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This question already has an answer here:

I am self teaching myself python 2.7. I have some experience in using BATCH, which has a GOTO statement. How do I do that in python? For example, suppose I want to jump from line 5 to line 18.

I realize there have been previous questions regarding this topic, but I have not found them sufficiently informative or, are too high level in python for my current understanding.

marked as duplicate by kojiro, mgilson, tpg2114, sebastian-c, csgillespie Sep 18 '13 at 8:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    @kojiro Please read the whole topic. – Calder Hutchins Sep 18 '13 at 3:28
  • "One of thme mentioned a function, but i don't see how they would work." Understand how functions work, then you will see that you don't need goto. – Akavall Sep 18 '13 at 3:28
  • ok, I'll go do that Akavall – Calder Hutchins Sep 18 '13 at 3:30
  • 4
    Random: If you really do want to use a goto, somebody actually wrote a working version as part of an April Fool's joke in 2004. By no means do I recommend actually using it, but I thought I'd link it for amusement's sake. – Michael0x2a Sep 18 '13 at 3:51
  • I think whatever is the case, You must handle it by using while loop. – shubham12511 Apr 24 '17 at 12:50
56

Gotos are universally reviled in computer science and programming as they lead to very unstructured code.

Python (like almost every programming language today) supports structured programming which controls flow using if/then/else, loop and subroutines.

The key to thinking in a structured way is to understand how and why you are branching on code.

For example, lets pretend Python had a goto and corresponding label statement shudder. Look at the following code. In it if a number is greater than or equal to 0 we print if it

number = input()
if number < 0: goto negative
if number % 2 == 0:
   print "even"
else:
   print "odd"
goto end
label: negative
print "negative"
label: end
print "all done"

If we want to know when a piece of code is executed, we need to carefully traceback in the program, and examine how a label was arrived at - which is something that can't really be done.

For example, we can rewrite the above as:

number = input()
goto check

label: negative
print "negative"
goto end

label: check
if number < 0: goto negative
if number % 2 == 0:
   print "even"
else:
   print "odd"
goto end

label: end
print "all done"

Here, there are two possible ways to arrive at the "end", and we can't know which one was chosen. As programs get large this kind of problem gets worse and results in spaghetti code

In comparison, below is how you would write this program in Python:

number = input()
if number >= 0:
   if number % 2 == 0:
       print "even"
   else:
       print "odd"
else:
   print "negative"
print "all done"

I can look at a particular line of code, and know under what conditions it is met by tracing back the tree of if/then/else blocks it is in. For example, I know that the line print "odd" will be run when a ((number >= 0) == True) and ((number % 2 == 0) == False).

  • 2
    +1, Your explanation was great, and all of the code looks good, but as the scripts get bigger and bigger, you may not be able to deal with a negative in a single line. if/else begins piling up with indents off the screen. It may be better then if in this example you take the input, call check(), and in check(), call negative() if we've found the number to be negative. Furthermore, this would show how easy it is to take labels and go straight to functions (which our OP doesn't seem to entirely grasp) – scohe001 Sep 18 '13 at 3:43
  • 1
    @LegoStormtroopr I understand, that's why I'm trying to tell you to teach the OP about using functions to avoid that now in a simple example like this before you send another one of those programmers out into the fray (as I said before, he doesn't seem to have very much of a grasp on functions) – scohe001 Sep 18 '13 at 3:49
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    gotos are universally reviled in computer science and programming”—not quite. goto is perfect for error handling in C (eschewing RAII and exceptions), and for implementing structured programming constructs. Absolute statements are always—well, often—misguided. – Jon Purdy Sep 18 '13 at 7:16
  • 1
    I won't go against the universally accepted opinion that "goto is bad" (although I personally don't believe it), but I have to bring up a simple, also universal, fact: All executable codes, from all languages, result to machine (assembly) code, which is actually based on jumps! I am an assembly programmer and I never had a problem tracing back a jump and find the condition that had led to it, even if the source code wasn't mine. – Apostolos Jan 14 '18 at 17:57
  • 3
    Try writing command parsers and methods that take config inputs that can lead to many different combination of possible code paths and you will realize why GOTO / JUMP are the best fit for such situations. GOTO allows you to write the cleanest code in such situations. Lets not be so dogmatic. – rjha94 Mar 10 '18 at 11:42
53

Forgive me - I couldn't resist ;-)

def goto(linenum):
    global line
    line = linenum

line = 1
while True:
    if line == 1:
        response = raw_input("yes or no? ")
        if response == "yes":
            goto(2)
        elif response == "no":
            goto(3)
        else:
            goto(100)
    elif line == 2:
        print "Thank you for the yes!"
        goto(20)
    elif line == 3:
        print "Thank you for the no!"
        goto(20)
    elif line == 20:
        break
    elif line == 100:
        print "You're annoying me - answer the question!"
        goto(1)
  • 3
    Hmm interesting, +1 – Calder Hutchins Sep 18 '13 at 3:47
  • 33
    LOL! Calder, it's a joke. It's possible to write horrible code in any language ;-) – Tim Peters Sep 18 '13 at 3:47
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    PLEASE DO IMPLEMENT COME FROM NEXT? – msw Sep 18 '13 at 3:48
  • 1
    lol tim i know it was a joke :p – Calder Hutchins Sep 18 '13 at 4:06
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    Wouldn't it be more pythonic to keep a dict of line numbers to functions? Like this maybe. Or would it be better to make end raise something? – abarnert Sep 24 '13 at 0:15
34

I entirely agree that goto is poor poor coding, but no one has actually answered the question. There is in fact a goto module for Python (though it was released as an April fool joke and is not recommended to be used, it does work).

  • as of Python 2.6.9 it does not work anymore... – fortran Aug 12 '14 at 15:34
  • Continuation passing style requires goto (in the guise of function calls). – Erik Haliewicz Feb 11 '15 at 20:56
9

There's no goto instruction in the Python programming language. You'll have to write your code in a structured way... But really, why do you want to use a goto? that's been considered harmful for decades, and any program you can think of can be written without using goto.

Of course, there are some cases where an unconditional jump might be useful, but it's never mandatory, there will always exist a semantically equivalent, structured solution that doesn't need goto.

  • 1
    Thank-you, I wanted to use it to: python askes the user a question and if the raw input is not yes or no it will ask another question about what the user meant. Then it would go back to the line before the question was asked. – Calder Hutchins Sep 18 '13 at 3:27
  • @CalderHutchins Can you explain what you mean by if it's not yes or not it asks another question? – C0deH4cker Sep 18 '13 at 3:29
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    @CalderHutchins: That's trivial to do in a structured flow. There's no need to create any jumps to arbitrary lines. – Makoto Sep 18 '13 at 3:30
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    @CalderHutchins you don't need a goto for that, put the question inside a loop, if the answer is not valid then loop again until the input is right – Óscar López Sep 18 '13 at 3:30
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    well never need goto and there is always always structured equivalent is true enough for python, but that's something you couldn't truly write when including assembly languages in the scope. Also python still has break and return which are gotos in disguise, and Exceptions are also arguably gotos in disguise. – kriss Sep 18 '13 at 8:36
6

Disclaimer: I have been exposed to a significant amount of F77

The modern equivalent of goto (arguable, only my opinion, etc) is explicit exception handling:

Edited to highlight the code reuse better.

Pretend pseudocode in a fake python-like language with goto:

def myfunc1(x)
    if x == 0:
        goto LABEL1
    return 1/x

def myfunc2(z)
    if z == 0:
        goto LABEL1
    return 1/z

myfunc1(0) 
myfunc2(0)

:LABEL1
print 'Cannot divide by zero'.

Compared to python:

def myfunc1(x):
    return 1/x

def myfunc2(y):
    return 1/y


try:
    myfunc1(0)
    myfunc2(0)
except ZeroDivisionError:
    print 'Cannot divide by zero'

Explicit named exceptions are a significantly better way to deal with non-linear conditional branching.

  • 1
    That's not a bad way of thinking about the best possible use of non-local gotos – msw Sep 18 '13 at 3:51
  • Truth: >95% of GOTOs I have seen in the wild have been used for preemptive error handling. The other 5% have been clever tricks that resulted in horrific bugs, and the code, as-is, couldn't even be translated to a different goto-less language without requiring changes to the algorithm. – Caleb Hattingh Sep 18 '13 at 3:55
  • @crjh: I'm very interested in seeing codes with gotos that cannot be directly translated to goto-less language. Can you give me example? – justhalf Sep 18 '13 at 3:57
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    @justhalf I can't find the exact paper, but there is a proof that all programs that use goto can be rewritten to use while loops instead. Not cleanly mind you, but you can remove all gotos. – user764357 Sep 18 '13 at 4:19
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    @LegoStormtroopr: you should be addressing that to cjrh, haha But yeah, I guess the "not cleanly" part is what cjrh referred to as "requiring changes to the algorithm" – justhalf Sep 18 '13 at 4:24
4
answer = None
while True:
    answer = raw_input("Do you like pie?")
    if answer in ("yes", "no"): break
    print "That is not a yes or a no"

Would give you what you want with no goto statement.

  • 1
    This is not a good idea. While it technically correct, it makes the logic very difficult to untangle. – user764357 Sep 18 '13 at 5:10
  • 4
    It's better than goto. – William Shipley Mar 12 '14 at 21:31

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