80

4 items:

A
B
C
D

6 unique pairs possible:

AB
AC
AD
BC
BD
CD

What if I have 100 starting items? How many unique pairs are there? Is there a formula I can throw this into?

2
  • 6
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it does not appear to be about programming, but rather about math in general.
    – TylerH
    May 14, 2018 at 14:02
  • 1
    (n(n-1))/2 where n is the number of elements i.e. in your case 4 so (n(n-1))/2 = 6
    – seralouk
    Jul 15, 2019 at 7:53

4 Answers 4

119

TLDR; The formula is n(n-1)/2 where n is the number of items in the set.

Explanation:

To find the number of unique pairs in a set, where the pairs are subject to the commutative property (AB = BA), you can calculate the summation of 1 + 2 + ... + (n-1) where n is the number of items in the set.

The reasoning is as follows, say you have 4 items:

A
B
C
D

The number of items that can be paired with A is 3, or n-1:

AB
AC
AD

It follows that the number of items that can be paired with B is n-2 (because B has already been paired with A):

BC
BD

and so on...

(n-1) + (n-2) + ... + (n-(n-1))

which is the same as

1 + 2 + ... + (n-1)

or

n(n-1)/2
3
  • Isn't this the same as (n-1)!
    – Baodad
    Dec 13, 2017 at 3:16
  • 3
    This is not the same as (n-1)! Which escalates much quicker. This is similar to a Triangle number though, whose formula is (n+1)n/2 (the series is positionally off by one). (n-1)n/2 for n=1,2,3,... = 0, 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, ... Jul 5, 2018 at 17:44
  • (n (n+1) / 2) - n = ((n^2 + n) /2) - n = (n^2 + n - 2n) / 2 = (n^2 - n) / 2 = n(n - 1) / 2 Apr 3, 2020 at 9:04
84

What you're looking for is n choose k. Basically:

enter image description here

For every pair of 100 items, you'd have 4,950 combinations - provided order doesn't matter (AB and BA are considered a single combination) and you don't want to repeat (AA is not a valid pair).

7
  • 7
    Help me I'm dumb - can you throw 100 items into that equation to teach me Sep 17, 2013 at 20:41
  • 18
    n would be the number of items (100 in your case), and k would be the number of elements in each set (2 in your case). Sep 17, 2013 at 20:45
  • 1
    Awesome, thanks Mike! Sep 17, 2013 at 20:45
  • 7
    No problem. I think most modern programming languages have combination functions built in. You can also use the function =COMBIN(100,2) if you have Excel handy. Sep 17, 2013 at 20:54
  • 4
    Here's an online one Sep 17, 2013 at 20:54
45

This is how you can approach these problems in general on your own:

The first of the pair can be picked in N (=100) ways. You don't want to pick this item again, so the second of the pair can be picked in N-1 (=99) ways. In total you can pick 2 items out of N in N(N-1) (= 100*99=9900) different ways.

But hold on, this way you count also different orderings: AB and BA are both counted. Since every pair is counted twice you have to divide N(N-1) by two (the number of ways that you can order a list of two items). The number of subsets of two that you can make with a set of N is then N(N-1)/2 (= 9900/2 = 4950).

12

I was solving this algorithm and get stuck with the pairs part.

This explanation help me a lot https://betterexplained.com/articles/techniques-for-adding-the-numbers-1-to-100/

So to calculate the sum of series of numbers:

n(n+1)/2

But you need to calculate this

1 + 2 + ... + (n-1)

So in order to get this you can use

n(n+1)/2 - n

that is equal to

n(n-1)/2
1
  • 3
    came here from the same algorithm problem!
    – Eran Medan
    Feb 25, 2020 at 6:00

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