877

What's the simplest, library-free code for implementing array intersections in javascript? I want to write

intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5])

and get

[2, 3]
10
  • 37
    Do you want simple or fast?
    – SLaks
    Dec 11, 2009 at 3:07
  • 19
    Priority is simple, but it can't be so brain-dead that it will be a performance hog :)
    – Peter
    Dec 11, 2009 at 3:08
  • Adding a break to Simple js loops increases the ops/sec to ~10M
    – Richard
    Aug 30, 2012 at 16:17
  • Nice! But what if they are not numeric types? What if they are custom objects that need a custom check? Apr 16, 2013 at 20:02
  • Functions in the test return wrong results. In fact only one implementation returns the expected result.
    – hegemon
    Oct 16, 2013 at 19:06

37 Answers 37

1641

Use a combination of Array.prototype.filter and Array.prototype.includes:

const filteredArray = array1.filter(value => array2.includes(value));

For older browsers, with Array.prototype.indexOf and without an arrow function:

var filteredArray = array1.filter(function(n) {
    return array2.indexOf(n) !== -1;
});

NB! Both .includes and .indexOf internally compares elements in the array by using ===, so if the array contains objects it will only compare object references (not their content). If you want to specify your own comparison logic, use Array.prototype.some instead.

11
  • 26
    Best answer here, both for simplicity and working with non-numbers
    – Muhd
    Aug 10, 2013 at 0:43
  • 6
    For those who are curious, minimum version of IE to get this working is: 9
    – bashaus
    Aug 14, 2015 at 9:23
  • 66
    intersection([1,2,1,1,3], [1]) returns [1, 1, 1]. Shouldn't it return just [1]?
    – dev
    Jun 10, 2016 at 10:35
  • 7
    Good catch. You will need a second filter. See the example here: stackoverflow.com/a/16227294/390519 (<-- at the end of that answer)
    – loneboat
    Jul 5, 2016 at 23:56
  • 27
    Isn't this highly inefficient, being O(n^2).
    – paul23
    Jun 1, 2020 at 17:26
161

Destructive seems simplest, especially if we can assume the input is sorted:

/* destructively finds the intersection of 
 * two arrays in a simple fashion.  
 *
 * PARAMS
 *  a - first array, must already be sorted
 *  b - second array, must already be sorted
 *
 * NOTES
 *  State of input arrays is undefined when
 *  the function returns.  They should be 
 *  (prolly) be dumped.
 *
 *  Should have O(n) operations, where n is 
 *    n = MIN(a.length, b.length)
 */
function intersection_destructive(a, b)
{
  var result = [];
  while( a.length > 0 && b.length > 0 )
  {  
     if      (a[0] < b[0] ){ a.shift(); }
     else if (a[0] > b[0] ){ b.shift(); }
     else /* they're equal */
     {
       result.push(a.shift());
       b.shift();
     }
  }

  return result;
}

Non-destructive has to be a hair more complicated, since we’ve got to track indices:

/* finds the intersection of 
 * two arrays in a simple fashion.  
 *
 * PARAMS
 *  a - first array, must already be sorted
 *  b - second array, must already be sorted
 *
 * NOTES
 *
 *  Should have O(n) operations, where n is 
 *    n = MIN(a.length(), b.length())
 */
function intersect_safe(a, b)
{
  var ai=0, bi=0;
  var result = [];

  while( ai < a.length && bi < b.length )
  {
     if      (a[ai] < b[bi] ){ ai++; }
     else if (a[ai] > b[bi] ){ bi++; }
     else /* they're equal */
     {
       result.push(a[ai]);
       ai++;
       bi++;
     }
  }

  return result;
}
8
  • It's array.shift creating a new array under-the-hood with every call?
    – thesmart
    Jul 19, 2012 at 16:36
  • 1
    @thesmart: you're right, there are definitely more performant ways to do it. The code, above, was intended to be simple, not fast :)
    – atk
    Jul 19, 2012 at 23:52
  • 5
    .shift requires moving every element (O(n) in itself) in the array so the comment about complexity of the first version is wrong
    – Esailija
    Jul 23, 2013 at 8:46
  • 1
    No, the loop stops when one of the arrays is done, not necessarily the shorter array. Check this example.
    – Shawn
    Nov 6, 2016 at 20:59
  • 1
    The destructive version removes the advantage of requiring a sorted array: not running in quadratic time. I don’t think it even improves readability. Editing this down to just the fast, non-destructive version would make the answer much better.
    – Ry-
    Jul 16, 2020 at 23:45
112

If your environment supports ECMAScript 6 Set, one simple and supposedly efficient (see specification link) way:

function intersect(a, b) {
  var setA = new Set(a);
  var setB = new Set(b);
  var intersection = new Set([...setA].filter(x => setB.has(x)));
  return Array.from(intersection);
}

Shorter, but less readable (also without creating the additional intersection Set):

function intersect(a, b) {
  var setB = new Set(b);
  return [...new Set(a)].filter(x => setB.has(x));
}

Note that when using sets you will only get distinct values, thus new Set([1, 2, 3, 3]).size evaluates to 3.

7
  • 2
    what's this [...setA] syntax? Some special kind of javascript operation?
    – jxramos
    Jul 21, 2017 at 20:01
  • 3
    @jxramos that is Spread syntax and in this case it is just being used to create an array from the elements in the set. "Array.from(setA)" would also work in this case, but since the question asked for "simplest" I tried to make it cleaner to read on that line. On that matter, I think the code could be simpler, so I'll update the snippet.
    – nbarbosa
    Jul 21, 2017 at 20:41
  • @nbarbosa I'm curious: why did you "clone" the array a? #filter doesn't destroy the original array, right? It creates a new array?
    – bplittle
    Nov 23, 2017 at 2:22
  • 2
    "Note that the set implementation will only allow unique values" - that is the literal definition of a Set, not an implementation detail.
    – Madbreaks
    Oct 4, 2018 at 15:10
  • 5
    In the first example (removing duplicates), there’s no need to create a set from both a and intersection. Just one or the other is enough.
    – Ry-
    Jun 15, 2020 at 16:53
75

Using Underscore.js or lodash.js

_.intersection( [0,345,324] , [1,0,324] )  // gives [0,324]
4
  • 38
    Op asked for "library-free". Nov 23, 2016 at 20:50
  • 78
    In any case, this is the top google listing for this search so having a library answer is useful. Thanks.
    – webnoob
    Jan 18, 2017 at 9:25
  • It is a good approach but I wonder which is faster/more-efficient: arrA.filter(e=>e.includes(arrB)) or _.intersection(arrA, arrB)?
    – Ivancho
    Dec 17, 2021 at 3:59
  • hey, is it possible to pass a list of lists to this function ? like [ [ { tokenId: 2 } ], [ { tokenId: 2 }, { tokenId: 3 } ] ] and expecting it to returns { tokenId: 2 } ? Mar 31 at 13:03
43

// Return elements of array a that are also in b in linear time:
function intersect(a, b) {
  return a.filter(Set.prototype.has, new Set(b));
}

// Example:
console.log(intersect([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]));

I recommend above succinct solution which outperforms other implementations on large inputs. If performance on small inputs matters, check the alternatives below.

Alternatives and performance comparison:

See the following snippet for alternative implementations and check https://jsperf.com/array-intersection-comparison for performance comparisons.

function intersect_for(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const alen = a.length;
  const blen = b.length;
  for (let i = 0; i < alen; ++i) {
    const ai = a[i];
    for (let j = 0; j < blen; ++j) {
      if (ai === b[j]) {
        result.push(ai);
        break;
      }
    }
  } 
  return result;
}

function intersect_filter_indexOf(a, b) {
  return a.filter(el => b.indexOf(el) !== -1);
}

function intersect_filter_in(a, b) {
  const map = b.reduce((map, el) => {map[el] = true; return map}, {});
  return a.filter(el => el in map);
}

function intersect_for_in(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const map = {};
  for (let i = 0, length = b.length; i < length; ++i) {
    map[b[i]] = true;
  }
  for (let i = 0, length = a.length; i < length; ++i) {
    if (a[i] in map) result.push(a[i]);
  }
  return result;
}

function intersect_filter_includes(a, b) {
  return a.filter(el => b.includes(el));
}

function intersect_filter_has_this(a, b) {
  return a.filter(Set.prototype.has, new Set(b));
}

function intersect_filter_has_arrow(a, b) {
  const set = new Set(b);
  return a.filter(el => set.has(el));
}

function intersect_for_has(a, b) {
  const result = [];
  const set = new Set(b);
  for (let i = 0, length = a.length; i < length; ++i) {
    if (set.has(a[i])) result.push(a[i]);
  }
  return result;
}

Results in Firefox 53:

  • Ops/sec on large arrays (10,000 elements):

    filter + has (this)               523 (this answer)
    for + has                         482
    for-loop + in                     279
    filter + in                       242
    for-loops                          24
    filter + includes                  14
    filter + indexOf                   10
    
  • Ops/sec on small arrays (100 elements):

    for-loop + in                 384,426
    filter + in                   192,066
    for-loops                     159,137
    filter + includes             104,068
    filter + indexOf               71,598
    filter + has (this)            43,531 (this answer)
    filter + has (arrow function)  35,588
    
5
  • 4
    intersect([1,2,2,3], [2,3,4,5]) returns [2, 2, 3].
    – SeregPie
    May 12, 2017 at 9:25
  • 4
    @SeregPie Exactly. As per comment "Return elements of array a that are also in b"
    – le_m
    May 12, 2017 at 10:32
  • Quality answer, however the use of Sets fundamentally alters results since op's question asked only about array intersections and makes no mention/stipulation of how to handle duplicates. Shy of that, this answer may yield unexpected results when duplicates exist.
    – Madbreaks
    Oct 4, 2018 at 15:16
  • has internally uses indexOf. It is considered as O(n). So given solution is not linear.
    – xdeepakv
    Aug 14, 2021 at 17:14
  • @xdeepakv: No, it doesn’t. Not sure where you got that idea.
    – Ry-
    Nov 10, 2021 at 6:02
18

My contribution in ES6 terms. In general it finds the intersection of an array with indefinite number of arrays provided as arguments.

Array.prototype.intersect = function(...a) {
  return [this,...a].reduce((p,c) => p.filter(e => c.includes(e)));
}
var arrs = [[0,2,4,6,8],[4,5,6,7],[4,6]],
     arr = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

document.write("<pre>" + JSON.stringify(arr.intersect(...arrs)) + "</pre>");

5
  • this code looks great, but I do not understand it completely. Possible to explain it please?
    – theusual
    Apr 10, 2018 at 17:35
  • 2
    @novembersky It gathers all subject arrays in an array like [[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],[0,2,4,6,8],[4,5,6,7],[4,6]] and then applies .reduce(). First [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9].filter( e => [0,2,4,6,8].includes(e) operation is performed and the result becomes the new p and c becomes [4,5,6,7] in the next turn and continues so on up until there is no more c is left.
    – Redu
    Apr 11, 2018 at 2:37
  • 2
    This is an expensive solution if you're working with large data sets.
    – Madbreaks
    Oct 4, 2018 at 15:13
  • 4
    Don't modify the prototype unnecessarily.
    – fregante
    Jan 4, 2019 at 12:16
  • 1
    …and if you do want to modify Array.prototype, at least do it correctly
    – Bergi
    Jan 2, 2021 at 12:33
12

How about just using associative arrays?

function intersect(a, b) {
    var d1 = {};
    var d2 = {};
    var results = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        d1[a[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < b.length; j++) {
        d2[b[j]] = true;
    }
    for (var k in d1) {
        if (d2[k]) 
            results.push(k);
    }
    return results;
}

edit:

// new version
function intersect(a, b) {
    var d = {};
    var results = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < b.length; i++) {
        d[b[i]] = true;
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < a.length; j++) {
        if (d[a[j]]) 
            results.push(a[j]);
    }
    return results;
}
6
  • 2
    This only stands a chance if your arrays only contain strings or numbers, and if none of the script in your page has messed with Object.prototype.
    – Tim Down
    Dec 11, 2009 at 10:49
  • 4
    The OP's example was using numbers, and if a script has messed with Object.prototype then the script should be rewritten or removed. Dec 11, 2009 at 15:25
  • You don't need both (d1) and (d2). Create (d2), then loop through (a) instead of looping through (d1).
    – StanleyH
    Feb 23, 2011 at 10:54
  • Should be d[b[i]] = true; instead of d[b[j]] = true; (i not j). But edit requires 6 chars.
    – Izhaki
    Jul 30, 2012 at 1:59
  • @Izhaki thanks, fixed. (Added a // comment to get around minimum edit requirement.) Jul 30, 2012 at 15:01
10

The performance of @atk's implementation for sorted arrays of primitives can be improved by using .pop rather than .shift.

function intersect(array1, array2) {
   var result = [];
   // Don't destroy the original arrays
   var a = array1.slice(0);
   var b = array2.slice(0);
   var aLast = a.length - 1;
   var bLast = b.length - 1;
   while (aLast >= 0 && bLast >= 0) {
      if (a[aLast] > b[bLast] ) {
         a.pop();
         aLast--;
      } else if (a[aLast] < b[bLast] ){
         b.pop();
         bLast--;
      } else /* they're equal */ {
         result.push(a.pop());
         b.pop();
         aLast--;
         bLast--;
      }
   }
   return result;
}

I created a benchmark using jsPerf: http://bit.ly/P9FrZK. It's about three times faster to use .pop.

3
  • 3
    Just as a side note for others - this will only work for numbers, not strings.
    – Izhaki
    Jul 30, 2012 at 0:15
  • Note that if you replace a[aLast] > b[bLast] with a[aLast].localeCompare(b[bLast]) > 0 (and same with the else if below) then this will work on strings.
    – andrew
    Jul 23, 2013 at 5:10
  • 3
    The speed difference depends on the size of the arrays because .pop is O(1) and .shift() is O(n)
    – Esailija
    Jul 23, 2013 at 8:53
9
  1. Sort it
  2. check one by one from the index 0, create new array from that.

Something like this, Not tested well though.

function intersection(x,y){
 x.sort();y.sort();
 var i=j=0;ret=[];
 while(i<x.length && j<y.length){
  if(x[i]<y[j])i++;
  else if(y[j]<x[i])j++;
  else {
   ret.push(x[i]);
   i++,j++;
  }
 }
 return ret;
}

alert(intersection([1,2,3], [2,3,4,5]));

PS:The algorithm only intended for Numbers and Normal Strings, intersection of arbitary object arrays may not work.

4
  • 3
    Sorting will not necessarily help for arrays of arbitrary objects
    – Tim Down
    Dec 11, 2009 at 10:47
  • If the array is not sorted, need to loop around 1,000,000 times when you intersect 1000 length array x 1000 length array
    – YOU
    Dec 11, 2009 at 14:49
  • I think you missed my point, which is that arbitrary objects in JavaScript have no natural sort order, meaning that sorting an array of arbitrary objects will not result in equal objects being grouped. It's no good having an efficient algorithm that doesn't work.
    – Tim Down
    Dec 14, 2009 at 2:08
  • Ah sorry, I missed "arbitrary objects", yes, You're right. those object cannot sort it, and the algorithm may not work on those.
    – YOU
    Dec 14, 2009 at 2:10
9

Using jQuery:

var a = [1,2,3];
var b = [2,3,4,5];
var c = $(b).not($(b).not(a));
alert(c);
2
  • 9
    This could also be written as c = $(b).filter(a);, but I wouldn't recommend relying on jQuery for this sort of array manipulation since the documentation only mentions that it works for elements.
    – Stryner
    Sep 23, 2015 at 18:16
  • 2
    This does not answer op's question: "What's the simplest, library-free code..."
    – Madbreaks
    Oct 4, 2018 at 15:14
9

If you need to have it handle intersecting multiple arrays:

const intersect = (a1, a2, ...rest) => {
  const a12 = a1.filter(value => a2.includes(value))
  if (rest.length === 0) { return a12; }
  return intersect(a12, ...rest);
};

console.log(intersect([1,2,3,4,5], [1,2], [1, 2, 3,4,5], [2, 10, 1])) 

3
  • But how fast is this solution for 30 arrays with 100 elements ?
    – aidonsnous
    Jan 6, 2019 at 10:50
  • This is using nothing but native to Javascript methods, and therefor the VM in which the code will run is free to optimize it as far as it can. I am quite positive that there exists no faster solution given you are running this in a modern version of V8 relative to the age of this comment.
    – Belfordz
    May 28, 2019 at 20:01
  • @Belfordz: No, this is incredibly slow because of all the array copying and unnecessary set reconstruction. Using new Set(b).has(x) without keeping the set is even slower than just b.includes(x).
    – Ry-
    Jun 15, 2020 at 16:28
6

For arrays containing only strings or numbers you can do something with sorting, as per some of the other answers. For the general case of arrays of arbitrary objects I don't think you can avoid doing it the long way. The following will give you the intersection of any number of arrays provided as parameters to arrayIntersection:

var arrayContains = Array.prototype.indexOf ?
    function(arr, val) {
        return arr.indexOf(val) > -1;
    } :
    function(arr, val) {
        var i = arr.length;
        while (i--) {
            if (arr[i] === val) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    };

function arrayIntersection() {
    var val, arrayCount, firstArray, i, j, intersection = [], missing;
    var arrays = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments); // Convert arguments into a real array

    // Search for common values
    firstArray = arrays.pop();
    if (firstArray) {
        j = firstArray.length;
        arrayCount = arrays.length;
        while (j--) {
            val = firstArray[j];
            missing = false;

            // Check val is present in each remaining array 
            i = arrayCount;
            while (!missing && i--) {
                if ( !arrayContains(arrays[i], val) ) {
                    missing = true;
                }
            }
            if (!missing) {
                intersection.push(val);
            }
        }
    }
    return intersection;
}

arrayIntersection( [1, 2, 3, "a"], [1, "a", 2], ["a", 1] ); // Gives [1, "a"]; 
4
  • This only works in the case where object identity is the only form of equality. Dec 15, 2009 at 14:04
  • Well yes, but I think that's what would seem natural to most people. It's also trivial to plug in an alternative function to perform a different equality test.
    – Tim Down
    Dec 15, 2009 at 19:31
  • I think you are accidentally creating a global variable firstArr in your example. Jan 31, 2017 at 23:00
  • @JasonJackson: You're right, thanks. Clearly changed my mind about whether to call the variable firstArr or firstArray and didn't update all of the references. Fixed.
    – Tim Down
    Feb 1, 2017 at 11:43
5

A tiny tweak to the smallest one here (the filter/indexOf solution), namely creating an index of the values in one of the arrays using a JavaScript object, will reduce it from O(N*M) to "probably" linear time. source1 source2

function intersect(a, b) {
  var aa = {};
  a.forEach(function(v) { aa[v]=1; });
  return b.filter(function(v) { return v in aa; });
}

This isn't the very simplest solution (it's more code than filter+indexOf), nor is it the very fastest (probably slower by a constant factor than intersect_safe()), but seems like a pretty good balance. It is on the very simple side, while providing good performance, and it doesn't require pre-sorted inputs.

5

Another indexed approach able to process any number of arrays at once:

// Calculate intersection of multiple array or object values.
function intersect (arrList) {
    var arrLength = Object.keys(arrList).length;
        // (Also accepts regular objects as input)
    var index = {};
    for (var i in arrList) {
        for (var j in arrList[i]) {
            var v = arrList[i][j];
            if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = 0;
            index[v]++;
        };
    };
    var retv = [];
    for (var i in index) {
        if (index[i] == arrLength) retv.push(i);
    };
    return retv;
};

It works only for values that can be evaluated as strings and you should pass them as an array like:

intersect ([arr1, arr2, arr3...]);

...but it transparently accepts objects as parameter or as any of the elements to be intersected (always returning array of common values). Examples:

intersect ({foo: [1, 2, 3, 4], bar: {a: 2, j:4}}); // [2, 4]
intersect ([{x: "hello", y: "world"}, ["hello", "user"]]); // ["hello"]

EDIT: I just noticed that this is, in a way, slightly buggy.

That is: I coded it thinking that input arrays cannot itself contain repetitions (as provided example doesn't).

But if input arrays happen to contain repetitions, that would produce wrong results. Example (using below implementation):

intersect ([[1, 3, 4, 6, 3], [1, 8, 99]]);
// Expected: [ '1' ]
// Actual: [ '1', '3' ]

Fortunately this is easy to fix by simply adding second level indexing. That is:

Change:

        if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = 0;
        index[v]++;

by:

        if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = {};
        index[v][i] = true; // Mark as present in i input.

...and:

         if (index[i] == arrLength) retv.push(i);

by:

         if (Object.keys(index[i]).length == arrLength) retv.push(i);

Complete example:

// Calculate intersection of multiple array or object values.
function intersect (arrList) {
    var arrLength = Object.keys(arrList).length;
        // (Also accepts regular objects as input)
    var index = {};
    for (var i in arrList) {
        for (var j in arrList[i]) {
            var v = arrList[i][j];
            if (index[v] === undefined) index[v] = {};
            index[v][i] = true; // Mark as present in i input.
        };
    };
    var retv = [];
    for (var i in index) {
        if (Object.keys(index[i]).length == arrLength) retv.push(i);
    };
    return retv;
};

intersect ([[1, 3, 4, 6, 3], [1, 8, 99]]); // [ '1' ]
4
  • 2
    This is far the best answer with a small modification. After the var v = line add if (typeof v == 'function') continue; and it will skip adding functions to the results. Thanks!
    – Zsolti
    Aug 31, 2016 at 7:58
  • Thanks @Zsolti. I don't add your suggestion because having functions (and the way we want to handle it) is out of the scope of the original question. But see my edit: If you can have repetitions in your input arrays, then original implementation is buggy. I fixed it in my edit. ...On the other hand, if you know for sure that there won't be any repetition, the original implementation is slightly cheaper.
    – bitifet
    Oct 6, 2016 at 6:01
  • ...about functions, they also can be intersected: If we detect them like @Zsolti says (with if (typeof v == 'function'), then we can use its stringification (v.toString()) as key for the index. But, we need to do something to preserve it intact. The easiest way to do so is simply assign the original function as value instead of a simple boolean true value. But, in that case, the latest deindexaton should be also altered to detect this condition and restore the right value (the function).
    – bitifet
    Aug 16, 2017 at 7:42
  • How fast can this be with 30 arrays with 100 elements.. how is the CPU usage?
    – aidonsnous
    Jan 6, 2019 at 10:58
4

With some restrictions on your data, you can do it in linear time!

For positive integers: use an array mapping the values to a "seen/not seen" boolean.

function intersectIntegers(array1,array2) { 
   var seen=[],
       result=[];
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     seen[array1[i]] = true;
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
     if ( seen[array2[i]])
        result.push(array2[i]);
   }
   return result;
}

There is a similar technique for objects: take a dummy key, set it to "true" for each element in array1, then look for this key in elements of array2. Clean up when you're done.

function intersectObjects(array1,array2) { 
   var result=[];
   var key="tmpKey_intersect"
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     array1[i][key] = true;
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array2.length; i++) {
     if (array2[i][key])
        result.push(array2[i]);
   }
   for (var i = 0; i < array1.length; i++) {
     delete array1[i][key];
   }
   return result;
}

Of course you need to be sure the key didn't appear before, otherwise you'll be destroying your data...

2
  • By the way, this can be easily extended to interesect any number of arrays: replace the boolean by integers, and increment each time it is seen: you can easily read the intersection on the last round.
    – tarulen
    Oct 5, 2015 at 12:22
  • Interesting solution, I like it. Most other solutions are O(n^2), but this is O(n). I added the integer code to ericP's performance fiddle here jsfiddle.net/321juyLu/2. It came 3rd, me likey :)
    – rmcsharry
    Sep 18, 2016 at 8:16
3
function intersection(A,B){
var result = new Array();
for (i=0; i<A.length; i++) {
    for (j=0; j<B.length; j++) {
        if (A[i] == B[j] && $.inArray(A[i],result) == -1) {
            result.push(A[i]);
        }
    }
}
return result;
}
0
3

For simplicity:

// Usage
const intersection = allLists
  .reduce(intersect, allValues)
  .reduce(removeDuplicates, []);


// Implementation
const intersect = (intersection, list) =>
  intersection.filter(item =>
    list.some(x => x === item));

const removeDuplicates = (uniques, item) =>
  uniques.includes(item) ? uniques : uniques.concat(item);


// Example Data
const somePeople = [bob, doug, jill];
const otherPeople = [sarah, bob, jill];
const morePeople = [jack, jill];

const allPeople = [...somePeople, ...otherPeople, ...morePeople];
const allGroups = [somePeople, otherPeople, morePeople];

// Example Usage
const intersection = allGroups
  .reduce(intersect, allPeople)
  .reduce(removeDuplicates, []);

intersection; // [jill]

Benefits:

  • dirt simple
  • data-centric
  • works for arbitrary number of lists
  • works for arbitrary lengths of lists
  • works for arbitrary types of values
  • works for arbitrary sort order
  • retains shape (order of first appearance in any array)
  • exits early where possible
  • memory safe, short of tampering with Function / Array prototypes

Drawbacks:

  • higher memory usage
  • higher CPU usage
  • requires an understanding of reduce
  • requires understanding of data flow

You wouldn't want to use this for 3D engine or kernel work, but if you have problems getting this to run in an event-based app, your design has bigger problems.

1
  • .some(x => x === item) is a complicated way to write .includes(item), and .reduce(removeDuplicates, []) is a complicated way to write a flatten + unique. This also probably gets slow faster than you think it does (easily relevant for event-based apps).
    – Ry-
    Jun 15, 2020 at 16:23
2

I'll contribute with what has been working out best for me:

if (!Array.prototype.intersect){
Array.prototype.intersect = function (arr1) {

    var r = [], o = {}, l = this.length, i, v;
    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        o[this[i]] = true;
    }
    l = arr1.length;
    for (i = 0; i < l; i++) {
        v = arr1[i];
        if (v in o) {
            r.push(v);
        }
    }
    return r;
};
}
2

A functional approach with ES2015

A functional approach must consider using only pure functions without side effects, each of which is only concerned with a single job.

These restrictions enhance the composability and reusability of the functions involved.

// small, reusable auxiliary functions

const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));
const apply = f => x => f(x);


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];


// run it

console.log( intersect(xs) (ys) );

Please note that the native Set type is used, which has an advantageous lookup performance.

Avoid duplicates

Obviously repeatedly occurring items from the first Array are preserved, while the second Array is de-duplicated. This may be or may be not the desired behavior. If you need a unique result just apply dedupe to the first argument:

// auxiliary functions

const apply = f => x => f(x);
const comp = f => g => x => f(g(x));
const afrom = apply(Array.from);
const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// de-duplication

const dedupe = comp(afrom) (createSet);


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];


// unique result

console.log( intersect(dedupe(xs)) (ys) );

Compute the intersection of any number of Arrays

If you want to compute the intersection of an arbitrarily number of Arrays just compose intersect with foldl. Here is a convenience function:

// auxiliary functions

const apply = f => x => f(x);
const uncurry = f => (x, y) => f(x) (y);
const createSet = xs => new Set(xs);
const filter = f => xs => xs.filter(apply(f));
const foldl = f => acc => xs => xs.reduce(uncurry(f), acc);


// intersection

const intersect = xs => ys => {
  const zs = createSet(ys);
  return filter(x => zs.has(x)
     ? true
     : false
  ) (xs);
};


// intersection of an arbitrarily number of Arrays

const intersectn = (head, ...tail) => foldl(intersect) (head) (tail);


// mock data

const xs = [1,2,2,3,4,5];
const ys = [0,1,2,3,3,3,6,7,8,9];
const zs = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6];


// run

console.log( intersectn(xs, ys, zs) );

3
  • 1
    Impressively functional: had to do a double-take to confirm that's not Haskell. The only nitpick is: (expr ? true : false) is redundant. Use just expr if actual booleans aren't needed, just truthy/falsy. Nov 28, 2017 at 17:48
  • Pointlessly complicated, and intersectn is inefficient. This is the wrong way to write reusable functions.
    – Ry-
    Jun 15, 2020 at 16:46
  • This answer deserves a more thoughtful critique than "pointlessly complicated". If someone stands to be influenced by it, then a comment amounting to "wrong" can only introduce confusion.
    – Corey
    Dec 7, 2020 at 7:37
2

.reduce to build a map, and .filter to find the intersection. delete within the .filter allows us to treat the second array as though it's a unique set.

function intersection (a, b) {
  var seen = a.reduce(function (h, k) {
    h[k] = true;
    return h;
  }, {});

  return b.filter(function (k) {
    var exists = seen[k];
    delete seen[k];
    return exists;
  });
}

I find this approach pretty easy to reason about. It performs in constant time.

2

I have written an intesection function which can even detect intersection of array of objects based on particular property of those objects.

For instance,

if arr1 = [{id: 10}, {id: 20}]
and arr2 =  [{id: 20}, {id: 25}]

and we want intersection based on the id property, then the output should be :

[{id: 20}]

As such, the function for the same (note: ES6 code) is :

const intersect = (arr1, arr2, accessors = [v => v, v => v]) => {
    const [fn1, fn2] = accessors;
    const set = new Set(arr2.map(v => fn2(v)));
    return arr1.filter(value => set.has(fn1(value)));
};

and you can call the function as:

intersect(arr1, arr2, [elem => elem.id, elem => elem.id])

Also note: this function finds intersection considering the first array is the primary array and thus the intersection result will be that of the primary array.

1

Here is underscore.js implementation:

_.intersection = function(array) {
  if (array == null) return [];
  var result = [];
  var argsLength = arguments.length;
  for (var i = 0, length = array.length; i < length; i++) {
    var item = array[i];
    if (_.contains(result, item)) continue;
    for (var j = 1; j < argsLength; j++) {
      if (!_.contains(arguments[j], item)) break;
    }
    if (j === argsLength) result.push(item);
  }
  return result;
};

Source: http://underscorejs.org/docs/underscore.html#section-62

1
1

Create an Object using one array and loop through the second array to check if the value exists as key.

function intersection(arr1, arr2) {
  var myObj = {};
  var myArr = [];
  for (var i = 0, len = arr1.length; i < len; i += 1) {
    if(myObj[arr1[i]]) {
      myObj[arr1[i]] += 1; 
    } else {
      myObj[arr1[i]] = 1;
    }
  }
  for (var j = 0, len = arr2.length; j < len; j += 1) {
    if(myObj[arr2[j]] && myArr.indexOf(arr2[j]) === -1) {
      myArr.push(arr2[j]);
    }
  }
  return myArr;
}
1

This function avoids the N^2 problem, taking advantage of the power of dictionaries. Loops through each array only once, and a third and shorter loop to return the final result. It also supports numbers, strings, and objects.

function array_intersect(array1, array2) 
{
    var mergedElems = {},
        result = [];

    // Returns a unique reference string for the type and value of the element
    function generateStrKey(elem) {
        var typeOfElem = typeof elem;
        if (typeOfElem === 'object') {
            typeOfElem += Object.prototype.toString.call(elem);
        }
        return [typeOfElem, elem.toString(), JSON.stringify(elem)].join('__');
    }

    array1.forEach(function(elem) {
        var key = generateStrKey(elem);
        if (!(key in mergedElems)) {
            mergedElems[key] = {elem: elem, inArray2: false};
        }
    });

    array2.forEach(function(elem) {
        var key = generateStrKey(elem);
        if (key in mergedElems) {
            mergedElems[key].inArray2 = true;
        }
    });

    Object.values(mergedElems).forEach(function(elem) {
        if (elem.inArray2) {
            result.push(elem.elem);
        }
    });

    return result;
}

If there is a special case that cannot be solved, just by modifying the generateStrKey function, it could surely be solved. The trick of this function is that it uniquely represents each different data according to type and value.


This variant has some performance improvements. Avoid loops in case any array is empty. It also starts by walking through the shorter array first, so if it finds all the values of the first array in the second array, exits the loop.

function array_intersect(array1, array2) 
{
    var mergedElems = {},
        result = [],
        firstArray, secondArray,
        firstN = 0, 
        secondN = 0;

    function generateStrKey(elem) {
        var typeOfElem = typeof elem;
        if (typeOfElem === 'object') {
            typeOfElem += Object.prototype.toString.call(elem);
        }
        return [typeOfElem, elem.toString(), JSON.stringify(elem)].join('__');
    }

    // Executes the loops only if both arrays have values
    if (array1.length && array2.length) 
    {
        // Begins with the shortest array to optimize the algorithm
        if (array1.length < array2.length) {
            firstArray = array1;
            secondArray = array2;
        } else {
            firstArray = array2;
            secondArray = array1;            
        }

        firstArray.forEach(function(elem) {
            var key = generateStrKey(elem);
            if (!(key in mergedElems)) {
                mergedElems[key] = {elem: elem, inArray2: false};
                // Increases the counter of unique values in the first array
                firstN++;
            }
        });

        secondArray.some(function(elem) {
            var key = generateStrKey(elem);
            if (key in mergedElems) {
                if (!mergedElems[key].inArray2) {
                    mergedElems[key].inArray2 = true;
                    // Increases the counter of matches
                    secondN++;
                    // If all elements of first array have coincidence, then exits the loop
                    return (secondN === firstN);
                }
            }
        });

        Object.values(mergedElems).forEach(function(elem) {
            if (elem.inArray2) {
                result.push(elem.elem);
            }
        });
    }

    return result;
}
2
  • What’s the purpose of Object.prototype.toString.call(/f/) (equivalent to "[object RegExp]")?
    – Ry-
    May 31, 2021 at 19:50
  • Sorry, a small residual error. Corrected! is Object.prototype.toString.call(elem) allows to preserve different keys for elements of type object that have same toString() output
    – M Muller
    May 31, 2021 at 21:51
1

I think using an object internally can help with computations and could be performant too.

// Approach maintains a count of each element and works for negative elements too

function intersect(a,b){
    
    const A = {};
    a.forEach((v)=>{A[v] ? ++A[v] : A[v] = 1});
    const B = {};
    b.forEach((v)=>{B[v] ? ++B[v] : B[v] = 1});
    const C = {};
    Object.entries(A).map((x)=>C[x[0]] = Math.min(x[1],B[x[0]]))
    return Object.entries(C).map((x)=>Array(x[1]).fill(Number(x[0]))).flat();
}
const x = [1,1,-1,-1,0,0,2,2];
const y = [2,0,1,1,1,1,0,-1,-1,-1];
const result = intersect(x,y);
console.log(result);  // (7) [0, 0, 1, 1, 2, -1, -1]
1

I am using map even object could be used.

//find intersection of 2 arrs
const intersections = (arr1,arr2) => {
  let arrf = arr1.concat(arr2)
  let map = new Map();
  let union = [];
  for(let i=0; i<arrf.length; i++){
    if(map.get(arrf[i])){
      map.set(arrf[i],false);
    }else{
      map.set(arrf[i],true);
    }
  }
 map.forEach((v,k)=>{if(!v){union.push(k);}})
 return union;
}
1
  • A code-only answer is not high quality. While this code may be useful, you can improve it by saying why it works, how it works, when it should be used, and what its limitations are. Please edit your answer to include explanation and link to relevant documentation. Oct 12, 2021 at 22:48
0

I extended tarulen's answer to work with any number of arrays. It also should work with non-integer values.

function intersect() { 
    const last = arguments.length - 1;
    var seen={};
    var result=[];
    for (var i = 0; i < last; i++)   {
        for (var j = 0; j < arguments[i].length; j++)  {
            if (seen[arguments[i][j]])  {
                seen[arguments[i][j]] += 1;
            }
            else if (!i)    {
                seen[arguments[i][j]] = 1;
            }
        }
    }
    for (var i = 0; i < arguments[last].length; i++) {
        if ( seen[arguments[last][i]] === last)
            result.push(arguments[last][i]);
        }
    return result;
}
0

If your arrays are sorted, this should run in O(n), where n is min( a.length, b.length )

function intersect_1d( a, b ){
    var out=[], ai=0, bi=0, acurr, bcurr, last=Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER;
    while( ( acurr=a[ai] )!==undefined && ( bcurr=b[bi] )!==undefined ){
        if( acurr < bcurr){
            if( last===acurr ){
                out.push( acurr );
            }
            last=acurr;
            ai++;
        }
        else if( acurr > bcurr){
            if( last===bcurr ){
                out.push( bcurr );
            }
            last=bcurr;
            bi++;
        }
        else {
            out.push( acurr );
            last=acurr;
            ai++;
            bi++;
        }
    }
    return out;
}
0

var arrays = [
    [1, 2, 3],
    [2, 3, 4, 5]
]
function commonValue (...arr) {
    let res = arr[0].filter(function (x) {
        return arr.every((y) => y.includes(x))
    })
    return res;
}
commonValue(...arrays);

0
function intersectionOfArrays(arr1, arr2) {
    return arr1.filter((element) => arr2.indexOf(element) !== -1).filter((element, pos, self) => self.indexOf(element) == pos);
}

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