59

We always came across many situation on daily basis wherein we have to do tedious and very many string operations in our code. We all know that string manipulations are expensive operations. I would like to know which is the least expensive among the available versions.

The most common operations is concatenation(This is something that we can control to some extent). What is the best way to concatenate std::strings in C++ and various workarounds to speed up concatenation?

I mean,

std::string l_czTempStr;

1).l_czTempStr = "Test data1" + "Test data2" + "Test data3";

2). l_czTempStr =  "Test data1"; 
    l_czTempStr += "Test data2";
    l_czTempStr += "Test data3";

3). using << operator

4). using append()

Also, do we get any advantage of using CString over std::string?

  • 6
    Why can't you measure? Anyway, stringstream is built for this use case, string is not. So it is probably a good bet to start out with stringstream. – Magnus Hoff Sep 19 '13 at 10:34
  • 2
    1. is not legal, ITYM l_czTempStr = std::string("Test data1") + "Test data2" + "Test data3";. Other than that the answer is to time the different techniques. There are so many variables that it's is impossible to answer the question. The answer depends on the number and length of strings you are working with, plus the platform you are compiling on, and the platform you are compiling for. – john Sep 19 '13 at 10:35
  • 7
    is it actually a bottleneck? Then benchmark it. In general, the fastest method is to pre-allocate enough space for all the data before appending any of it, and avoid using temporaries (+ creates a new object, with some special cases in C++11). But don't optimise this unless you need to or your code will be unreadable. – Dave Sep 19 '13 at 10:36
  • 6
    @MagnusHoff You've got it backwards. std::ostringstream is designed for formatting, and should normally only be used when you need formatting. All of his data are strings, so std::string and concatenation are the preferred solution. – James Kanze Sep 19 '13 at 10:42
  • 2
    As a side note: For very long strings, using a Rope instead of a string might be a good idea. – ComicSansMS Sep 19 '13 at 10:49
61

Here is a small test suite:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <chrono>
#include <sstream>

int main ()
{
    typedef std::chrono::high_resolution_clock clock;
    typedef std::chrono::duration<float, std::milli> mil;
    std::string l_czTempStr;
    std::string s1="Test data1";
    auto t0 = clock::now();
    #if VER==1
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
    {
        l_czTempStr = s1 + "Test data2" + "Test data3";
    }
    #elif VER==2
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
    {
        l_czTempStr =  "Test data1"; 
        l_czTempStr += "Test data2";
        l_czTempStr += "Test data3";
    }
    #elif VER==3
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
    {
        l_czTempStr =  "Test data1"; 
        l_czTempStr.append("Test data2");
        l_czTempStr.append("Test data3");
    }
    #elif VER==4
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
    {
        std::ostringstream oss;
        oss << "Test data1";
        oss << "Test data2";
        oss << "Test data3";
        l_czTempStr = oss.str();
    }
    #endif
    auto t1 = clock::now();
    std::cout << l_czTempStr << '\n';
    std::cout << mil(t1-t0).count() << "ms\n";
}

On coliru:

Compile with the following:

clang++ -std=c++11 -O3 -DVER=1 -Wall -pedantic -pthread main.cpp

21.6463ms

-DVER=2

6.61773ms

-DVER=3

6.7855ms

-DVER=4

102.015ms

It looks like 2), += is the winner.

(Also compiling with and without -pthread seems to affect the timings)

  • 1
    Nice! You numbering has 3) and 4) swapped wrt the question. Given the not too big differences it looks like the only firm conclusion is to avoid streams. This of course not only depends on the compiler (revision), but also on the stdlib implementation (I think one of GCC's on coliru). – Benjamin Bannier Sep 19 '13 at 11:12
  • 26
    The test may not be representative, unfortunately. The issue is that by not including l_czTempStr declaration within the loop, versions 2 and 3 reuse the same buffer over and over, whilst version 1 creates a new buffer std::string{""} each time. Your benchmark demonstrated that reusing the same buffer instead of allocating/deallocating provided a 5x speed-up (the speed-up was obvious, the factor depends on how long the pieces are and how many re-allocations occur if you do not reserve everything up-front). I am unsure whether the OP meant to be re-using the same buffer or not, though. – Matthieu M. Sep 19 '13 at 13:13
  • 2
    @MatthieuM.: +1 good point. I updated the code so the initial string is created beforehand in version 1, however operator+ still suffers from a lot of allocating/deallocating internally. – Jesse Good Sep 19 '13 at 21:51
  • 3
    Your stringstream benchmark includes the (incredibly) slow timing of the construction of the stream. – Rapptz Feb 16 '14 at 3:01
  • 2
    "It looks like 2), += is the winner." I'm not sure your results show any statistical difference from .append(). And nor should they: one of these is implemented in terms of the other. I don't see why they would be significantly different. – underscore_d Jun 25 '17 at 8:31
31

In addition to other answers...

I made extensive benchmarks about this problem some time ago, and came to the conclusion that the most efficient solution (GCC 4.7 & 4.8 on Linux x86 / x64 / ARM) in all use cases is first to reserve() the result string with enough space to hold all the concatenated strings, and then only append() them (or use operator +=(), that makes no difference).

Unfortunately it seems I deleted that benchmark so you only have my word (but you can easily adapt Mats Petersson's benchmark to verify this by yourself, if my word isn't enough).

In a nutshell:

const string space = " ";
string result;
result.reserve(5 + space.size() + 5);
result += "hello";
result += space;
result += "world";

Depending on the exact use case (number, types and sizes of the concatenated strings), sometimes this method is by far the most efficient, and other times it is on par with other methods, but it is never worse.


Problem is, this is really painful to compute the total required size in advance, especially when mixing string literals and std::string (the example above is clear enough on that matter, I believe). The maintainability of such code is absolutely horrible as soon as you modify one of the literals or add another string to be concatenated.

One approach would be to use sizeof to compute the size of the literals, but IMHO it creates as much mess than it solves, the maintainability is still terrible:

#define STR_HELLO "hello"
#define STR_WORLD "world"

const string space = " ";
string result;
result.reserve(sizeof(STR_HELLO)-1 + space.size() + sizeof(STR_WORLD)-1);
result += STR_HELLO;
result += space;
result += STR_WORLD;

A usable solution (C++11, variadic templates)

I finally settled for a set of variadic templates that efficiently take care of calculating the string sizes (eg. the size of string literals is determined at compile time), reserve() as needed, and then concatenate everything.

Here it is, hope this is useful:

namespace detail {

  template<typename>
  struct string_size_impl;

  template<size_t N>
  struct string_size_impl<const char[N]> {
    static constexpr size_t size(const char (&) [N]) { return N - 1; }
  };

  template<size_t N>
  struct string_size_impl<char[N]> {
    static size_t size(char (&s) [N]) { return N ? strlen(s) : 0; }
  };

  template<>
  struct string_size_impl<const char*> {
    static size_t size(const char* s) { return s ? strlen(s) : 0; }
  };

  template<>
  struct string_size_impl<char*> {
    static size_t size(char* s) { return s ? strlen(s) : 0; }
  };

  template<>
  struct string_size_impl<std::string> {
    static size_t size(const std::string& s) { return s.size(); }
  };

  template<typename String> size_t string_size(String&& s) {
    using noref_t = typename std::remove_reference<String>::type;
    using string_t = typename std::conditional<std::is_array<noref_t>::value,
                                              noref_t,
                                              typename std::remove_cv<noref_t>::type
                                              >::type;
    return string_size_impl<string_t>::size(s);
  }

  template<typename...>
  struct concatenate_impl;

  template<typename String>
  struct concatenate_impl<String> {
    static size_t size(String&& s) { return string_size(s); }
    static void concatenate(std::string& result, String&& s) { result += s; }
  };

  template<typename String, typename... Rest>
  struct concatenate_impl<String, Rest...> {
    static size_t size(String&& s, Rest&&... rest) {
      return string_size(s)
           + concatenate_impl<Rest...>::size(std::forward<Rest>(rest)...);
    }
    static void concatenate(std::string& result, String&& s, Rest&&... rest) {
      result += s;
      concatenate_impl<Rest...>::concatenate(result, std::forward<Rest>(rest)...);
    }
  };

} // namespace detail

template<typename... Strings>
std::string concatenate(Strings&&... strings) {
  std::string result;
  result.reserve(detail::concatenate_impl<Strings...>::size(std::forward<Strings>(strings)...));
  detail::concatenate_impl<Strings...>::concatenate(result, std::forward<Strings>(strings)...);
  return result;
}

The only interesting part, as far as the public interface is concerned, is the very last template<typename... Strings> std::string concatenate(Strings&&... strings) template. Usage is straightforward:

int main() {
  const string space = " ";
  std::string result = concatenate("hello", space, "world");
  std::cout << result << std::endl;
}

With optimizations turned on, any decent compiler should be able to expand the concatenate call to the same code as my first example where I manually wrote everything. As far as GCC 4.7 & 4.8 are concerned, the generated code is pretty much identical as well as the performance.

  • I don't understand the reason for using universal references here. Could you explain what advantage they could provide over normal (lvalue) references to const? – Paul Groke Sep 22 '15 at 2:39
  • Have you done a wstring implementation of this? It looks like it would be straightforward. – KarlM Jul 12 '17 at 23:57
  • with or without "reserve" function shows no diff in my test , sometimes "reserve" function worse. – Hao Nov 16 '17 at 3:05
18

The WORST possible scenario is using plain old strcat (or sprintf), since strcat takes a C string, and that has to be "counted" to find the end. For long strings, that's a real performance sufferer. C++ style strings are much better, and the performance problems are likely to be with the memory allocation, rather than counting lengths. But then again, the string grows geometrically (doubles each time it needs to grow), so it's not that terrible.

I'd very much suspect that all of the above methods end up with the same, or at least very similar, performance. If anything, I'd expect that stringstream is slower, because of the overhead in supporting formatting - but I also suspect it's marginal.

As this sort of thing is "fun", I will get back with a benchmark...

Edit:

Note that these result apply to MY machine, running x86-64 Linux, compiled with g++ 4.6.3. Other OS's, compilers and C++ runtime library implementations may vary. If performance is important to your application, then benchmark on the system(s) that are critical for you, using the compiler(s) that you use.

Here's the code I wrote to test this. It may not be the perfect representation of a real scenario, but I think it's a representative scenario:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

static __inline__ unsigned long long rdtsc(void)
{
    unsigned hi, lo;
    __asm__ __volatile__ ("rdtsc" : "=a"(lo), "=d"(hi));
    return ( (unsigned long long)lo)|( ((unsigned long long)hi)<<32 );
}

string build_string_1(const string &a, const string &b, const string &c)
{
    string out = a + b + c;
    return out;
}

string build_string_1a(const string &a, const string &b, const string &c)
{
    string out;
    out.resize(a.length()*3);
    out = a + b + c;
    return out;
}

string build_string_2(const string &a, const string &b, const string &c)
{
    string out = a;
    out += b;
    out += c;
    return out;
}

string build_string_3(const string &a, const string &b, const string &c)
{
    string out;
    out = a;
    out.append(b);
    out.append(c);
    return out;
}


string build_string_4(const string &a, const string &b, const string &c)
{
    stringstream ss;

    ss << a << b << c;
    return ss.str();
}


char *build_string_5(const char *a, const char *b, const char *c)
{
    char* out = new char[strlen(a) * 3+1];
    strcpy(out, a);
    strcat(out, b);
    strcat(out, c);
    return out;
}



template<typename T>
size_t len(T s)
{
    return s.length();
}

template<>
size_t len(char *s)
{
    return strlen(s);
}

template<>
size_t len(const char *s)
{
    return strlen(s);
}



void result(const char *name, unsigned long long t, const string& out)
{
    cout << left << setw(22) << name << " time:" << right << setw(10) <<  t;
    cout << "   (per character: " 
         << fixed << right << setw(8) << setprecision(2) << (double)t / len(out) << ")" << endl;
}

template<typename T>
void benchmark(const char name[], T (Func)(const T& a, const T& b, const T& c), const char *strings[])
{
    unsigned long long t;

    const T s1 = strings[0];
    const T s2 = strings[1];
    const T s3 = strings[2];
    t = rdtsc();
    T out = Func(s1, s2, s3);
    t = rdtsc() - t; 

    if (len(out) != len(s1) + len(s2) + len(s3))
    {
        cout << "Error: out is different length from inputs" << endl;
        cout << "Got `" << out << "` from `" << s1 << "` + `" << s2 << "` + `" << s3 << "`";
    }
    result(name, t, out);
}


void benchmark(const char name[], char* (Func)(const char* a, const char* b, const char* c), 
               const char *strings[])
{
    unsigned long long t;

    const char* s1 = strings[0];
    const char* s2 = strings[1];
    const char* s3 = strings[2];
    t = rdtsc();
    char *out = Func(s1, s2, s3);
    t = rdtsc() - t; 

    if (len(out) != len(s1) + len(s2) + len(s3))
    {
        cout << "Error: out is different length from inputs" << endl;
        cout << "Got `" << out << "` from `" << s1 << "` + `" << s2 << "` + `" << s3 << "`";
    }
    result(name, t, out);
    delete [] out;
}


#define BM(func, size) benchmark(#func " " #size, func, strings ## _ ## size)


#define BM_LOT(size) BM(build_string_1, size); \
    BM(build_string_1a, size); \
    BM(build_string_2, size); \
    BM(build_string_3, size); \
    BM(build_string_4, size); \
    BM(build_string_5, size);

int main()
{
    const char *strings_small[]  = { "Abc", "Def", "Ghi" };
    const char *strings_medium[] = { "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz", 
                                     "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc", 
                                     "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef" };
    const char *strings_large[]   = 
        { "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
          "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz", 

          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc" 
          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc" 
          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc" 
          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc" 
          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc"

          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc" 
          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc" 
          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc" 
          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc" 
          "defghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabc", 

          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
          "ghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdef"
        };

    for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        BM_LOT(small);
        BM_LOT(medium);
        BM_LOT(large);
        cout << "---------------------------------------------" << endl;
    }
}

Here are some representative results:

build_string_1 small   time:      4075   (per character:   452.78)
build_string_1a small  time:      5384   (per character:   598.22)
build_string_2 small   time:      2669   (per character:   296.56)
build_string_3 small   time:      2427   (per character:   269.67)
build_string_4 small   time:     19380   (per character:  2153.33)
build_string_5 small   time:      6299   (per character:   699.89)
build_string_1 medium  time:      3983   (per character:    51.06)
build_string_1a medium time:      6970   (per character:    89.36)
build_string_2 medium  time:      4072   (per character:    52.21)
build_string_3 medium  time:      4000   (per character:    51.28)
build_string_4 medium  time:     19614   (per character:   251.46)
build_string_5 medium  time:      6304   (per character:    80.82)
build_string_1 large   time:      8491   (per character:     3.63)
build_string_1a large  time:      9563   (per character:     4.09)
build_string_2 large   time:      6154   (per character:     2.63)
build_string_3 large   time:      5992   (per character:     2.56)
build_string_4 large   time:     32450   (per character:    13.87)
build_string_5 large   time:     15768   (per character:     6.74)

Same code, run as 32-bit:

build_string_1 small   time:      4289   (per character:   476.56)
build_string_1a small  time:      5967   (per character:   663.00)
build_string_2 small   time:      3329   (per character:   369.89)
build_string_3 small   time:      3047   (per character:   338.56)
build_string_4 small   time:     22018   (per character:  2446.44)
build_string_5 small   time:      3026   (per character:   336.22)
build_string_1 medium  time:      4089   (per character:    52.42)
build_string_1a medium time:      8075   (per character:   103.53)
build_string_2 medium  time:      4569   (per character:    58.58)
build_string_3 medium  time:      4326   (per character:    55.46)
build_string_4 medium  time:     22751   (per character:   291.68)
build_string_5 medium  time:      2252   (per character:    28.87)
build_string_1 large   time:      8695   (per character:     3.72)
build_string_1a large  time:     12818   (per character:     5.48)
build_string_2 large   time:      8202   (per character:     3.51)
build_string_3 large   time:      8351   (per character:     3.57)
build_string_4 large   time:     38250   (per character:    16.35)
build_string_5 large   time:      8143   (per character:     3.48)

From this, we can conclude:

  1. The best option is appending a bit at a time (out.append() or out +=), with the "chained" approach reasonably close.

  2. Pre-allocating the string is not helpful.

  3. Using stringstream is pretty poor idea (between 2-4x slower).

  4. The char * uses new char[]. Using a local variable in the calling function makes it the fastest - but slightly unfairly to compare that.

  5. There is a fair bit of overhead in combining short string - just copying data should be at most one cycle per byte [unless the data doesn't fit in the cache].

edit2

Added, as per comments:

string build_string_1b(const string &a, const string &b, const string &c)
{
    return a + b + c;
}

and

string build_string_2a(const string &a, const string &b, const string &c)
{
    string out;
    out.reserve(a.length() * 3);
    out += a;
    out += b;
    out += c;
    return out;
}

Which gives these results:

build_string_1 small   time:      3845   (per character:   427.22)
build_string_1b small  time:      3165   (per character:   351.67)
build_string_2 small   time:      3176   (per character:   352.89)
build_string_2a small  time:      1904   (per character:   211.56)

build_string_1 large   time:      9056   (per character:     3.87)
build_string_1b large  time:      6414   (per character:     2.74)
build_string_2 large   time:      6417   (per character:     2.74)
build_string_2a large  time:      4179   (per character:     1.79)

(A 32-bit run, but the 64-bit shows very similar results on these).

  • 1
    Nice benchmark, +1. Concerning 1a (pre-allocating the string) in reality you are throwing away the pre-allocated buffer: the result of operator +() is a temporary that is moved (or RVO'd) into out so the pre-allocation is useless. An interesting benchmark would be to create 2a / 3a cases where you reserve() the result string ahead, and then append() or += all the parameters to your result string. As I explain in my answer, I did such benchmarks some time ago and came to the conclusion that this is indeed the most efficient solution. – syam Sep 19 '13 at 15:40
  • I took your code and added a build_string_1b function that just did return a + b + c; which turned out to be the fastest function in some runs (VS2012). – Blastfurnace Sep 19 '13 at 15:46
  • Just nitpicking concerning 2a: currently you have two memory allocations (copy a then reserve), this could be further improved by using reserve on an empty string, and only then += all your parameters (which gives you a single memory allocation, the reserve). I'd edit that myself but the timings are for your machine so I'll let you do it. ;) – syam Sep 19 '13 at 15:59
  • @Syam: I did actually write that eventually, but I must have copied the code wront - results are for the code I've posted now. – Mats Petersson Sep 19 '13 at 16:04
8

As with most micro-optimisations, you will need to measure the effect of each option, having first established through measurement that this is indeed a bottle-neck worth optimising. There is no definitive answer.

append and += should do exactly the same thing.

+ is conceptually less efficient, since you're creating and destroying temporaries. Your compiler may or may not be able to optimise this to be as fast as appending.

Calling reserve with the total size may reduce the number of memory allocations needed - they will probably be the biggest bottleneck.

<< (presumably on a stringstream) may or may not be faster; you'll need to measure that. It's useful if you need to format non-string types, but probably won't be particularly better or worse at dealing with strings.

CString has the disadvantage that it's not portable, and that a Unix hacker like me can't tell you what its advantages may or may not be.

1

I decided to run a test with the code provided by user Jesse Good, slightly modified to take into account the observation of Rapptz, specifically the fact that the ostringstream was constructed in each single iteration of the loop. Therefore I added some cases, a couple of them being the ostringstream cleared with the sequence "oss.str(""); oss.clear()"

Here is the code

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <chrono>
#include <sstream>
#include <functional>


template <typename F> void time_measurement(F f, const std::string& comment)
{
    typedef std::chrono::high_resolution_clock clock;
    typedef std::chrono::duration<float, std::milli> mil;
    std::string r;
    auto t0 = clock::now();
    f(r);
    auto t1 = clock::now();
    std::cout << "\n-------------------------" << comment << "-------------------\n" <<r << '\n';
    std::cout << mil(t1-t0).count() << "ms\n";
    std::cout << "---------------------------------------------------------------------------\n";

}

inline void clear(std::ostringstream& x)
{
    x.str("");
    x.clear();
}

void test()
{
    std:: cout << std::endl << "----------------String Comparison---------------- " << std::endl;
    const int n=100000;
    {
        auto f=[](std::string& l_czTempStr)
        {
            std::string s1="Test data1";
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            {
                l_czTempStr = s1 + "Test data2" + "Test data3";
            }
        };
        time_measurement(f, "string, plain addition");
   }

   {
        auto f=[](std::string& l_czTempStr)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            {
                l_czTempStr =  "Test data1";
                l_czTempStr += "Test data2";
                l_czTempStr += "Test data3";
            }
        };
        time_measurement(f, "string, incremental");
    }

    {
         auto f=[](std::string& l_czTempStr)
         {
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            {
                l_czTempStr =  "Test data1";
                l_czTempStr.append("Test data2");
                l_czTempStr.append("Test data3");
            }
         };
         time_measurement(f, "string, append");
     }

    {
         auto f=[](std::string& l_czTempStr)
         {
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            {
                std::ostringstream oss;
                oss << "Test data1";
                oss << "Test data2";
                oss << "Test data3";
                l_czTempStr = oss.str();
            }
         };
         time_measurement(f, "oss, creation in each loop, incremental");
     }

    {
         auto f=[](std::string& l_czTempStr)
         {
            std::ostringstream oss;
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            {
                oss.str("");
                oss.clear();
                oss << "Test data1";
                oss << "Test data2";
                oss << "Test data3";
            }
            l_czTempStr = oss.str();
         };
         time_measurement(f, "oss, 1 creation, incremental");
     }

    {
         auto f=[](std::string& l_czTempStr)
         {
            std::ostringstream oss;
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            {
                oss.str("");
                oss.clear();
                oss << "Test data1" << "Test data2" << "Test data3";
            }
            l_czTempStr = oss.str();
         };
         time_measurement(f, "oss, 1 creation, plain addition");
     }

    {
         auto f=[](std::string& l_czTempStr)
         {
            std::ostringstream oss;
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            {
                clear(oss);
                oss << "Test data1" << "Test data2" << "Test data3";
            }
            l_czTempStr = oss.str();
         };
         time_measurement(f, "oss, 1 creation, clearing calling inline function, plain addition");
     }


    {
         auto f=[](std::string& l_czTempStr)
         {
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            {
                std::string x;
                x =  "Test data1";
                x.append("Test data2");
                x.append("Test data3");
                l_czTempStr=x;
            }
         };
         time_measurement(f, "string, creation in each loop");
     }

}

Here are the results:

/*

g++ "qtcreator debug mode"
----------------String Comparison---------------- 

-------------------------string, plain addition-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
11.8496ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------string, incremental-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
3.55597ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------string, append-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
3.53099ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------oss, creation in each loop, incremental-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
58.1577ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------oss, 1 creation, incremental-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
11.1069ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------oss, 1 creation, plain addition-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
10.9946ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------oss, 1 creation, clearing calling inline function, plain addition-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
10.9502ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------string, creation in each loop-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
9.97495ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


g++ "qtcreator release mode" (optimized)
----------------String Comparison----------------

-------------------------string, plain addition-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
8.41622ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------string, incremental-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
2.55462ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------string, append-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
2.5154ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------oss, creation in each loop, incremental-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
54.3232ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------oss, 1 creation, incremental-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
8.71854ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------oss, 1 creation, plain addition-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
8.80526ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------oss, 1 creation, clearing calling inline function, plain addition-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
8.78186ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------string, creation in each loop-------------------
Test data1Test data2Test data3
8.4034ms
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
*/

Now using std::string is still faster, and the append is still the fastest way of concatenation, but ostringstream is no more so incredibly terrible like it was before.

0

There are some significant parameters, which has potential impact on deciding the "most optimized way". Some of these are - string/content size, number of operations, compiler optimization, etc.

In most of the cases, string::operator+= seems to be working best. However at times, on some compilers, it is also observed that ostringstream::operator<< works best [like - MingW g++ 3.2.3, 1.8 GHz single processor Dell PC]. When compiler context comes, then it is majorly the optimizations at compiler which would impact. Also to mention, that stringstreams are complex objects as compared to simple strings, and therefore adds to the overhead.

For more info - discussion, article.

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