70

I have a data structure in the following format:

data_hash = [
    { price: 1, count: 3 },
    { price: 2, count: 3 },
    { price: 3, count: 3 }
  ]

Is there an efficient way to get the values of :price as an array like [1,2,3]?

6
  • 1
    The example you give is not valid ruby syntax. (Without a valid example we can't help you). Also, it would helpful if you show us what you've already tried.
    – tessi
    Sep 19, 2013 at 16:15
  • 1
    We need to see your attempt at solving this problem. Without your code it looks like you're just asking someone to write code for you, which is a great way to get your question closed. Otherwise, we can simply say, "Yes, there is an efficient way to get the values" and leave it to you to figure it out. Which would you prefer? Sep 19, 2013 at 16:22
  • Probably the question should swap { } and [ ] brackets (making it an array of hashes). I just tried for 5 mins to find an existing question (I am really convinced this is a duplicate), but I think SO has buried the answers under more complex examples. Sep 20, 2013 at 9:39
  • 8
    Use data_hash.pluck(:price) now, for the love of god
    – Rambatino
    Apr 24, 2017 at 19:01
  • 2
    @Rambatino pluck is a rails method. This is a general ruby question. Sep 25, 2020 at 19:14

2 Answers 2

126

First, if you are using ruby < 1.9:

array = [
    {:price => 1, :count => 3},
    {:price => 2, :count => 3},
    {:price => 3, :count => 3}
]

Then to get what you need:

array.map{|x| x[:price]}
2
  • 3
    The updated syntax for the "hash" is correct, but at that point data_hash is a misnomer. The OP should use data_hashes or data_array, either of which would be better. Sep 19, 2013 at 16:27
  • Oops, you are right. Corrected.
    – Zabba
    Sep 19, 2013 at 16:28
0

There is a closed question that redirects here asking about handing map a Symbol to derive a key. This can be done using an Enumerable as a middle-man:

array = [
    {:price => 1, :count => 3},
    {:price => 2, :count => 3},
    {:price => 3, :count => 3}
]

array.each.with_object(:price).map(&:[])

#=> [1, 2, 3] 

Beyond being slightly more verbose and more difficult to understand, it also slower.


Benchmark.bm do |b| 
  b.report { 10000.times { array.map{|x| x[:price] } } }
  b.report { 10000.times { array.each.with_object(:price).map(&:[]) } }
end

#       user     system      total        real
#   0.004816   0.000005   0.004821 (  0.004816)
#   0.015723   0.000606   0.016329 (  0.016334)

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