0

Consider following scheme:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `test` (
  `user_id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `username` varchar(20) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`user_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=5 ;

--
-- Dumping data for table `test`
--

INSERT INTO `test` (`user_id`, `username`) VALUES
(1, 'Jason'),
(2, 'OOO'),
(3, 'Stack'),
(4, 'Overflow');

And this query:

SELECT * FROM TEST WHERE username = 0

It Shows:

| USER_ID | USERNAME |
----------|----------|--
|       1 |    Jason |
|       2 |      OOO |
|       3 |    Stack |
|       4 | Overflow |

But not when username = '0' or when username = 1

Here is SQLFIDDLE DEMO

1
  • your query doesn't make sense... do your really expect an explanation? how would that help you? Sep 18, 2013 at 22:15

1 Answer 1

5

Since the username is String and you have compared it to a Number, MySQL silently cast the column name into number. See Here.

When the string is cast into a number and it starts with a letter, the value will be zero, that's why all the records are shown.

The adding a username of 5, like this demo, you'll see all the records except with this username since 5 <> 0.

1
  • yes exactly, I thought that mysql never casts the column if not mentioned, any way, bad behavior of mysql because data type is varchar.
    – Jason OOO
    Sep 18, 2013 at 22:19

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