5

I'm learning SQL and had a hard time understanding the following recursive SQL statement.

WITH RECURSIVE t(n) AS (
    SELECT 1
    UNION ALL
    SELECT n+1 FROM t WHERE n < 100
)
SELECT sum(n) FROM t;

What is n and t from SELECT sum(n) FROM t;? As far as I could understand, n is a number of t is a set. Am I right?

Also how is recursion triggered in this statement?

6
  • 1
    It is not. MySQL does not support with or recursion. What database are you thinking of? Sep 17, 2013 at 3:51
  • 1
    The WITH RECURSIVE syntax isn't supported by MySQL, so I've broadened the question a bit to avoid that issue. (It is supported by various other databases.)
    – user149341
    Sep 17, 2013 at 3:53
  • 1
    t is a table, and n is a column of that table. It uses a CTE (Common Table Expression) to create recursion. Basically, it starts with 1 (the first select in the UNION), then for every iteration, it selects the last result + 1, until n equals 100 (the second part of the UNION). Then, the last SELECT (outside the CTE) sums all the results. Don't be fooled that this example, the table is called RECURSIVE, there is no magic there. It's just the name.
    – bhamby
    Sep 17, 2013 at 3:56
  • @GordonLinoff Thanks for pointing out that issue. It should be in PostgreSQL, not MySQL. I made a mistake.
    – whileone
    Sep 17, 2013 at 4:10
  • @bhamby: the "table" in that example is called t. recursive is a keyword required by the SQL standard for recursive CTEs. Microsoft however chose to ignore that requirement and makes using it an error.
    – user330315
    Sep 17, 2013 at 5:49

3 Answers 3

5

The syntax that you are using looks like Postgres. "Recursion" in SQL is not really recursion, it is iteration. Your statement is:

WITH RECURSIVE t(n) AS (
    SELECT 1
    UNION ALL
    SELECT n+1 FROM t WHERE n < 100
)
SELECT sum(n) FROM t;

The statement for t is evaluated as:

  1. Evaluate the non-self-referring part (select 1).
  2. Then evaluate the self-referring part. (Initially this gives 2.)
  3. Then evaluation the self-referring part again. (3).
  4. And so on while the condition is still valid (n < 100).

When this is done the t subquery is finished, and the final statement can be evaluated.

2

This is called a Common Table Expression, or CTE.

The RECURSIVE from the query doesn't mean anything: it's just another name like n or t. What makes things recursive is that the CTE named t references itself inside the expression. To produce the result of the expression, the query engine must therefore recursively build the result, where each evaluation triggers the next. It reaches this point: SELECT n+1 FROM t... and has to stop and evaluate t. To do that, it has to call itself again, and so on, until the condition (n < 100) no longer holds. The SELECT 1 provides a starting point, and the WHERE n < 100 makes it so that the query does not recur forever.

At least, that's how it's supposed to work conceptually. What generally really happens is that the query engine builds the result iteratively, rather than recursively, if it can, but that's another story.

1
  • 2
    The recursive does mean something (and it's not "another name"). It is required by the SQL standard if you want to have a "recursive" CTE. For regular (non-recursive) CTEs you must leave out that keyword.
    – user330315
    Sep 17, 2013 at 5:51
2

Let's break this apart:

WITH RECURSIVE t(n) AS (

A Common Table Expression (CTE) which is supposed to include a seed query and a recursive query. CTE is called t and returns 1 column: n

The seed query:

    SELECT 1

returns ans answer set (in this case a just a single row: 1) and puts a copy of it into the final answer set

Now starts the recursive part:

    UNION ALL

The rows returned from the seed query are now processed and n+1 is returned (again a single row answer set: 2) and copied into the final answer set:

    SELECT n+1 FROM t WHERE n < 100

If this step returned a non-empty answer set (activity_count > 0) it's repeated (forever).

A WHERE-condition on a calculation like this n+1 is usually used to avoid an endless recursion. One usually knows the maximum possible level based on the data and for complex queries it's too easy to put some conditions wrong ;-)

Finally the answer set is returned:

)
SELECT sum(n) FROM t;

When you simply do a SELECT * FROM t; you'll see all numbers from 1 to 100, it's not a very efficient way to produce this list.

The most important thing to remember is that each step produces a part of the final result and only those rows from the previous step are processed in the next recursion level.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.