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I have a page generated by WordPress which HTML looks similar to the HTML below. I would like to the first-letter of my div to have a different size, but when I try to add style for p:first-letter, all p's change sizes. My problem is I can't remove the p-tags because these are automatically created.

<div class="div">
    <p>Paragraph 1</p> <!-- I need "P" in "Paragraph" in different size -->
    <p>Paragraph 2</p>
    <blockquote><p>Text blockquote</p></blockquote>
</div>

Any suggestions?

http://jsfiddle.net/hdNDh/

5

Use the CSS child selector >.

E > F - Matches any F element that is a child of an element E.

jsFiddle

.div > p:first-letter {
    font-size:40px;
}

Edit: It seems I misunderstood your question at first, if you need the first letter of the div only, simply set the pseudo-class on the div instead of on the p.

jsFiddle

.div:first-letter {
    font-size:40px;
}

Edit2: As mentioned in the comments below, for this to work in FF you need:

.div > p:first-child:first-letter {
    font-size:40px;
}

jsFiddle

This seems strange/weird behaviour, so I have had a bit of a look around and it seems that Firefox is more particular about the :first-letter pseudo-class than other browsers. One example is that it doesn't count special characters to be letters, and therefore won't apply styles to them.

Results from testing a little bit just now: Firefox doesn't count the first letter of the first child element to be the same as the first letter encountered within itself including child elements (even when there is no preceding text), whereas Chrome does count the first letter of the first child element to be the same as the first letter encountered within itself including child elements (when there is no preceding text).

  • I see two big Ps. – isherwood Sep 19 '13 at 12:51
  • nice fliestra its help me as well – Atif Azad Sep 19 '13 at 12:51
  • @Isherwood - Ah, it seems I misunderstood :) will fix it. – Mathijs Flietstra Sep 19 '13 at 12:52
  • 1
    nice one.. just beware that if you use space before selector like this: .div :first-letter then that is applying to all child elements instead. – Mr_Green Sep 19 '13 at 12:58
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    @MathijsFlietstra: Your second example isn't working in FF 23 – Adrift Sep 19 '13 at 13:00
1

You need a combination of selectors:

http://jsfiddle.net/hdNDh/5/

.div > p:first-child:first-letter {
    font-size:40px;
}
1

You can use:

.div > p:first-child::first-letter {
    font-size: 24px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/hdNDh/2/

  • 1
    just asking.. why two colons for second selector? it is just you kept it or there is any meaning behind it :) – Mr_Green Sep 19 '13 at 13:08
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    @Mr_Green: Extracted from here. With the introduction of CSS3, in order to make a differentiation between pseudo-classes and pseudo-elements (yes, they’re different), in CSS3 all pseudo-elements must use the double-colon syntax, and all pseudo-classes must use the single-colon syntax – Harry Sep 19 '13 at 13:13

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