41

4 items:

A
B
C
D

6 unique pairs possible:

AB
AC
AD
BC
BD
CD

What if I have 100 starting items? How many unique pairs are there? Is there a formula I can throw this into?

closed as off-topic by TylerH, Paul Roub, EdChum, Nick A the Popcorn King, too honest for this site May 14 '18 at 14:06

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it does not appear to be about programming, but rather about math in general. – TylerH May 14 '18 at 14:02
  • (n(n-1))/2 where n is the number of elements i.e. in your case 4 so (n(n-1))/2 = 6 – makis Jul 15 at 7:53
61

What you're looking for is n choose k. Basically:

enter image description here

For every pair of 100 items, you'd have 4,950 combinations - provided order doesn't matter (AB and BA are considered a single combination) and you don't want to repeat (AA is not a valid pair).

  • 4
    Help me I'm dumb - can you throw 100 items into that equation to teach me – Kirk Ouimet Sep 17 '13 at 20:41
  • 13
    n would be the number of items (100 in your case), and k would be the number of elements in each set (2 in your case). – Mike Christensen Sep 17 '13 at 20:45
  • 1
    Awesome, thanks Mike! – Kirk Ouimet Sep 17 '13 at 20:45
  • 5
    No problem. I think most modern programming languages have combination functions built in. You can also use the function =COMBIN(100,2) if you have Excel handy. – Mike Christensen Sep 17 '13 at 20:54
  • 3
    Here's an online one – Conrad Frix Sep 17 '13 at 20:54
46

TLDR; The formula is n(n-1)/2 where n is the number of items in the set.

Explanation:

To find the number of unique pairs in a set, where the pairs are subject to the commutative property (AB = BA), you can calculate the summation of 1 + 2 + ... + (n-1) where n is the number of items in the set.

The reasoning is as follows, say you have 4 items:

A
B
C
D

The number of items that can be paired with A is 3, or n-1:

AB
AC
AD

It follows that the number of items that can be paired with B is n-2 (because B has already been paired with A):

BC
BD

and so on...

(n-1) + (n-2) + ... + (n-(n-1))

which is the same as

1 + 2 + ... + (n-1)

or

n(n-1)/2
  • Isn't this the same as (n-1)! – Baodad Dec 13 '17 at 3:16
  • This is not the same as (n-1)! Which escalates much quicker. This is similar to a Triangle number though, whose formula is (n+1)n/2 (the series is positionally off by one). (n-1)n/2 for n=1,2,3,... = 0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, ... – Marques Johansson Jul 5 '18 at 17:44
34

This is how you can approach these problems in general on your own:

The first of the pair can be picked in N (=100) ways. You don't want to pick this item again, so the second of the pair can be picked in N-1 (=99) ways. In total you can pick 2 items out of N in N(N-1) (= 100*99=9900) different ways.

But hold on, this way you count also different orderings: AB and BA are both counted. Since every pair is counted twice you have to divide N(N-1) by two (the number of ways that you can order a list of two items). The number of subsets of two that you can make with a set of N is then N(N-1)/2 (= 9900/2 = 4950).

2

I was solving this algorithm and get stuck with the pairs part.

This explanation help me a lot https://betterexplained.com/articles/techniques-for-adding-the-numbers-1-to-100/

So to calculate the sum of series of numbers:

n(n+1)/2

But you need to calculate this

1 + 2 + ... + (n-1)

So in order to get this you can use

n(n+1)/2 - n

that is equal to

n(n-1)/2

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.