyChanged() isn't being called because you're not calling it. There is no special magic that wires up calls to OnPropertyChanged by itself, so you need to do it yourself.

Specifically, you should modify your Output property to call it when it changes (and it wouldn't hurt to do the same for your ApplicationModel property:

private string output;
public string Output
{
    get { return output; }
    set
    {
        if (output != value)
        {
            output = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("Output");
        }
    }
}

If you're targeting .NET 4.5 you can utilize the CallerMemberName attribute to reduce boilerplate code; This article explains how to do so. Then you'll have something like this:

private string output;
public string Output
{
    get { return output; }
    set { SetProperty(ref output, value); }
}

If you're using .NET 4.0 or below, you can use expression trees, as described in this answer.

  • Bah, I was hoping for some reflection magic here. Any best practices for reducing the boilerplate here? – Keith Ripley Sep 16 '13 at 19:10
  • @KeithRipley See my updated answer – Adi Lester Sep 16 '13 at 19:16
  • I saw, that definitely works for me. :-) – Keith Ripley Sep 16 '13 at 19:21
  • Not a fan of [CallerMemberName] because it won't work if you need to notify a different property than what's being called. Code will end up being a mix between both ways. – Shoe Sep 16 '13 at 21:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.