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Question

While writing a Matrix class for use with OpenGL libraries, I came across the question of whether to use Java arrays or a Buffer strategy to store the data (JOGL offers direct-buffer copy for Matrix operations). To analyze this, I wrote a small performance test program that compares the relative speeds of loop and bulk operations on Arrays vs Buffers vs direct Buffers.

I'd like to share my results with you here (as I find them rather interesting). Please feel free to comment and/or point out any mistakes.
The code can be viewed at pastebin.com/is7UaiMV.

Notes

  • Loop-read array is implemented as A[i] = B[i] as otherwise the JIT optimizer will completely remove that code. Actual var = A[i] seems to be pretty much the same.

  • In the sample result for array size of 10,000 it is very likely that the JIT optimizer has replaced the looped array access with a System.arraycopy like implementation.

  • There is no bulk-get buffer->buffer as Java implements A.get(B) as B.put(A), therefore the results would be the same as the bulk-put results.

Conclusion

Under almost all situations it is strongly recommended to use the Java internal Arrays. Not only is the put/get speed massively faster, the JIT is as well able to perform much better optimizations on the final code.

Buffers should only be used if both the following applies:

  • You need to process large amounts of data.
  • That data is mostly or always bulk-processed.

Note that a backened-buffer has a Java Array backening the content of the buffer. It is recommended to do operations on this back-buffer instead of looping put/get.

Direct buffers should only be used if you worry about memory usage and never access the underlying data. They are slightly slower than non-direct buffers, much slower if the underlying data is accessed, but use less memory. In addition there is an extra overhead when converting non-byte data (like float-arrays) into bytes when using a direct buffer.

For more details see here:

Sample results

Note: Percentage is only for ease of reading and has no real meaning.

Using arrays of size 16 with 10,000,000 iterations...

-- Array tests: -----------------------------------------

Loop-write array:           87.29 ms  11,52%
Arrays.fill:                64.51 ms   8,51%
Loop-read array:            42.11 ms   5,56%
System.arraycopy:           47.25 ms   6,23%

-- Buffer tests: ----------------------------------------

Loop-put buffer:           603.71 ms  79,65%
Index-put buffer:          536.05 ms  70,72%
Bulk-put array->buffer:    105.43 ms  13,91%
Bulk-put buffer->buffer:    99.09 ms  13,07%

Bulk-put bufferD->buffer:   80.38 ms  10,60%
Loop-get buffer:           505.77 ms  66,73%
Index-get buffer:          562.84 ms  74,26%
Bulk-get buffer->array:    137.86 ms  18,19%

-- Direct buffer tests: ---------------------------------

Loop-put bufferD:          570.69 ms  75,29%
Index-put bufferD:         562.76 ms  74,25%
Bulk-put array->bufferD:   712.16 ms  93,96%
Bulk-put buffer->bufferD:   83.53 ms  11,02%

Bulk-put bufferD->bufferD: 118.00 ms  15,57%
Loop-get bufferD:          528.62 ms  69,74%
Index-get bufferD:         560.36 ms  73,93%
Bulk-get bufferD->array:   757.95 ms 100,00%

Using arrays of size 1,000 with 100,000 iterations...

-- Array tests: -----------------------------------------

Loop-write array:           22.10 ms   6,21%
Arrays.fill:                10.37 ms   2,91%
Loop-read array:            81.12 ms  22,79%
System.arraycopy:           10.59 ms   2,97%

-- Buffer tests: ----------------------------------------

Loop-put buffer:           355.98 ms 100,00%
Index-put buffer:          353.80 ms  99,39%
Bulk-put array->buffer:     16.33 ms   4,59%
Bulk-put buffer->buffer:     5.40 ms   1,52%

Bulk-put bufferD->buffer:    4.95 ms   1,39%
Loop-get buffer:           299.95 ms  84,26%
Index-get buffer:          343.05 ms  96,37%
Bulk-get buffer->array:     15.94 ms   4,48%

-- Direct buffer tests: ---------------------------------

Loop-put bufferD:          355.11 ms  99,75%
Index-put bufferD:         348.63 ms  97,93%
Bulk-put array->bufferD:   190.86 ms  53,61%
Bulk-put buffer->bufferD:    5.60 ms   1,57%

Bulk-put bufferD->bufferD:   7.73 ms   2,17%
Loop-get bufferD:          344.10 ms  96,66%
Index-get bufferD:         333.03 ms  93,55%
Bulk-get bufferD->array:   190.12 ms  53,41%

Using arrays of size 10,000 with 100,000 iterations...

-- Array tests: -----------------------------------------

Loop-write array:          156.02 ms   4,37%
Arrays.fill:               109.06 ms   3,06%
Loop-read array:           300.45 ms   8,42%
System.arraycopy:          147.36 ms   4,13%

-- Buffer tests: ----------------------------------------

Loop-put buffer:          3385.94 ms  94,89%
Index-put buffer:         3568.43 ms 100,00%
Bulk-put array->buffer:    159.40 ms   4,47%
Bulk-put buffer->buffer:     5.31 ms   0,15%

Bulk-put bufferD->buffer:    6.61 ms   0,19%
Loop-get buffer:          2907.21 ms  81,47%
Index-get buffer:         3413.56 ms  95,66%
Bulk-get buffer->array:    177.31 ms   4,97%

-- Direct buffer tests: ---------------------------------

Loop-put bufferD:         3319.25 ms  93,02%
Index-put bufferD:        3538.16 ms  99,15%
Bulk-put array->bufferD:  1849.45 ms  51,83%
Bulk-put buffer->bufferD:    5.60 ms   0,16%

Bulk-put bufferD->bufferD:   7.63 ms   0,21%
Loop-get bufferD:         3227.26 ms  90,44%
Index-get bufferD:        3413.94 ms  95,67%
Bulk-get bufferD->array:  1848.24 ms  51,79%
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  • 3
    Those numbers make the API look horrible. Did you set it as a Direct type buffer to do the tests? That enables better JIT optimizations, shortcuts all the backing arrays, etc. Other costs, but it might help.
    – ingyhere
    Apr 12 '14 at 15:11
  • @TwoThe, please post your conclusion as a separate answer so that people can comment and vote on your question and your answer differently.
    – Pacerier
    Aug 27 '14 at 18:03
  • Awesome!. Grat Work.
    – user2517419
    Dec 18 '14 at 18:02
9

Direct buffers are not meant to accelerate access from Java code. (If that were possible there was something wrong with the JVM’s own array implementation.)

These byte buffers are for interfacing with other components as you can write a byte buffer to a ByteChannel and you can use direct buffers in conjunction with native code such as with the OpenGL libraries you mentioned. It’s intended to accelerate these operation then. Using a graphics card’s chip for rendering can accelerate the overall operation to a degree more than compensating the possibly slower access to the buffer from Java code.

By the way, if you measure the access speed to a byte buffer, especially the direct byte buffers, it’s worth changing the byte order to the native byte order before acquiring a FloatBuffer view:

FloatBuffer bufferD = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(SIZE * 4)
                                .order(ByteOrder.nativeOrder())
                                .asFloatBuffer();
4

Tldr:

Use direct buffers only if we need to do efficient high-speed I/O.

If we need efficient high-speed non-I/O operations, default array is the best choice.

If we need to do buffer-like operations on a default array, and we can afford to be slow, then use an array-backed buffer.

Tsdr:

Your tests did not test any I/O operations and it's conclusion is therefore wrong.

Your conclusion states (emphasis not mine):

Direct buffers should only be used if you worry about memory usage and never access the underlying data. They are slightly slower than non-direct buffers, much slower if the underlying data is accessed, but use less memory. In addition there is an extra overhead when converting non-byte data (like float-arrays) into bytes when using a direct buffer.

That is clearly wrong. Direct buffers are meant to solve speed problems, not memory ones problems. Direct buffers should be used whenever you need high-performance I/O access. This includes file/network operations etc. It is definitely faster when used correctly and is in fact the fastest that Java API provides out-of-the-box.

When doing file/network operations, there is an extra overhead when converting non-byte data into bytes. This is true for everything, not just direct buffers.

Your conclusion also states:

Note that a backened-buffer has a Java Array backening the content of the buffer. It is recommended to do operations on this back-buffer instead of looping put/get.

This is true, but you are missing the whole point of array-backed buffers. Array-backed buffers is a facade pattern on top of arrays. Array-backed buffers will never be faster than arrays themselves since internally they have to use the array.

As such, they are there for convenience, not for speed. In other words, if you need speed, it's recommended to choose array over array-facade. If you need convenience/readability, it's recommended to choose array-facade over array for buffer-like operations on array.

Also read:

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  • You are misunderstanding and misinterpreting a few things here, and some of your comments don't even relate to the quotes. If you follow your thoughts on direct-IO further, you will reach to the same conclusion as I wrote above. Same as for the 2nd quote.
    – TwoThe
    Aug 24 '14 at 17:04
  • 1
    @TwoThe, 1) You stated "direct buffers should only be used if you worry about memory usage and never access the underlying data". This is wrong because direct buffers should be used for I/O if you need efficiency. 2) You stated "they [direct buffers] are slightly slower than non-direct buffers, much slower if the underlying data is accessed, but use less memory". This is wrong because direct buffers are faster than non-direct buffers for I/O regardless of whether we need to access the I/O from the JVM................
    – Pacerier
    Aug 24 '14 at 17:17
  • ............. 3) You stated "in addition there is an extra overhead when converting non-byte data (like float-arrays) into bytes when using a direct buffer". Assuming we are doing I/O operations, this is not a disadvantage of direct buffer, because default arrays and non-direct buffers internally also need to convert non-byte data into bytes when doing I/O. 4) Your tests did not test a single file read/write. Why?
    – Pacerier
    Aug 24 '14 at 17:17
  • I am not going to discussion your beliefs with you. If you think my conclusion is wrong, please write appropriate test code and bring facts to the table.
    – TwoThe
    Aug 25 '14 at 9:21
  • 2
    @TwoThe, My post has already brought facts to the table. See the links linked in the links I provided: e.g. the thread in the bugdatabase at bugs.java.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=4879883 . Also, why do you say that the book Java NIO is not factual?
    – Pacerier
    Aug 27 '14 at 18:01

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