54

I'm trying to run two functions simultaneously in Python. I have tried the below code which uses multiprocessing but when I execute the code, the second function starts only after the first is done.

from multiprocessing import Process
def func1:
     #does something

def func2:
     #does something

if __name__=='__main__':
     p1 = Process(target = func1)
     p1.start()
     p2 = Process(target = func2)
     p2.start()
4

6 Answers 6

71

You are doing it correctly. :)

Try running this silly piece of code:

from multiprocessing import Process
import sys

rocket = 0

def func1():
    global rocket
    print 'start func1'
    while rocket < sys.maxint:
        rocket += 1
    print 'end func1'

def func2():
    global rocket
    print 'start func2'
    while rocket < sys.maxint:
        rocket += 1
    print 'end func2'

if __name__=='__main__':
    p1 = Process(target = func1)
    p1.start()
    p2 = Process(target = func2)
    p2.start()

You will see it print 'start func1' and then 'start func2' and then after a (very) long time you will finally see the functions end. But they will indeed execute simultaneously.

Because processes take a while to start up, you may even see 'start func2' before 'start func1'.

2
  • Can someone please update this for python 3? May 27, 2021 at 21:06
  • is there any need to close process in this code? I feel the memory doesn't release after using Multiprocessing
    – mahshid.r
    Sep 20, 2021 at 10:10
34

This is just what i needed. I know it wasn't asked but i modified shashank's code to suit Python 3 for anyone else looking :)

from multiprocessing import Process
import sys

rocket = 0

def func1():
    global rocket
    print ('start func1')
    while rocket < sys.maxsize:
        rocket += 1
    print ('end func1')

def func2():
    global rocket
    print ('start func2')
    while rocket < sys.maxsize:
        rocket += 1
    print ('end func2')

if __name__=='__main__':
    p1 = Process(target=func1)
    p1.start()
    p2 = Process(target=func2)
    p2.start()

Substitute sys.maxsize for an number then print(rocket)and you can see it count up one at a time. Get to a number and stop

4
  • 2
    Any idea why this wouldn't do anything at all?
    – CapnShanty
    Nov 27, 2018 at 16:19
  • 3
    How can this be done using functions that take input arguments?
    – hirschme
    Jun 26, 2019 at 20:23
  • Something might be afoul in the library. I keep getting: AttributeError: module 'threading' has no attribute '_shutdown' Apr 17, 2020 at 17:29
  • 1
    @hirschme Follow up here. docs.python.org/3/library/multiprocessing.html You can use Process(target=nameOfFunction, args=(arg1, arg2, )) Sep 1, 2021 at 2:08
11

This can be done elegantly with Ray, a system that allows you to easily parallelize and distribute your Python code.

To parallelize your example, you'd need to define your functions with the @ray.remote decorator, and then invoke them with .remote.

import ray

ray.init()

# Define functions you want to execute in parallel using 
# the ray.remote decorator.
@ray.remote
def func1():
    #does something

@ray.remote
def func2():
    #does something

# Execute func1 and func2 in parallel.
ray.get([func1.remote(), func2.remote()])

If func1() and func2() return results, you need to rewrite the code as follows:

ret_id1 = func1.remote()
ret_id2 = func1.remote()
ret1, ret2 = ray.get([ret_id1, ret_id2])

There are a number of advantages of using Ray over the multiprocessing module. In particular, the same code will run on a single machine as well as on a cluster of machines. For more advantages of Ray see this related post.

3
  • 2
    Unfortunately for me, there is no ray distribution for windows.
    – JediCate
    Feb 15, 2019 at 9:34
  • This library is a piece of genius. Check out the walkthrough here: ray.readthedocs.io/en/latest/walkthrough.html. This reduces the overhead of trying to configure the pools and monitor the resources and provides automated methods to use available cpu and gpu resources. HIGHLY recommend! Apr 17, 2020 at 17:52
  • Unfortunately, it currently has a problem with class attributes, and so getter/setter methods, too :-( Dec 22, 2021 at 22:45
8

This is a very good example by @Shashank. I just want to say that I had to add join at the end, or else the two processes were not running simultaneously:

from multiprocessing import Process
import sys

rocket = 0

def func1():
    global rocket
    print 'start func1'
    while rocket < sys.maxint:
        rocket += 1
    print 'end func1'

def func2():
    global rocket
    print 'start func2'
    while rocket < sys.maxint:
        rocket += 1
    print 'end func2'

if __name__=='__main__':
    p1 = Process(target = func1)
    p1.start()
    p2 = Process(target = func2)
    p2.start()
    # This is where I had to add the join() function.
    p1.join()
    p2.join()

Furthermore, Check this thread out: When to call .join() on a process?

2
  • process.join was the missing part in almost all example script for multiprocessing, without this, the process is running sequentially, thanks for pointing this.
    – nish
    Nov 30, 2020 at 12:19
  • Suppose func1() requires an input argument. Can you please give an example on how to pass it? Apr 12, 2021 at 14:03
4

Here is another version, if a dynamic list of processes need to be run. I am including the two shell scripts, if you want to try it:

t1.sh

for i in {1..10}
  do 
     echo "1... t.sh i:"$i
     sleep 1
  done

t2.sh

   for i in {1..3}
   do
       echo "2.. t2.sh i:"$i
       sleep 1
   done

np.py

import os
from multiprocessing import Process, Lock

def f(l, cmd):
    os.system(cmd)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    lock = Lock()

    for cmd in ['sh t1.sh', 'sh t2.sh']:
        Process(target=f, args=(lock, cmd)).start()

output

1... t.sh i:1
2.. t2.sh i:1
1... t.sh i:2
2.. t2.sh i:2
1... t.sh i:3
2.. t2.sh i:3
1... t.sh i:4
1... t.sh i:5
1... t.sh i:6
1... t.sh i:7
1... t.sh i:8
1... t.sh i:9
1... t.sh i:10

"lock" left there can be acquired before task "l.acquire()" and released after "l.release()"

0
#Try by using threads instead of multiprocessing

#from multiprocessing import Process
#import sys

import time
import threading
import random

rocket = 0

def func1():
    global rocket
    print('start func1')
    while rocket < 100:
        print("Im in func1")
        rocket += 1
        value = "Im global var "+str(rocket)+" from fun1"
        print(value)

    print ('end func1')

def func2():
    global rocket
    print ('start func2')
    while rocket < 100:
        print("Im in func2")
        rocket += 1
        value = "Im global var " + str(rocket) + " from fun2"
        print(value)
    print ('end func2')

if __name__=='__main__':
    p1 = threading.Thread(target=func1)
    p2 = threading.Thread(target=func2)
    p1.start();p2.start()

#Hope it works
2
  • Read How do I write a good answer?
    – user13146129
    Mar 8, 2021 at 9:08
  • Threading and multiprocessing are totally two different things.
    – EMT
    Mar 17, 2022 at 9:08

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