20

I have a multi-module maven project which contains nested some other reactor submodules. As result I have a 3 level hierarchy of modules.

In the past I refactored the hierachy, moving some nested modules from one to another. I modified as well the names of some of the modules.

On Jenkins, the old modules - now unexistent - appear in the build report as "didn't run". When I do locally a maven install these modules don't appear in the reactor summary.

Is this behavior somehow expected? I mean, are there any setting in jenkins which makes the reactor runner remember old sub-modules?

The "Delete workspace before build starts" option is enabled.

17

Have you tried the action Delete All Disabled Modules available between Configure and Modules on the project page ?

4
  • No, I haven't, but it's obvious it's the right answer. I didn't know that action. It seems it's not visible for all project users - some privileges which I don't have are required. link – diegomtassis Sep 19 '13 at 7:48
  • 6
    What if that action does not appear on the page? – Amedee Van Gasse Jan 26 '16 at 10:18
  • 4
    I also do not have that option. Anyone know how to enable it? – bobanahalf Jul 20 '16 at 20:12
  • 1
    Does this option still exists? These are not Disabled Modules they are deleted modules. This is a case of cache invalidation failure. Moving away from this plugin to a freestyle build. – TimP Apr 24 '17 at 15:15
22

If, for some reason, Delete All Disabled Modules is not available, then you can run this Groovy script in Manage Jenkins -> Script Console (https://<JENKINS_URL>/script). Based upon a script I found on the Jenkins Jira and improved with feedback here on Stack Overflow.

import jenkins.model.Jenkins
import hudson.maven.MavenModuleSet
import hudson.model.Result

Jenkins.instance
    .getAllItems(Job.class)
    .findAll({ job -> job instanceof MavenModuleSet })
    .each {
  job ->
    build = job.getLastBuild()
    if (build && build.getResult() == Result.SUCCESS) {
      println("==> Processing job " + job.name)
      build.getModuleBuilds().each {
        module, build ->
          if (build.isEmpty()) {
            //module.delete()
            println("  --> Deleted module " + module.name)
          }
      }
    } else {
      println("Warning: Skipped job " + job.name + " because its last build failed.")
    }
}

return null

How to use:

  1. Run the script first without any edits (it's safe, really!).
  2. Go through the list of changes to check for unwanted deletes.
  3. Uncomment module.delete().
  4. Run the (edited) script again.

Side effect: any archived builds that still had that module in the past, will no longer have the deleted module. In my use case this was acceptable.

3
  • 1
    oh nooooooooo it deleted my modul "someModuleYouNoLongerWant" on the first run ;) – Martin Dürrmeier Feb 19 '19 at 16:31
  • That's what you get when you run some random code from Stack Overflow! :-p Additionally, it installed a virus that can only be removed by sacrificing your firstborn. :-D – Amedee Van Gasse Feb 20 '19 at 9:33
  • small improvement: if you have Jenkins jobs in folders, change "items" to "getAllItems(Job.class)" to get all jobs, not just the ones at the "top" level. – Tom De Leu Jan 21 '20 at 8:41
6

Here is a script that will walk over all maven jobs and delete all modules that didn't run on the last successful build.

import jenkins.model.Jenkins
import hudson.maven.MavenModuleSet
import hudson.model.Result

Jenkins.instance.items.findAll({job -> job instanceof MavenModuleSet}).each {
  job ->
    build = job.getLastBuild()
    if(build && build.getResult() == Result.SUCCESS) {
      println("==> Processing job " + job.name)
      build.getModuleBuilds().each {
        module, build ->
          if(build.isEmpty()) {
            //module.delete()
            println("    --> Deleted module " + module.name)
          }
      }
    } else {
      println("Warning: Skipped job " + job.name + " because its last build failed.")
    }
}

return null

How to use:

  • Run it without edits
  • Go through the list of changes to check for unwanted deletes
  • Uncomment module.delete() and run it again
1
  • Thanks! Perfect. This saved a lot of work compared to other solutions. – Håvard Nov 2 '19 at 15:43

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