394

I have a site as a remote Git repo pulling from Bitbucket.com using an SSH alias. I can manually start the ssh-agent on my server but I have to do this every time I login via SSH.

I manually start the ssh-agent:

eval ssh-agent $SHELL

Then I add the agent:

ssh-add ~/.ssh/bitbucket_id

Then it shows up when I do:

ssh-add -l

And I'm good to go. Is there any way to automate this process so I don't have to do it every time I login? The server is running RedHat 6.2 (Santiago).

12
  • 2
    Anything you want to do every time you login should in .profile (terminal logins) or .xinitrc (for GUI logins).
    – Barmar
    Sep 18, 2013 at 18:50
  • 1
    Ah! I was using .bash_profile... What's the difference between .profile and .bash_profile? Sep 18, 2013 at 18:54
  • 14
    .bash_profile is specific to bash, .profile is generic to all POSIX shells. bash will look first for .bash_profile, then default to .profile.
    – Barmar
    Sep 18, 2013 at 20:54
  • 6
    The correct way to spawn ssh-agent for a "standard" (POSIX-compatible) shell is eval $(ssh-agent -s). Note also that you have to make sure you properly get rid of the agent when you log out, so it's also advisable to put trap 'kill $SSH_AGENT_PID' EXIT in your .profile after the line which starts the agent.
    – kostix
    Sep 19, 2013 at 10:16
  • 3
    I’m voting to close this question because it is better suited to the Unix SE site where there's a better answer: unix.stackexchange.com/questions/90853/…
    – icc97
    Jan 14, 2021 at 11:41

12 Answers 12

493

Please go through this article. You may find this very useful:

https://web.archive.org/web/20210506080335/https://mah.everybody.org/docs/ssh

Just in case the above link vanishes some day, I am capturing the main piece of the solution below:

This solution from Joseph M. Reagle by way of Daniel Starin:

Add this following to your .bash_profile

SSH_ENV="$HOME/.ssh/agent-environment"

function start_agent {
    echo "Initialising new SSH agent..."
    /usr/bin/ssh-agent | sed 's/^echo/#echo/' > "${SSH_ENV}"
    echo succeeded
    chmod 600 "${SSH_ENV}"
    . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
    /usr/bin/ssh-add;
}

# Source SSH settings, if applicable

if [ -f "${SSH_ENV}" ]; then
    . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
    #ps ${SSH_AGENT_PID} doesn't work under cywgin
    ps -ef | grep ${SSH_AGENT_PID} | grep ssh-agent$ > /dev/null || {
        start_agent;
    }
else
    start_agent;
fi

This version is especially nice since it will see if you've already started ssh-agent and, if it can't find it, will start it up and store the settings so that they'll be usable the next time you start up a shell.

20
  • 17
    Machine restart is not necessary. You can just reload .bash_profile using source ~/.bash_profile in your current shell session. Machine restart will also work because that will load the new config anyway.
    – Litmus
    Jul 16, 2014 at 8:49
  • 14
    Use SSH_ENV="$HOME/.ssh/env" (i.e. just not /environment) Why? sshd uses ~/.ssh/environment (see man page : PermitUserEnvironment). Github also recommend this in their solution - help.github.com/articles/… Sep 13, 2014 at 8:22
  • 7
    This script worked for me when I put it in my ~/.bashrc file (not my ~/.profile or ~/.bash_profile). The first time I open a local console it prompts for the passphrase, everything works from that point on without further prompting. Cheers. Feb 19, 2015 at 11:38
  • 3
    Adding the ssh-agent start command in .bashrc will make scp command not work.
    – Dzanvu
    Mar 18, 2015 at 8:14
  • 7
    Still annoying... you have to do this every time you log in... even if you don't use ssh. Need to make this fire off every time ssh is called... and ideally, you should be able to configure which hosts cause which keys to load. Jul 22, 2016 at 15:30
184

On Arch Linux, the following works really great (should work on all systemd-based distros):

Create a systemd user service, by putting the following to ~/.config/systemd/user/ssh-agent.service:

[Unit]
Description=SSH key agent

[Service]
Type=simple
Environment=SSH_AUTH_SOCK=%t/ssh-agent.socket
ExecStart=/usr/bin/ssh-agent -D -a $SSH_AUTH_SOCK

[Install]
WantedBy=default.target

Setup shell to have an environment variable for the socket (.bash_profile, .zshrc, ...):

export SSH_AUTH_SOCK="$XDG_RUNTIME_DIR/ssh-agent.socket"

Enable the service, so it'll be started automatically on login, and start it:

systemctl --user enable ssh-agent
systemctl --user start ssh-agent

Add the following configuration setting to your local ssh config file ~/.ssh/config (this works since SSH 7.2):

AddKeysToAgent  yes

This will instruct the ssh client to always add the key to a running agent, so there's no need to ssh-add it beforehand.

18
  • 4
    I found this comment while trying to do this in Ubuntu. It seems to play much more nicely with the built in systems than hacking something into the startup scripts, at least given my knowledge of how the system should work.
    – xiterion
    Jul 25, 2017 at 14:55
  • 3
    so is this solution basically installing/configuring a systemd service (but only for the user)? Jan 10, 2019 at 15:35
  • 3
    I like this answer because it uses the infrastructure specifically designed for running daemons (systemd) and not shell-script hacks with variables.
    – PeterT
    Nov 4, 2020 at 23:23
  • 2
    I think the solution is the best one. And it just has to be adopted by distros. see stackoverflow.com/questions/2419566/… if you want several keys to be tried automatically when connect to git
    – dev_null
    Dec 29, 2020 at 11:04
  • 1
    For those who, like me, cross-reference multiple sources before just implementing the first answer they find... This answer is consistent with wiki.archlinux.org/title/SSH_keys#SSH_agents Oct 2, 2021 at 23:14
154

Old question, but I did come across a similar situation. Don't think the above answer fully achieves what is needed. The missing piece is keychain; install it if it isn't already.

sudo apt-get install keychain

Then add the following line to your ~/.bashrc

eval $(keychain --eval id_rsa)

This will start the ssh-agent if it isn't running, connect to it if it is, load the ssh-agent environment variables into your shell, and load your ssh key.

Change id_rsa to whichever private key in ~/.ssh you want to load.

Some useful options for keychain:

  • -q Quiet mode
  • --noask Don't ask for the password upon start, but on demand when ssh key is actually used.

Reference

https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/90853/how-can-i-run-ssh-add-automatically-without-password-prompt

12
  • 3
    keychain does not work for me according to the instructions given. I added to .bash_profile and ssh still asks for password every time. i tried it multiple times in same shell. no dice. going back to basic ssh-agent approach Jul 23, 2014 at 20:12
  • 3
    This is the correct and simple solution. If you do not want to see the log when keychain command is executed, you can add -q option for quiet mode. More info about Keychain: funtoo.org/Keychain Jan 26, 2018 at 0:45
  • 9
    Thx, this is by far the most elegant solution.
    – greenspand
    Aug 3, 2018 at 18:01
  • 1
    @James The $(....) is better than using backticks! See stackoverflow.com/q/9449778/4805858 ...
    – SlySven
    Jun 12, 2020 at 4:26
  • 3
    This solution as it stands currently "eval $(keychain --eval id_rsa)" didn't work for me until I added "--agents ssh " parameter to keychain, as it is recommended in the linked solution.
    – il--ya
    Jan 24, 2021 at 19:59
43

Add this to your ~/.bashrc, then logout and back in to take effect.

if [ ! -S ~/.ssh/ssh_auth_sock ]; then
  eval `ssh-agent`
  ln -sf "$SSH_AUTH_SOCK" ~/.ssh/ssh_auth_sock
fi
export SSH_AUTH_SOCK=~/.ssh/ssh_auth_sock
ssh-add -l > /dev/null || ssh-add

This should only prompt for a password the first time you login after each reboot. It will keep reusing the same ssh-agent as long as it stays running.

5
  • 1
    What would we use instead if we had multiple keys and they weren't named ~/.ssh/id_rsa? It seems that the ssh-add part of your answer expects default file names for the keys. Jan 24, 2018 at 0:23
  • 1
    Yup. I believe you can just add the file names to to the very end of the last line if needed Jan 24, 2018 at 14:51
  • But you still cant automize a script do pull git stuff for example without entering password manually? How to avoid that?
    – trainoasis
    Aug 9, 2019 at 13:33
  • Some improvements could be done to this script: 1/ in place of creating a soft link we can ask ssh-agent to directly create the socket in our homedir with option -a ${SSH_AUTH_SOCK} (note that the export of var SSH_AUTH_SOCK need to be declare a bit before). 2/ in place of having the ssh-add prompting at the first login, you could add the AddKeysToAgent` to yes in your ssh config to add at the first ssh, so you will be prompted for your passphrase at first ssh connection not login. 3/ the eval notation could use $(ssh-agent) notation and ${SSH_AUTH_SOCK} for the shell var.
    – xenlo
    Mar 2, 2022 at 11:30
  • This works for me, and i use a dmenu for the prompt because i did the default x11-ssh-askpass. Can put a script containing a simple like dmenu -fn Monospace-18 -p "$1" <&- && echo and put it in your PATH. Then tell ssh to use this script instead by exporting SSH_ASKPASS=script Jul 3, 2022 at 9:06
41

The accepted solution have following drawbacks:

  • it is complicated to maintain;
  • it evaluates storage file which may lead to errors or security breach;
  • it starts agent but doesn't stop it which is close equivalent to leaving the key in ignition.

If your keys do not require to type password, I suggest following solution. Add the following to your .bash_profile very end (edit key list to your needs):

exec ssh-agent $BASH -s 10<&0 << EOF
    ssh-add ~/.ssh/your_key1.rsa \
            ~/.ssh/your_key2.rsa &> /dev/null
    exec $BASH <&10-
EOF

It have following advantages:

  • much simpler solution;
  • agent session ends when bash session ends.

It have possible disadvantages:

  • interactive ssh-add command will influence only one session, which is in fact an issue only in very untypical circumstances;
  • unusable if typing password is required;
  • started shell becomes non-login (which doesn't influence anything AFAIK).

Note that several ssh-agent processes is not a disadvantage, because they don't take more memory or CPU time.

7
  • I've got SSH keys in a directory outside of $HOME in Windows 10, using Git Bash. Changing the path to the RSA was all I needed to do to get this working. TYVM! Mar 18, 2016 at 4:58
  • 16
    I would argue that "If your keys do not require to type password" is close equivalent to leaving the key in ignition. Oct 3, 2016 at 22:51
  • At least, it is on your own host, not somewhere on the network.
    – midenok
    Oct 4, 2016 at 7:23
  • 1
    "I would argue that "If your keys do not require to type password" is close equivalent to leaving the key in ignition. " <-- Explain how so?? Because keys are far more flexible than passwords, far easier to revoke (what? You're only using keys for sudo users with full access? tsk tsk). Multiple sets of keys for multiple profiles of users. If you want to automate anything (like deployment, or end to end checks) then good luck constantly typing in passwords during "orchestration". May 10, 2017 at 14:37
  • 3
    Don't do that. Passwordless keys are a bad practice.
    – user48678
    Sep 28, 2017 at 1:58
13

Tried couple solutions from many sources but all seemed like too much trouble. Finally I found the easiest one :)

If you're not yet familiar with zsh and oh-my-zsh then install it. You will love it :)

Then edit .zshrc

vim ~/.zshrc

find plugins section and update it to use ssh-agent like so:

plugins=(ssh-agent git)

And that's all! You'll have ssh-agent up and running every time you start your shell

1
  • 2
    But not at login. zshrc is only sourced when the user opens a terminal
    – smac89
    Jun 1, 2021 at 15:44
9

Just to add yet another solution :P, I went with a combination of @spheenik and @collin-anderson 's solutions.

 # Ensure that we have an ssh config with AddKeysToAgent set to true
 if [ ! -f ~/.ssh/config ] || ! cat ~/.ssh/config | grep AddKeysToAgent | grep yes > /dev/null; then
     echo "AddKeysToAgent  yes" >> ~/.ssh/config
 fi
 # Ensure a ssh-agent is running so you only have to enter keys once
 if [ ! -S ~/.ssh/ssh_auth_sock ]; then
   eval `ssh-agent`
   ln -sf "$SSH_AUTH_SOCK" ~/.ssh/ssh_auth_sock
 fi
 export SSH_AUTH_SOCK=~/.ssh/ssh_auth_sock

Could be a little more elegant but its simple and readable. This solution:

  • ensures AddKeysToAgent yes is in your ssh config so keys will be automatically added upon use
  • doesn't prompt you to enter any passphrases at login (again, one-time passphrase entering occurs on first use)
  • silently starts an ssh-agent if it has not already started one

Comments welcome :)

3
  • 1
    This worked perfectly for me. On Kubuntu I put it in .profile.
    – Shai
    Apr 28, 2019 at 22:30
  • 1
    Good to know about the AddKeysToAgent yes setting. Thanks. Jun 26, 2019 at 13:55
  • This did not work for me, because the ! -S always evaluated to false even when ssh-agent had terminated. The script thus only worked once. Nov 21, 2020 at 21:42
8

So I used to use the approaches described above, but I kind of prefer the agent to die when my last bash session ends. This is a bit longer than the other solutions, but its my preferred approach. The basic idea is that the first bash session starts the ssh-agent. Then each additional bash session checks for the config file (~/.ssh/.agent_env). If that is there and there is a session running then source the environment and create a hardlink to the socket file in /tmp (needs to be on the same filesystem as the original socket file). As bash sessions shut down each deletes its own hardlink. The last session to close will find that the hardlinks have 2 links (the hardlink and the original), removal of the processes own socket and killing of the process will result in 0, leaving a clean environment after the last bash session closes.

# Start ssh-agent to keep you logged in with keys, use `ssh-add` to log in
agent=`pgrep ssh-agent -u $USER` # get only your agents           
if [[ "$agent" == "" || ! -e ~/.ssh/.agent_env ]]; then
    # if no agents or environment file is missing create a new one
    # remove old agents / environment variable files
    kill $agent running
    rm ~/.ssh/.agent_env 

    # restart
    eval `ssh-agent` 
    echo 'export SSH_AUTH_SOCK'=$SSH_AUTH_SOCK >> ~/.ssh/.agent_env             
    echo 'export SSH_AGENT_PID'=$SSH_AGENT_PID >> ~/.ssh/.agent_env             
fi

# create our own hardlink to the socket (with random name)           
source ~/.ssh/.agent_env                                                    
MYSOCK=/tmp/ssh_agent.${RANDOM}.sock                                        
ln -T $SSH_AUTH_SOCK $MYSOCK                                                
export SSH_AUTH_SOCK=$MYSOCK                                                

end_agent()                                                                     
{
    # if we are the last holder of a hardlink, then kill the agent
    nhard=`ls -l $SSH_AUTH_SOCK | awk '{print $2}'`                             
    if [[ "$nhard" -eq 2 ]]; then                                               
        rm ~/.ssh/.agent_env                                                    
        ssh-agent -k                                                            
    fi                                                                          
    rm $SSH_AUTH_SOCK                                                           
}                                                                               
trap end_agent EXIT                                                             
set +x              
3
  • if we run this as a BASH script on login of any other shell (other then BASH), it should work too, right?
    – hoijui
    Nov 9, 2019 at 6:35
  • I actually now just use keychain (see above)
    – Micah
    Jul 29, 2020 at 19:17
  • Could you please shortly explain the line kill $agent running? I understand what kill $agent means, but what does running mean? According to man kill, there is no such parameter. Otherwise, I like the principle of your solution. Quite elegant ...
    – Binarus
    Dec 20, 2021 at 18:46
4

Users of the fish shell can use this script to do the same thing.

# content has to be in .config/fish/config.fish
# if it does not exist, create the file
setenv SSH_ENV $HOME/.ssh/environment

function start_agent                                                                                                                                                                    
    echo "Initializing new SSH agent ..."
    ssh-agent -c | sed 's/^echo/#echo/' > $SSH_ENV
    echo "succeeded"
    chmod 600 $SSH_ENV 
    . $SSH_ENV > /dev/null
    ssh-add
end

function test_identities                                                                                                                                                                
    ssh-add -l | grep "The agent has no identities" > /dev/null
    if [ $status -eq 0 ]
        ssh-add
        if [ $status -eq 2 ]
            start_agent
        end
    end
end

if [ -n "$SSH_AGENT_PID" ] 
    ps -ef | grep $SSH_AGENT_PID | grep ssh-agent > /dev/null
    if [ $status -eq 0 ]
        test_identities
    end  
else
    if [ -f $SSH_ENV ]
        . $SSH_ENV > /dev/null
    end  
    ps -ef | grep $SSH_AGENT_PID | grep -v grep | grep ssh-agent > /dev/null
    if [ $status -eq 0 ]
        test_identities
    else 
        start_agent
    end  
end
0
4

I solved it by adding this to the /etc/profile - system wide (or to user local .profile, or .bash_profile):

# SSH-AGENT 
#!/usr/bin/env bash
SERVICE='ssh-agent'
WHOAMI=`whoami |awk '{print $1}'`

if pgrep -u $WHOAMI $SERVICE >/dev/null
then
    echo $SERVICE running.
else
    echo $SERVICE not running.
    echo starting
    ssh-agent > ~/.ssh/agent_env
fi
. ~/.ssh/agent_env

This starts a new ssh-agent if not running for the current user, or re-sets the ssh-agent env parameter if running.

2
  • Thank you for saying how to tell if the agent is already running! Apr 25, 2019 at 14:25
  • How does the if pgrep -u $WHOAMI $SERVICE >/dev/null work? Mar 6, 2020 at 7:12
2

I use the ssh-ident tool for this.

From its man-page:

ssh-ident - Start and use ssh-agent and load identities as necessary.

2

I like your answers a lot. It made working from cygwin / linux hosts a lot easier. I combined start and end functions to make it secure.

SSH_ENV="$HOME/.ssh/.agent_env"

function start_agent {
    echo "Initialising new SSH agent..."

    eval `/usr/bin/ssh-agent`
    echo 'export SSH_AUTH_SOCK'=$SSH_AUTH_SOCK >> ${SSH_ENV}
    echo 'export SSH_AGENT_PID'=$SSH_AGENT_PID >> ${SSH_ENV}

    echo succeeded
    chmod 600 "${SSH_ENV}"
    . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
    /usr/bin/ssh-add;
}

# Source SSH settings, if applicable
if [ -f "${SSH_ENV}" ]; then
    . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
    #ps ${SSH_AGENT_PID} doesn't work under cywgin
    ps -ef | grep ${SSH_AGENT_PID} | grep ssh-agent$ > /dev/null || {
        start_agent;
    }
else
    start_agent;
fi

# create our own hardlink to the socket (with random name)
MYSOCK=/tmp/ssh_agent.${RANDOM}.sock
ln -T $SSH_AUTH_SOCK $MYSOCK
export SSH_AUTH_SOCK=$MYSOCK

end_agent()
{
    # if we are the last holder of a hardlink, then kill the agent
    nhard=`ls -l $SSH_AUTH_SOCK | awk '{print $2}'`
    if [[ "$nhard" -eq 2 ]]; then
        rm ${SSH_ENV}
        /usr/bin/ssh-agent -k
    fi
    rm $SSH_AUTH_SOCK
}
trap end_agent EXIT
set +x
1
  • Great idea! Perhaps it would be more reliable though if you used the bash process' PID and the current user's name with $$ and ${USER} instead of ${RANDOM}? Also, the $(command) syntax is the new way to do command substitution. Jun 29, 2020 at 15:31

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