15

If I have an AngularJS directive without a template and I want it to set a property on the current scope, what is the best way to do it?

For example, a directive that counts button clicks:

<button twoway="counter">Click Me</button>
<p>Click Count: {{ counter }}</p>

With a directive that assigns the click count to the expression in the two way attribute:

.directive('twoway', [
'$parse',
  function($parse) {
    return {
      scope: false,
      link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {
        elem.on('click', function() {
          var current = scope.$eval(attrs.twoway) || 0;
          $parse(attrs.twoway).assign(scope, ++current);
          scope.$apply();
        });
      }
    };
  }
])

Is there a better way to do this? From what I've read, an isolated scope would be overkill, but do I need a child scope? And is there a cleaner way to write back to a scope variable defined in the directive attribute other than using $parse. I just feel like I'm making this too difficult.

Full Plunker here.

2
  • 2
    This question appears to be off-topic because it is about code review.
    – zs2020
    Sep 19, 2013 at 14:03
  • 2
    Or code architecture. I think it's a good question.
    – dudewad
    Sep 1, 2015 at 22:31

5 Answers 5

33

Why is an isolate scope overkill? its pretty useful for exactly this kind of thing:

  scope: {
     "twoway": "=" // two way binding
  },

This is a pretty idiomatic angular solution to this problem, so this is what I'd stick with.

2
  • Doug T. I was going off of this SO post, but I probably only understood a quarter of it. Sep 18, 2013 at 21:53
  • 39
    The critical addition to this answer is that the variable that you pass into this directive, e.g. counter, must be an object, e.g. obj.counter otherwise you won't get a proper reference to update the parent scope.
    – morloch
    Sep 29, 2014 at 6:16
25

I'm surprised no one has mentioned ng-model, the default directive for doing two-data binding. Maybe it's not so well known, but the linking function has a fourth parameter:

angular.module('directive-binding', [])
  .directive('twoway', 
      function() {
        return {
          require: '?ngModel',
          link: function(scope, elem, attrs, ngModel) {
            elem.on('click', function() {
              var counter = ngModel.$viewValue ? ngModel.$viewValue : 0
              ngModel.$setViewValue(++counter);
              scope.$apply();
            });
          }
        };
      }
    );

On your view

<button twoway ng-model="counter">Click Me</button>
<p>Click Count: {{ counter }}</p>

The fourth parameter is an API for the ngModelController, which has many uses for handling (parsing and formatting, for instance) and sharing data between a directive and a scope.

Here's the updated Plunker.

2
  • I was hoping to model the directive syntax after something like ngshow/nghide that takes the model property directly in its attribute value. I appreciate the implementation using ngModel though -- its something I haven't explored to deeply yet. Sep 18, 2013 at 22:08
  • 1
    Then go for isolate scope, see Doug's answer. Sep 18, 2013 at 22:17
2

You can definitely simplify it a bit like this without using $parse

angular.module('directive-binding', []).directive('twoway', [function () {
    return {
        scope: false,
        link: function (scope, elem, attrs) {
            elem.on('click', function () {
                scope[attrs.twoway] = scope[attrs.twoway] == null ? 1 : scope[attrs.twoway] + 1;
                scope.$apply();
            });
        }
    };
}]);
4
  • 1
    This doesn't seem to work if you use a "nested" object in your model. For example, if I used "counter.val" instead of "counter", this doesn't seem to work. Here's a Plunker -- my JS skills are not the best, so I may have missed something though. Sep 18, 2013 at 22:03
  • @DavidFaivre You need to initialize it in the controller like $scope.counter={}; $scope.counter.val = 0
    – zs2020
    Sep 18, 2013 at 22:23
  • if you're interested, see this on accessing "nested" objects by string. That's the underlying issue with this solution -- that you'd have to write some sort of parser. The $parser service, or the nested scope mapping, handles that for us in the Angular world. Sep 19, 2013 at 12:08
  • @DavidFaivre You didn't mention you want to use nested object in your original question. When you ask question, make sure you ask something clear.
    – zs2020
    Sep 19, 2013 at 14:02
2

A great way to apply two way binding is to use directive components. Here is my solution. It allows use of ng-repeat and expandable data binding.

View Plunker

HTML

<body ng-controller='MainCtrl'>  
    Data: {{data}}
    <hr>
    <mydirective name='data[0]'></mydirective>
    <hr>
    <mydirective name='data[1]'></mydirective>
</body>

Controller

app.controller('MainCtrl', function($scope) {
  $scope.data = [];
  $scope.data[0] = 'Marco';
  $scope.data[1] = 'Billy';
});

Directive

app.directive("mydirective", function(){
    return {
        restrict: "EA",
        scope: {name: '='},
        template: "<div>Your name is : {{name}}</div>"+
        "Change your name : <input type='text' ng-model='name' />"
    };
});

In the case of the counter, it can be done using the same method.

4
  • how can i access data[1] in my directive controller to make HTTP get call
    – bhaRATh
    Mar 28, 2019 at 8:01
  • You can add {controller : myDirectivecontroller} to your directive as part of the return object, and have it manipulate your data in the directive controller. I suggest keeping all RESTful requests in a Service, and have the Service referenced in the controller, like this: function myDirectivecontroller(ServiceName) { var ctrl = this; ... } Mar 29, 2019 at 12:39
  • @n.bharath I wrote this out with the use of components: plnkr.co/edit/4wOdA3OYkxS9vXAWfSxZ?p=preview Mar 29, 2019 at 13:27
  • From <my-component name='data.names[0]'></my-component> access name in controller based on name value then do http get call and bind response to template ** "<div>Your name is : {{$ctrl.response }}</div>"**
    – bhaRATh
    Apr 2, 2019 at 6:51
0

Change template to:

<button twoway bind="counter">Click Me</button>
<p>Click Count: {{ counter.val }}</p>

and directive to:

.directive('twoway',
    function() {
        return {
            scope: {
                localValue: '=?bind'
            },
            link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {
                scope.localValue = {
                    val: 0
                };
                elem.on('click', function() {
                    scope.localValue.val = scope.localValue.val + 1;
                    scope.$apply();
                });
            }
        };
    }
);
2
  • 1
    Can you explain how this is an answer to the question? Jan 16, 2017 at 20:44
  • 1
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. Jan 16, 2017 at 20:58

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