What's the simplest, library-free code for implementing array intersections in javascript? I want to write

intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5])

and get

[2, 3]
  • 13
    Do you want simple or fast? – SLaks Dec 11 '09 at 3:07
  • 9
    Priority is simple, but it can't be so brain-dead that it will be a performance hog :) – Peter Dec 11 '09 at 3:08
  • 2
    I have made a JsFiddle Banchmark test page for all the methods here, including the _underscore intersection function. (higher is better) !enter image description here Till now intersect_safe gave the best results. YOU & Underscore the worst. – neoswf Aug 22 '12 at 13:39
  • Adding a break to Simple js loops increases the ops/sec to ~10M – Richard Aug 30 '12 at 16:17
  • 17
    In case you miss it : the simplest answer is not the accepted one but the one in the bottom : stackoverflow.com/questions/1885557/… – redben Aug 17 '14 at 14:42

36 Answers 36

up vote 762 down vote accepted

Use a combination of Array.prototype.filter and Array.prototype.indexOf:

array1.filter(value => -1 !== array2.indexOf(value));
  • 9
    Which you can solve by adding a library version on array's prototype. – Anon. Dec 11 '09 at 11:48
  • 11
    Yes, but it was worth mentioning. – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 14:23
  • 16
    Best answer here, both for simplicity and working with non-numbers – Muhd Aug 10 '13 at 0:43
  • 23
    intersection([1,2,1,1,3], [1]) returns [1, 1, 1]. Shouldn't it return just [1]? – edjroot Jun 10 '16 at 10:35
  • 4
    Good catch. You will need a second filter. See the example here: stackoverflow.com/a/16227294/390519 (<-- at the end of that answer) – loneboat Jul 5 '16 at 23:56

Destructive seems simplest, especially if we can assume the input is sorted:

/* destructively finds the intersection of 
 * two arrays in a simple fashion.  
 *
 * PARAMS
 *  a - first array, must already be sorted
 *  b - second array, must already be sorted
 *
 * NOTES
 *  State of input arrays is undefined when
 *  the function returns.  They should be 
 *  (prolly) be dumped.
 *
 *  Should have O(n) operations, where n is 
 *    n = MIN(a.length, b.length)
 */
function intersection_destructive(a, b)
{
  var result = [];
  while( a.length > 0 && b.length > 0 )
  {  
     if      (a[0] < b[0] ){ a.shift(); }
     else if (a[0] > b[0] ){ b.shift(); }
     else /* they're equal */
     {
       result.push(a.shift());
       b.shift();
     }
  }

  return result;
}

Non-destructive has to be a hair more complicated, since we’ve got to track indices:

/* finds the intersection of 
 * two arrays in a simple fashion.  
 *
 * PARAMS
 *  a - first array, must already be sorted
 *  b - second array, must already be sorted
 *
 * NOTES
 *
 *  Should have O(n) operations, where n is 
 *    n = MIN(a.length(), b.length())
 */
function intersect_safe(a, b)
{
  var ai=0, bi=0;
  var result = [];

  while( ai < a.length && bi < b.length )
  {
     if      (a[ai] < b[bi] ){ ai++; }
     else if (a[ai] > b[bi] ){ bi++; }
     else /* they're equal */
     {
       result.push(a[ai]);
       ai++;
       bi++;
     }
  }

  return result;
}
  • 12
    There's numerous errors in intersect_safe: length is a property in Arrays, not a method. There's an undelared variable i in result.push(a[i]);. Finally, this simply doesn't work in the general case: two objects where neither is greater than the other according to the > operator are not necessarily equal. intersect_safe( [ {} ], [ {} ] ), for example, will give (once the previously mentioned errors are fixed) an array with one element, which is clearly wrong. – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 11:00
  • 4
    You can also use .slice(0) to create a clone of the array in intersect_safe, rather than tracking indexes. – johnluetke Sep 10 '11 at 23:42
  • 6
    @Asad: Look at the dates. My answer was 2009. The one you linked was in 2011. – atk Nov 30 '12 at 18:18
  • 6
    @Asad please be more careful with your not-so-subtle accusations of plagarism in the future. It is very insulting to be falsely accused. Especially when the original author – atk Dec 1 '12 at 2:57
  • 3
    @Asad: Apology accepted. And I fully agree with your underlying position :) – atk Dec 2 '12 at 18:37

If your environment supports ECMAScript 6 Set, one simple and supposedly efficient (see specification link) way:

function intersect(a, b) {
  var setA = new Set(a);
  var setB = new Set(b);
  var intersection = new Set([...setA].filter(x => setB.has(x)));
  return Array.from(intersection);
}

Shorter, but less readable (also without creating the additional intersection Set):

function intersect(a, b) {
      return [...new Set(a)].filter(x => new Set(b).has(x));
}

Avoiding a new Set from b every time:

function intersect(a, b) {
      var setB = new Set(b);
      return [...new Set(a)].filter(x => setB.has(x));
}

Note that the set implementation will only allow unique values, thus new Set[1,2,3,3].size evaluates to 3.

  • what's this [...setA] syntax? Some special kind of javascript operation? – jxramos Jul 21 '17 at 20:01
  • 1
    @jxramos that is Spread syntax and in this case it is just being used to create an array from the elements in the set. "Array.from(setA)" would also work in this case, but since the question asked for "simplest" I tried to make it cleaner to read on that line. On that matter, I think the code could be simpler, so I'll update the snippet. – nbarbosa Jul 21 '17 at 20:41
  • @nbarbosa I'm curious: why did you "clone" the array a? #filter doesn't destroy the original array, right? It creates a new array? – bplittle Nov 23 '17 at 2:22
  • @bplittle I just created an array from the set in order to remove duplicates, otherwise, using the array directly would result in returning duplicates. For example, if I used the array directly, intersect([1,2,2,4],[2,3]) would yield [2, 2]. – nbarbosa Dec 10 '17 at 4:05
  • "Note that the set implementation will only allow unique values" - that is the literal definition of a Set, not an implementation detail. – Madbreaks Oct 4 at 15:10

Using Underscore.js

_.intersection( [0,345,324] , [1,0,324] )  // gives [0,324]
  • 9
    Op asked for "library-free". – LinuxDisciple Nov 23 '16 at 20:50
  • @LinuxDisciple My mistake for missing that.Thanks for notes – Sai Ram Nov 25 '16 at 5:00
  • 11
    In any case, this is the top google listing for this search so having a library answer is useful. Thanks. – webnoob Jan 18 '17 at 9:25
  • I too am glad this was posted. First time I’ve felt the need for underscore.js. Usually JavaScript map and reduce pipelines do the job elegantly but not this time. – Sridhar-Sarnobat Nov 8 '17 at 2:37
  • I <3 Underscore and I <3 Jeremy Ashkenas (its creator), but even so I HIGHLY recommend checking out Lodash instead. It's basically a superior version of Underscore (it was originally a fork) whose only downside is super-optimized (and thus almost unreadable) source code. The Underscore people even considered getting rid of Underscore entirely (and just telling people to use Lodash), but people who care about source code readability argued to keep it (I was on that side actually, but I've since converted to Lodash). @see github.com/jashkenas/underscore/issues/2182 – machineghost Jan 7 at 18:59

How about just using associative arrays?

function intersect(a, b) {
    var d1 = {};
    var d2 = {};
    var results = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        d1[a[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < b.length; j++) {
        d2[b[j]] = true;
    }
    for (var k in d1) {
        if (d2[k]) 
            results.push(k);
    }
    return results;
}

edit:

// new version
function intersect(a, b) {
    var d = {};
    var results = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
        d[b[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < a.length; j++) {
        if (d[a[j]]) 
            results.push(a[j]);
    }
    return results;
}
  • 1
    This only stands a chance if your arrays only contain strings or numbers, and if none of the script in your page has messed with Object.prototype. – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 10:49
  • The OP's example was using numbers, and if a script has messed with Object.prototype then the script should be rewritten or removed. – Steven Huwig Dec 11 '09 at 15:25
  • You don't need both (d1) and (d2). Create (d2), then loop through (a) instead of looping through (d1). – StanleyH Feb 23 '11 at 10:54
  • @StanleyH - thanks, I think you're right. – Steven Huwig Feb 23 '11 at 14:04
  • Should be d[b[i]] = true; instead of d[b[j]] = true; (i not j). But edit requires 6 chars. – Izhaki Jul 30 '12 at 1:59

My contribution in ES6 terms. In general it finds the intersection of an array with indefinite number of arrays provided as arguments.

Array.prototype.intersect = function(...a) {
  return [this,...a].reduce((p,c) => p.filter(e => c.includes(e)));
}
var arrs = [[0,2,4,6,8],[4,5,6,7],[4,6]],
     arr = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

document.write("<pre>" + JSON.stringify(arr.intersect(...arrs)) + "</pre>");

  • this code looks great, but I do not understand it completely. Possible to explain it please? – novembersky Apr 10 at 17:35
  • 1
    @novembersky It gathers all subject arrays in an array like [[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],[0,2,4,6,8],[4,5,6,7],[4,6]] and then applies .reduce(). First [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9].filter( e => [0,2,4,6,8].includes(e) operation is performed and the result becomes the new p and c becomes [4,5,6,7] in the next turn and continues so on up until there is no more c is left. – Redu Apr 11 at 2:37
  • This is an expensive solution if you're working with large data sets. – Madbreaks Oct 4 at 15:13

Using jQuery:

var a = [1,2,3];
var b = [2,3,4,5];
var c = $(b).not($(b).not(a));
alert(c);
  • 6
    This could also be written as c = $(b).filter(a);, but I wouldn't recommend relying on jQuery for this sort of array manipulation since the documentation only mentions that it works for elements. – Stryner Sep 23 '15 at 18:16
  • This does not answer op's question: "What's the simplest, library-free code..." – Madbreaks Oct 4 at 15:14

The performance of @atk's implementation for sorted arrays of primitives can be improved by using .pop rather than .shift.

function intersect(array1, array2) {
   var result = [];
   // Don't destroy the original arrays
   var a = array1.slice(0);
   var b = array2.slice(0);
   var aLast = a.length - 1;
   var bLast = b.length - 1;
   while (aLast >= 0 && bLast >= 0) {
      if (a[aLast] > b[bLast] ) {
         a.pop();
         aLast--;
      } else if (a[aLast] < b[bLast] ){
         b.pop();
         bLast--;
      } else /* they're equal */ {
         result.push(a.pop());
         b.pop();
         aLast--;
         bLast--;
      }
   }
   return result;
}

I created a benchmark using jsPerf: http://bit.ly/P9FrZK. It's about three times faster to use .pop.

  • 1
    Just as a side note for others - this will only work for numbers, not strings. – Izhaki Jul 30 '12 at 0:15
  • Note that if you replace a[aLast] > b[bLast] with a[aLast].localeCompare(b[bLast]) > 0 (and same with the else if below) then this will work on strings. – andrew Jul 23 '13 at 5:10
  • 1
    The speed difference depends on the size of the arrays because .pop is O(1) and .shift() is O(n) – Esailija Jul 23 '13 at 8:53
  1. Sort it
  2. check one by one from the index 0, create new array from that.

Something like this, Not tested well though.

function intersection(x,y){
 x.sort();y.sort();
 var i=j=0;ret=[];
 while(i<x.length && j<y.length){
  if(x[i]<y[j])i++;
  else if(y[j]<x[i])j++;
  else {
   ret.push(x[i]);
   i++,j++;
  }
 }
 return ret;
}

alert(intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]));

PS:The algorithm only intended for Numbers and Normal Strings, intersection of arbitary object arrays may not work.

  • 3
    Sorting will not necessarily help for arrays of arbitrary objects – Tim Down Dec 11 '09 at 10:47
  • If the array is not sorted, need to loop around 1,000,000 times when you intersect 1000 length array x 1000 length array – YOU Dec 11 '09 at 14:49
  • I think you missed my point, which is that arbitrary objects in JavaScript have no natural sort order, meaning that sorting an array of arbitrary objects will not result in equal objects being grouped. It's no good having an efficient algorithm that doesn't work. – Tim Down Dec 14 '09 at 2:08
  • Ah sorry, I missed "arbitrary objects", yes, You're right. those object cannot sort it, and the algorithm may not work on those. – YOU Dec 14 '09 at 2:10

For arrays containing only strings or numbers you can do something with sorting, as per some of the other answers. For the general case of arrays of arbitrary objects I don't think you can avoid doing it the long way. The following will give you the intersection of any number of arrays provided as parameters to arrayIntersection:

var arrayContains = Array.prototype.indexOf ?
    function(arr, val) {
        return arr.indexOf(val) > -1;
    } :
    function(arr, val) {
        var i = arr.length;
        while (i--) {
            if (arr[i] === val) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    };

function arrayIntersection() {
    var val, arrayCount, firstArray, i, j, intersection = [], missing;
    var arrays = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments); // Convert arguments into a real array

    // Search for common values
    firstArray = arrays.pop();
    if (firstArray) {
        j = firstArray.length;
        arrayCount = arrays.length;
        while (j--) {
            val = firstArray[j];
            missing = false;

            // Check val is present in each remaining array 
            i = arrayCount;
            while (!missing && i--) {
                if ( !arrayContains(arrays[i], val) ) {
                    missing = true;
                }
            }
            if (!missing) {
                intersection.push(val);
            }
        }
    }
    return intersection;
}

arrayIntersection( [1, 2, 3, "a"], [1, "a", 2], ["a", 1] ); // Gives [1, "a"]; 
  • This only works in the case where object identity is the only form of equality. – Steven Huwig Dec 15 '09 at 14:04
  • Well yes, but I think that's what would seem natural to most people. It's also trivial to plug in an alternative function to perform a different equality test. – Tim Down Dec 15 '09 at 19:31
  • I think you are accidentally creating a global variable firstArr in your example. – Jason Jackson Jan 31 '17 at 23:00
  • @JasonJackson: You're right, thanks. Clearly changed my mind about whether to call the variable firstArr or firstArray and didn't update all of the references. Fixed. – Tim Down Feb 1 '17 at 11:43

// Return elements of array a that are also in b in linear time:
function intersect(a, b) {
  return a.filter(Set.prototype.has, new Set(b));
}

// Example:
console.log(intersect([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]));

I recommend above succinct solution which outperforms other implementations on large inputs. If performance on small inputs matters, check the alternatives below.

Alternatives and performance comparison:

See the following snippet for alternative implementations and check https://jsperf.com/array-intersection-comparison for performance comparisons.

function intersect_for(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const alen = a.length;
  const blen = b.length;
  for (let i = 0; i < alen; ++i) {
    const ai = a[i];
    for (let j = 0; j < blen; ++j) {
      if (ai === b[j]) {
        result.push(ai);
        break;
      }
    }
  } 
  return result;
}

function intersect_filter_indexOf(a, b) {
  return a.filter(el => b.indexOf(el) !== -1);
}

function intersect_filter_in(a, b) {
  const map = b.reduce((map, el) => {map[el] = true; return map}, {});
  return a.filter(el => el in map);
}

function intersect_for_in(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const map = {};
  for (let i = 0, length = b.length; i < length; ++i) {
    map[b[i]] = true;
  }
  for (let i = 0, length = a.length; i < length; ++i) {
    if (a[i] in map) result.push(a[i]);
  }
  return result;
}

function intersect_filter_includes(a, b) {
  return a.filter(el => b.includes(el));
}

function intersect_filter_has_this(a, b) {
  return a.filter(Set.prototype.has, new Set(b));
}

function intersect_filter_has_arrow(a, b) {
  const set = new Set(b);
  return a.filter(el => set.has(el));
}

function intersect_for_has(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const set = new Set(b);
  for (let i = 0, length = a.length; i < length; ++i) {
    if (set.has(a[i])) result.push(a[i]);
  }
  return result;
}

Results in Firefox 53:

  • Ops/sec on large arrays (10,000 elements):

    filter + has (this)               523 (this answer)
    for + has                         482
    for-loop + in                     279
    filter + in                       242
    for-loops                          24
    filter + includes                  14
    filter + indexOf                   10
    
  • Ops/sec on small arrays (100 elements):

    for-loop + in                 384,426
    filter + in                   192,066
    for-loops                     159,137
    filter + includes             104,068
    filter + indexOf               71,598
    filter + has (this)            43,531 (this answer)
    filter + has (arrow function)  35,588
    
  • 2
    intersect([1,2,2,3], [2,3,4,5]) returns [2, 2, 3]. – SeregPie May 12 '17 at 9:25
  • 1
    @SeregPie Exactly. As per comment "Return elements of array a that are also in b" – le_m May 12 '17 at 10:32
  • Quality answer, however the use of Sets fundamentally alters results since op's question asked only about array intersections and makes no mention/stipulation of how to handle duplicates. Shy of that, this answer may yield unexpected results when duplicates exist. – Madbreaks Oct 4 at 15:16

It's pretty short using ES2015 and Sets. Accepts Array-like values like a String and removes duplicates.

let intersection = function(a, b) {
  a = new Set(a), b = new Set(b);
  return [...a].filter(v => b.has(v));
};

console.log(intersection([1,2,1,2,3], [2,3,5,4,5,3]));

console.log(intersection('ccaabbab', 'addb').join(''));

  • Convert from Set to array with [...a] will remove the duplicate items, good idea, thanks – V-SHY Nov 4 '17 at 17:25
  • This solution was provided twice prior to yours. – Madbreaks Oct 4 at 15:18

A tiny tweak to the smallest one here (the filter/indexOf solution), namely creating an index of the values in one of the arrays using a JavaScript object, will reduce it from O(N*M) to "probably" linear time. source1 source2

function intersect(a, b) {
  var aa = {};
  a.forEach(function(v) { aa[v]=1; });
  return b.filter(function(v) { return v in aa; });
}

This isn't the very simplest solution (it's more code than filter+indexOf), nor is it the very fastest (probably slower by a constant factor than intersect_safe()), but seems like a pretty good balance. It is on the very simple side, while providing good performance, and it doesn't require pre-sorted inputs.

function intersection(A,B){
var result = new Array();
for (i=0; i<A.length; i++) {
    for (j=0; j<B.length; j++) {
        if (A[i] == B[j] && $.inArray(A[i],result) == -1) {
            result.push(A[i]);
        }
    }
}
return result;
}

With some restrictions on your data, you can do it in linear time!

For positive integers: use an array mapping the values to a "seen/not seen" boolean.

function intersectIntegers(array1,array2) { 
   var seen=[],
       result=[];
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     seen[array1[i]] = true;
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
     if ( seen[array2[i]])
        result.push(array2[i]);
   }
   return result;
}

There is a similar technique for objects: take a dummy key, set it to "true" for each element in array1, then look for this key in elements of array2. Clean up when you're done.

function intersectObjects(array1,array2) { 
   var result=[];
   var key="tmpKey_intersect"
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     array1[i][key] = true;
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
     if (array2[i][key])
        result.push(array2[i]);
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     delete array1[i][key];
   }
   return result;
}

Of course you need to be sure the key didn't appear before, otherwise you'll be destroying your data...

  • By the way, this can be easily extended to interesect any number of arrays: replace the boolean by integers, and increment each time it is seen: you can easily read the intersection on the last round. – tarulen Oct 5 '15 at 12:22
  • Interesting solution, I like it. Most other solutions are O(n^2), but this is O(n). I added the integer code to ericP's performance fiddle here jsfiddle.net/321juyLu/2. It came 3rd, me likey :) – rmcsharry Sep 18 '16 at 8:16

Another indexed approach able to process any number of arrays at once:

// Calculate intersection of multiple array or object values.
function intersect (arrList) {
    var arrLength = Object.keys(arrList).length;
        // (Also accepts regular objects as input)
    var index = {};
    for (var i in arrList) {
        for (var j in arrList[i]) {
            var v = arrList[i][j];
            if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = 0;
            index[v]++;
        };
    };
    var retv = [];
    for (var i in index) {
        if (index[i] == arrLength) retv.push(i);
    };
    return retv;
};

It works only for values that can be evaluated as strings and you should pass them as an array like:

intersect ([arr1, arr2, arr3...]);

...but it transparently accepts objects as parameter or as any of the elements to be intersected (always returning array of common values). Examples:

intersect ({foo: [1, 2, 3, 4], bar: {a: 2, j:4}}); // [2, 4]
intersect ([{x: "hello", y: "world"}, ["hello", "user"]]); // ["hello"]

EDIT: I just noticed that this is, in a way, slightly buggy.

That is: I coded it thinking that input arrays cannot itself contain repetitions (as provided example doesn't).

But if input arrays happen to contain repetitions, that would produce wrong results. Example (using below implementation):

intersect ([[1, 3, 4, 6, 3], [1, 8, 99]]);
// Expected: [ '1' ]
// Actual: [ '1', '3' ]

Fortunately this is easy to fix by simply adding second level indexing. That is:

Change:

        if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = 0;
        index[v]++;

by:

        if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = {};
        index[v][i] = true; // Mark as present in i input.

...and:

         if (index[i] == arrLength) retv.push(i);

by:

         if (Object.keys(index[i]).length == arrLength) retv.push(i);

Complete example:

// Calculate intersection of multiple array or object values.
function intersect (arrList) {
    var arrLength = Object.keys(arrList).length;
        // (Also accepts regular objects as input)
    var index = {};
    for (var i in arrList) {
        for (var j in arrList[i]) {
            var v = arrList[i][j];
            if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = {};
            index[v][i] = true; // Mark as present in i input.
        };
    };
    var retv = [];
    for (var i in index) {
        if (Object.keys(index[i]).length == arrLength) retv.push(i);
    };
    return retv;
};

intersect ([[1, 3, 4, 6, 3], [1, 8, 99]]); // [ '1' ]
  • 2
    This is far the best answer with a small modification. After the var v = line add if (typeof v == 'function') continue; and it will skip adding functions to the results. Thanks! – Zsolti Aug 31 '16 at 7:58
  • Thanks @Zsolti. I don't add your suggestion because having functions (and the way we want to handle it) is out of the scope of the original question. But see my edit: If you can have repetitions in your input arrays, then original implementation is buggy. I fixed it in my edit. ...On the other hand, if you know for sure that there won't be any repetition, the original implementation is slightly cheaper. – bitifet Oct 6 '16 at 6:01
  • ...about functions, they also can be intersected: If we detect them like @Zsolti says (with if (typeof v == 'function'), then we can use its stringification (v.toString()) as key for the index. But, we need to do something to preserve it intact. The easiest way to do so is simply assign the original function as value instead of a simple boolean true value. But, in that case, the latest deindexaton should be also altered to detect this condition and restore the right value (the function). – bitifet Aug 16 '17 at 7:42

I'll contribute with what has been working out best for me:

if (!Array.prototype.intersect){
Array.prototype.intersect = function (arr1) {

    var r = [], o = {}, l = this.length, i, v;
    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        o[this[i]] = true;
    }
    l = arr1.length;
    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        v = arr1[i];
        if (v in o) {
            r.push(v);
        }
    }
    return r;
};
}

"indexOf" for IE 9.0, chrome, firefox, opera,

    function intersection(a,b){
     var rs = [], x = a.length;
     while (x--) b.indexOf(a[x])!=-1 && rs.push(a[x]);
     return rs.sort();
    }

intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]);
//Result:  [2,3]

'use strict'

// Example 1
function intersection(a1, a2) {
    return a1.filter(x => a2.indexOf(x) > -1)
}

// Example 2 (prototype function)
Array.prototype.intersection = function(arr) {
    return this.filter(x => arr.indexOf(x) > -1)
} 

const a1 = [1, 2, 3]
const a2 = [2, 3, 4, 5]

console.log(intersection(a1, a2))
console.log(a1.intersection(a2))

A functional approach with ES2015

A functional approach must consider using only pure functions without side effects, each of which is only concerned with a single job.

These restrictions enhance the composability and reusability of the functions involved.

// small, reusable auxiliary functions

const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));
const apply = f => x => f(x);


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];


// run it

console.log( intersect(xs) (ys) );

Please note that the native Set type is used, which has an advantageous lookup performance.

Avoid duplicates

Obviously repeatedly occurring items from the first Array are preserved, while the second Array is de-duplicated. This may be or may be not the desired behavior. If you need a unique result just apply dedupe to the first argument:

// auxiliary functions

const apply = f => x => f(x);
const comp = f => g => x => f(g(x));
const afrom = apply(Array.from);
const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// de-duplication

const dedupe = comp(afrom) (createSet);


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];


// unique result

console.log( intersect(dedupe(xs)) (ys) );

Compute the intersection of any number of Arrays

If you want to compute the intersection of an arbitrarily number of Arrays just compose intersect with foldl. Here is a convenience function:

// auxiliary functions

const apply = f => x => f(x);
const uncurry = f => (x, y) => f(x) (y);
const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));
const foldl = f => acc => xs => xs.reduce(uncurry(f), acc);


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// intersection of an arbitrarily number of Arrays

const intersectn = (head, ...tail) => foldl(intersect) (head) (tail);


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];
const zs = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6];


// run

console.log( intersectn(xs, ys, zs) );

  • Impressively functional: had to do a double-take to confirm that's not Haskell. The only nitpick is: (expr ? true : false) is redundant. Use just expr if actual booleans aren't needed, just truthy/falsy. – jose_castro_arnaud Nov 28 '17 at 17:48

For simplicity:

// Usage
const intersection = allLists
  .reduce(intersect, allValues)
  .reduce(removeDuplicates, []);


// Implementation
const intersect = (intersection, list) =>
  intersection.filter(item =>
    list.some(x => x === item));

const removeDuplicates = (uniques, item) =>
  uniques.includes(item) ? uniques : uniques.concat(item);


// Example Data
const somePeople = [bob, doug, jill];
const otherPeople = [sarah, bob, jill];
const morePeople = [jack, jill];

const allPeople = [...somePeople, ...otherPeople, ...morePeople];
const allGroups = [somePeople, otherPeople, morePeople];

// Example Usage
const intersection = allGroups
  .reduce(intersect, allPeople)
  .reduce(removeDuplicates, []);

intersection; // [jill]

Benefits:

  • dirt simple
  • data-centric
  • works for arbitrary number of lists
  • works for arbitrary lengths of lists
  • works for arbitrary types of values
  • works for arbitrary sort order
  • retains shape (order of first appearance in any array)
  • exits early where possible
  • memory safe, short of tampering with Function / Array prototypes

Drawbacks:

  • higher memory usage
  • higher CPU usage
  • requires an understanding of reduce
  • requires understanding of data flow

You wouldn't want to use this for 3D engine or kernel work, but if you have problems getting this to run in an event-based app, your design has bigger problems.

.reduce to build a map, and .filter to find the intersection. delete within the .filter allows us to treat the second array as though it's a unique set.

function intersection (a, b) {
  var seen = a.reduce(function (h, k) {
    h[k] = true;
    return h;
  }, {});

  return b.filter(function (k) {
    var exists = seen[k];
    delete seen[k];
    return exists;
  });
}

I find this approach pretty easy to reason about. It performs in constant time.

This is probably the simplest one, besides list1.filter(n => list2.includes(n))

var list1 = ['bread', 'ice cream', 'cereals', 'strawberry', 'chocolate']
var list2 = ['bread', 'cherry', 'ice cream', 'oats']

function check_common(list1, list2){
	
	list3 = []
	for (let i=0; i<list1.length; i++){
		
		for (let j=0; j<list2.length; j++){	
			if (list1[i] === list2[j]){
				list3.push(list1[i]);				
			}		
		}
		
	}
	return list3
	
}

check_common(list1, list2) // ["bread", "ice cream"]

Here is underscore.js implementation:

_.intersection = function(array) {
  if (array == null) return [];
  var result = [];
  var argsLength = arguments.length;
  for (var i = 0, length = array.length; i < length; i++) {
    var item = array[i];
    if (_.contains(result, item)) continue;
    for (var j = 1; j < argsLength; j++) {
      if (!_.contains(arguments[j], item)) break;
    }
    if (j === argsLength) result.push(item);
  }
  return result;
};

Source: http://underscorejs.org/docs/underscore.html#section-62

var listA = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7];
var listB = [2,4,6,8];

var result = listA.filter(itemA=> {
    return listB.some(itemB => itemB === itemA);
});
  • 1
    You could also drop the { and return; i.e. listA.filter(a => listB.some(b => b === a)) -- (although using ES6+ code assumes it will either be transpiled to ES5, or only ever run on a modern engine/browser) – ReactiveRaven Jan 25 '17 at 0:39
  • yes, You'r rigth – jcmordan Jan 25 '17 at 3:07
function getIntersection(arr1, arr2){
    var result = [];
    arr1.forEach(function(elem){
        arr2.forEach(function(elem2){
            if(elem === elem2){
                result.push(elem);
            }
        });
    });
    return result;
}

getIntersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]); // [ 2, 3 ]

Here's a very naive implementation I'm using. It's non-destructive and also makes sure not to duplicate entires.

Array.prototype.contains = function(elem) {
    return(this.indexOf(elem) > -1);
};

Array.prototype.intersect = function( array ) {
    // this is naive--could use some optimization
    var result = [];
    for ( var i = 0; i < this.length; i++ ) {
        if ( array.contains(this[i]) && !result.contains(this[i]) )
            result.push( this[i] );
    }
    return result;
}

intersection of N arrays in coffeescript

getIntersection: (arrays) ->
    if not arrays.length
        return []
    a1 = arrays[0]
    for a2 in arrays.slice(1)
        a = (val for val in a1 when val in a2)
        a1 = a
    return a1.unique()

I extended tarulen's answer to work with any number of arrays. It also should work with non-integer values.

function intersect() { 
    const last = arguments.length - 1;
    var seen={};
    var result=[];
    for (var i = 0; i < last; i++)   {
        for (var j = 0; j < arguments[i].length; j++)  {
            if (seen[arguments[i][j]])  {
                seen[arguments[i][j]] += 1;
            }
            else if (!i)    {
                seen[arguments[i][j]] = 1;
            }
        }
    }
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments[last].length; i++) {
        if ( seen[arguments[last][i]] === last)
            result.push(arguments[last][i]);
        }
    return result;
}

Building on Anon's excellent answer, this one returns the intersection of two or more arrays.

function arrayIntersect(arrayOfArrays)
{        
    var arrayCopy = arrayOfArrays.slice(),
        baseArray = arrayCopy.pop();

    return baseArray.filter(function(item) {
        return arrayCopy.every(function(itemList) {
            return itemList.indexOf(item) !== -1;
        });
    });
}

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