9

The new password_hash API in PHP 5.5 is nice and I'd like to start using it everywhere. Given an older project with an older database where passwords are stored in md5 hashes, what is the best way to go about migrating old user passwords to the new, more secure API?

Apart from simply prompting users to reset their password upon next login (this is impractical and annoying for users) I've thought about the possibility of using current md5 hash as the input to password_hash() for all my existing users. To verify passwords for these users (during login), I'd convert their input to an md5 hash and then use that to password_verify(). New users would be spared this extra step.

Is this a worthwhile way to go about this? Are there any better ways for transparent migration in which users are not nagged about password resets yet I can immediately enjoy the benefits of more secure hashing?

Most importantly, is there even a security benefit in taking existing md5 hashes (which are prone to brute force) and using the password_hash() API to "double-hash" it?

  • 2
    Normally you can just wait until the user logs in the next time, i wrote an answer to the same question here Moving old passwords to new hashing algorithm?. Because MD5 is very weak for hashing passwords, you could consider storing a BCrypt hash of your MD5 hash password_hash($existingMD5Hash), and migrate it to password_hash($password) on the next login. – martinstoeckli Sep 20 '13 at 6:54
  • Also see Openwall's PHP password hashing framework (PHPass). Its portable and hardened against a number of common attacks on user passwords. The guy who wrote the framework (SolarDesigner) is the same guy who wrote John The Ripper and sits as a judge in the Password Hashing Competition. So he knows a thing or two about attacks on passwords. – jww Oct 12 '14 at 1:01
11

In your login.php (?) you convert the old passwords from MD5 to bcrypt and replace the old MD5 hash in the database with the new one.

Pseudo code:

$password = $_POST["password"];

if (substr($pwInDatabase, 0, 1) == "$")
{
    // Password already converted, verify using password_verify
}
else
{
    // User still using the old MD5, update it!

    if (md5($password) == $pwInDatabase)
    {
        $db->storePw(password_hash($password));
    }
}

Double hashing would not increase the security of bcrypt, as bcrypt itsef is a one-way hashing function.

Nota: MD5 produces a 32 character length string, while password_hash() is a minimum of 60.

Read the manual:

If and when you do decide to use password_hash() or the compatibility pack (if PHP < 5.5) https://github.com/ircmaxell/password_compat/, it is important to note that if your present password column's length is anything lower than 60, it will need to be changed to that (or higher). The manual suggests a length of 255.

You will need to ALTER your column's length and start over with a new hash in order for it to take effect. Otherwise, MySQL will fail silently.

  • 1
    I'd just add to this that from what I've read since and what martinstoeckli commented above - double hashing is in fact useful for existing MD5 passwords since it improves the security of the otherwise weak MD5 hashes. So: password_hash($existingMD5Hash). Then when the user does log in, I can do what you explained here... – Aron Sep 21 '13 at 14:26
2

Since it is one way encryption, unless you want the users passwords on your login page, which is not secure, you can have the users reenter their passwords. The other option is to reencrypt all of the database records with password_hash() on top of their md5() hashed passwords and store those values to the database, then on your login PHP page put the password_hash() around your md5(), somewhat like:

password_hash(md5($_POST['password']));

Using the second way you don't have to have the user reset their passwords.

0

There is very specific use case that has not yet been mentioned here, and that is when you have taken a first step already and began to use crypt function, but still using MD5 algorithm.

In that case your password hashing at registration/password change would look like:

$pass_hash = crypt($pass, '$1$salthere');
// store $pass_hash in database

And then you would have comparison with:

if(hash_equals($pass_hash_from_db, crypt($user_input, '$1$salthere')))
{
  // user logged in
}

The beauty of this transition is that your database would already be in the state ready to use password_verify.

The registration/password change would become:

 $pass_hash = password_hash($pass);
 // store $pass_hash in database

And you would substitute comparison with:

if(password_verify($user_input, $pass_hash_from_db))
{
  // user logged in
}

This would just work out of the box, and upgrade all user's passwords at next password change. But we don't need to wait, and do what @Fabian did in one's answer here as well.

Here we need to only change the login:

if(password_verify($user_input, $pass_hash_from_db))
{
  // user logged in
  if(password_needs_rehash($pass_hash_from_db, PASSWORD_DEFAULT))
  {
    $pass_hash = password_hash($user_input);
    // store $pass_hash in database
  }
}

This would serve the added benefit of upgrading user's passwords as soon as the new password algorithm will become PHP's default one. You would actually have to do absolutely nothing.

If you wish to use additional parameters for your password hashing function (such as changing the "cost"), you should look at password_hash and password_needs_rehash documentation, pay attention to optional last parameter $options .

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