0

I have a WCF service, called by a service client. I'd like to use the async / await constructs to wrap the call to this; however, the service and service client are .NET3.5. My solution to this is as follows:

private async Task<ObservableCollection<MyEntity>> LoadData(ParamData param)
{
        ServiceClient svc = new ServiceClient();
        int results = 0;

        // Set-up parameters
        myParams = BuildParams(param);

        // Call a count function to see how much data we're talking about
        // This call should be relatively quick
        var counter = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            results = svc.GetResultCount(myParams);
        }).ContinueWith((task) =>
        {
            if (results <= 10000 ||
                (MessageBox.Show("More than 10000 results, still retrieve data?"), MessageBoxButton.YesNo) == MessageBoxResult .Yes))
            {
                return svc.Search(myParams);
            }
        });
}

I get the compile error:

Since 'System.Action<System.Threading.Tasks.Task>' returns void, a return keyword must not be followed by an object expression

So, my question is, is it possible to run a synchronous method in this fashion and, if so, what am I doing wrong? My objective is that the method can be called like so:

var data = await LoadData(params);
6

When you add the Service Reference there is an option to generate async versions of the operations.

This is the (older) APM pattern (IAsyncResult, BeginMethod, EndMethod). You can hook this into async/wait with FromAsync :

 var task = Task.Factory.FromAsync(BeginGetResultCount, EndGetResultCount, myParams);

When you have many calls this is better, it doesn't waste so many threads to wait for I/O.

1

In your question, you first state that your client is on .NET 3.5, but then you proceed with an async method and tagged your question .NET 4.5. So I'm assuming that you are actually running on .NET 4.5.

In that case, you can just tell svcutil to create task-based asynchronous APIs (in VS2012, it should do this by default), and then call them like this:

private async Task<ObservableCollection<MyEntity>> LoadData(ParamData param)
{
    ServiceClient svc = new ServiceClient();

    // Set-up parameters
    myParams = BuildParams(param);

    // Call a count function to see how much data we're talking about
    // This call should be relatively quick
    var results = await svc.GetResultCountAsync(myParams);
    if (results <= 10000 ||
        (MessageBox.Show("More than 10000 results, still retrieve data?"), MessageBoxButton.YesNo) == MessageBoxResult .Yes))
        return await svc.Search(myParams);
}

If you are actually on .NET 4.0, then Henk has the correct answer. In that case, you may find my async WCF blog post helpful.

  • To clear u the versioning: the project that I'm currently writing is 4.5, but the service client being called is 3.5. – Paul Michaels Sep 19 '13 at 13:11
  • 2
    OK, in that case you should be able to (re-)create your ServiceClient proxy and VS2012 will generate Task-based APIs automatically. – Stephen Cleary Sep 19 '13 at 13:16
0

Okay - I've solved this. The return statement returns from the task, not the function; which is why it was complaining.

The correct code looks like this:

private async Task<ObservableCollection<MyEntity>> LoadData(ParamData param)
{
    ServiceClient svc = new ServiceClient();
    int results = 0;

    // Set-up parameters
    myParams = BuildParams(param);

    // Call a count function to see how much data we're talking about
    // This call should be relatively quick
    var counter = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        results = svc.GetResultCount(myParams);
    });

    var returnTask = counter.ContinueWith((task) =>
    {
        if (results <= 10000 ||
            (MessageBox.Show("More than 10000 results, still retrieve data?"), MessageBoxButton.YesNo) == MessageBoxResult .Yes))
        {
            return svc.Search(myParams);
        }
    });

    return returnTask.Result;
}
  • 1
    This code compiles but is not the most elegant way to do it. Moreover, you should realize that this is not asynchronous. All you are doing is to offload the svc.GetResultCount call to the thread pool. It will still chew up a thread and block till the call returns. Follow Henk's suggestion and then you can get truly async operation. I personally think one should avoid ContinueWith if you can use await as the code then is more readable. var results = await Task.Run(() => svc.GetResultCount(myParams)); if (results <= 1000 ...) return await Task.Run(() => svc.Search(myParams)); – Anupam Sep 20 '13 at 7:20
  • I stand corrected – Paul Michaels Sep 23 '13 at 11:03

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