215

How can I loop through a List and grab each item?

I want the output to look like this:

Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", myMoney.amount, myMoney.type);

Here is my code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<Money> myMoney = new List<Money> 
    {
        new Money{amount = 10, type = "US"},
        new Money{amount = 20, type = "US"}
    };
}

class Money
{
    public int amount { get; set; }
    public string type { get; set; }
}

6 Answers 6

330

foreach:

foreach (var money in myMoney) {
    Console.WriteLine("Amount is {0} and type is {1}", money.amount, money.type);
}

MSDN Link

Alternatively, because it is a List<T>.. which implements an indexer method [], you can use a normal for loop as well.. although its less readble (IMO):

for (var i = 0; i < myMoney.Count; i++) {
    Console.WriteLine("Amount is {0} and type is {1}", myMoney[i].amount, myMoney[i].type);
}
3
  • 7
    @awudoin What? No it doesn't.. it creates a reference on the stack.. other than that, it doesn't. A foreach doesn't clone the objects.. Sep 18, 2013 at 4:32
  • 2
    I should clarify: It also creates an Enumerator.. which is a struct.. which is also on the stack. So I still don't quite get what you were getting at with your comment. Sep 18, 2013 at 4:43
  • 8
    You're right....it is just an Enumerator and not a copy of the object. But the fact remains, depending on what you're doing there is more overhead with a foreach loop vs. a for loop. I just ran a quick test with your code with 100,000 entries in the List and the foreach loop took twice as long (actually 1.9 times as long). This isn't necessarily true in all situations, but in many. It depends on the size of the List, how many operations you do within the loop, etc.... This was what I was getting at.
    – awudoin
    Sep 19, 2013 at 3:35
40

Just for completeness, there is also the LINQ/Lambda way:

myMoney.ForEach((theMoney) => Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", theMoney.amount, theMoney.type));
2
  • This is much cleaner
    – jet_choong
    Oct 5, 2020 at 2:13
  • @jet_choong That is a personal opinion. Mine is that it is not clearer than either foreach or for.
    – Maarten
    Apr 21, 2021 at 10:52
22

Just like any other collection. With the addition of the List<T>.ForEach method.

foreach (var item in myMoney)
    Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", item.amount, item.type);

for (int i = 0; i < myMoney.Count; i++)
    Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", myMoney[i].amount, myMoney[i].type);

myMoney.ForEach(item => Console.WriteLine("amount is {0}, and type is {1}", item.amount, item.type));
2
  • 7
    Another word of warning, if you have a big list, (by big I mean over 100,000 items) myMoney.Count start to take a while as it has to traverse the list to perform the Count, and in the for examples above the myMoney.Count is counted every time around the loop. So using int myMoneyC=myMoney.Count; for(int i=0;i < myMoneyC; i++) will make this loop many times faster.
    – SuperGSJ
    Jun 3, 2017 at 14:26
  • @SuperGSJ Have you tested this? I would expect that it is optimized when you compile for release.
    – Maarten
    Apr 21, 2021 at 10:53
14

This is how I would write using more functional way. Here is the code:

new List<Money>()
{
     new Money() { Amount = 10, Type = "US"},
     new Money() { Amount = 20, Type = "US"}
}
.ForEach(money =>
{
    Console.WriteLine($"amount is {money.Amount}, and type is {money.Type}");
});
1
  • 2
    Thanks. This is very short way to achieve this task. You have also used the new and compact syntax of writeLine that was introduced in VS 2017/ .NET 4.7.
    – Deep
    Dec 10, 2017 at 3:49
1

The low level iterator manipulate code:

List<Money> myMoney = new List<Money>
{
    new Money{amount = 10, type = "US"},
    new Money{amount = 20, type = "US"}
};
using (var enumerator = myMoney.GetEnumerator())
{
    while (enumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        var element = enumerator.Current;
        Console.WriteLine(element.amount);
    }
}
2
  • Should be noted that if the List is changed, you will get "Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute." with this method.
    – Mecanik
    Feb 8, 2021 at 10:33
  • 2
    @NorbertBoros Not just this method, but any method which enumerates the list (e.g. foreach), and the list changes, will throw the same exception. A for loop does not enumerate the list.
    – Maarten
    Apr 21, 2021 at 10:51
0

You can also do it using the while loop

   int ctr = 0;
   while (ctr <= myMoney.Count - 1)
   {
       var data = myMoney[ctr];
       Console.WriteLine($"{data.amount} - {data.type}");
       ctr++;
   }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.