53

C++11 introduced the std::atomic<> template library. The standard specifies the store() and load() operations to atomically set / get a variable shared by more than one thread.

My question is are assignment and access operations also atomic?

Namely, is:

std::atomic<bool> stop(false);
...
void thread_1_run_until_stopped()
{
    if(!stop.load())
        /* do stuff */
}

void thread_2_set_stop()
{        
    stop.store(true);
}

Equivalent to:

void thread_1_run_until_stopped()
{
    if(!stop)
        /* do stuff */
}

void thread_2_set_stop()
{        
    stop = true;
}
  • stop.load(std::memory_order_relaxed) and stop.store(true, std::memory_order_relaxed); should be fine here, as Serge says. You just need the store to be seen promptly, and relaxed still guarantees that. You only need a stronger ordering if you need to synchronize other data. – Peter Cordes Sep 2 '17 at 7:57
45

Are assignment and access operations for non-reference types also atomic?

Yes, they are. atomic<T>::operator T and atomic<T>::operator= are equivalent to atomic<T>::load and atomic<T>::store respectively. All the operators are implemented in the atomic class such that they will use atomic operations as you would expect.

I'm not sure what you mean about "non-reference" types? Not sure how reference types are relevant here.

| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Equivalent to the versions of load and store without a consistency control parameter, that is. – Ben Voigt Sep 17 '13 at 13:56
  • 1
    @user1131467 - thanks. Removed the 'reference', well, reference ;-) – bavaza Sep 17 '13 at 14:20
  • 1
    @BenVoigt All it means is that the most stringent memory order is used: std::memory_order_seq_cst. This prevents one from shooting oneself in the foot, but is possibly a premature pessimization. – Unslander Monica Aug 6 '14 at 0:52
21

You can do both, but the advantage of load()/store() is that they allow to specify memory order. It is important sometimes for performance, where you can specify std::memory_order_relaxed while atomic<T>::operator T and atomic<T>::operator= would use the most safe and slow std::memory_order_seq_cst. Sometimes it is important for correctness and readability of your code: although the default std::memory_order_seq_cst is most safe thus most likely to be correct, it is not immediately clear for the reader what kind of operation (acquire/release/consume) you are doing, or whether you are doing such operation at all (to answer: isn't relaxed order sufficient here?).

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.