29

I would like to print a list in R without line numbers.

I tried the cat command but it doesn't work for lists.

Does anyone have any suggestions ?

    GROUP    SEX INCOME STATE    n  mean
11       1   Male      1    AL  159 26.49
12       2 Female      1    AL  204 26.64
13       3   Male      2    AL  255 27.97
14       4 Female      2    AL  476 29.06

Example data to use:

foo <- structure(list(GROUP = 1:4, 
                      SEX = structure(c(2L, 1L, 2L, 1L),
                                      .Label = c("Female", "Male"),
                                      class = "factor"),
                      INCOME = c(1L, 1L, 2L, 2L), 
                      STATE = structure(c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L), .Label = "AL", 
                                        class = "factor"), 
                      n = c(159L, 204L, 255L, 476L), 
                      mean = c(26.49, 26.64, 27.97, 29.06)),
                 .Names = c("GROUP", "SEX", "INCOME", "STATE", "n", "mean"), 
                 class = "data.frame", row.names = 11:14)

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  • Can you give an example of you code or what you are trying to display? – user2005253 Sep 19 '13 at 20:52
  • 1
    Whilst we are waiting, and to clarify matters, what you show is (or looks like) a data frame, not a list. Is it the 11, 12, 13, 14 that you don't want printing? Also, to help out the Stack Overflow crowd, could you include the output of dput(foo) in your question, after the example data?, where foo is the R object you pasted in? That will give something concrete to work with. – Gavin Simpson Sep 19 '13 at 21:16
  • @GavinSimpson For privacy with this particular data set I'd rather not print out the whole data set. Will use dput in the future though – Parag Sep 19 '13 at 21:24
  • @pmagunia I meant just for the snippet you showed. For example, if your object is foo and you want only the first 4 rows, then dput(foo[1:4, ]) would help. As it happens I did it for you by reading the four lines into R, changing the rownames, and dput() it. – Gavin Simpson Sep 19 '13 at 21:27
40

Do you just want the argument row.names = FALSE? E.g.

> print(foo, row.names = FALSE)
 GROUP    SEX INCOME STATE   n  mean
     1   Male      1    AL 159 26.49
     2 Female      1    AL 204 26.64
     3   Male      2    AL 255 27.97
     4 Female      2    AL 476 29.06

where this is using the ?print.data.frame method.

  • 4
    Good one, did not know about that option :) Much better than my solution – nico Sep 19 '13 at 21:23
  • This is alot easier than working with regular expressions ! Thank you – Parag Sep 19 '13 at 21:28
  • @pmagunia That said, I suspect writing the data frame to file/connection and then piping through awk, it would be very easy to remove the row names, depending on the context. The printed representation of the table may not be what is wanted in all contexts. But glad you found the Answer helpful in this case. – Gavin Simpson Sep 19 '13 at 21:50
  • @GavinSimpson, what do you do in case of list of lists like : C=list(listA = list(1:3, structure(1:9, .Dim = c(3L, 3L)), 4:9), listB = list(c("t1", "t2", "t3"), structure(c("p1", "p2"), .Dim = 2:1))), in this case print(C,row.names=FALSE) does not work ! – user9112767 Sep 29 '18 at 11:17
4

Something like this should work:

apply(l, 1, function(x){cat(x); cat("\n")})
  • Unfortunately, that loses the formatting/spacing. – Gavin Simpson Sep 19 '13 at 21:21
  • 2
    This apply(l, 1, function(x){cat(x, sep = '\t'); cat("\n")}) could work (prints .tsv formated table). – Kamil S Jaron Apr 16 '17 at 16:59

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