7

I've got the following base code:

struct X {
  X(const char* descr) {...}
  ~X() {...} // Not virtual
  virtual void foo() const {...}
};

struct Y : public X {
  Y(const char* descr) {...}
  ~Y() {...} // Not virtual
  virtual void foo() const {...}
};


const X& factory() {
    static X sampleX{"staticX"};
    static Y sampleY{"staticY"};
    return X or Y depending of the test case;
};

And 4 test cases:

Just Y = OK

const X& var = Y{"temporaryY"};
var.foo();

Result:

X::X() // base temporaryY
Y::Y() // temporaryY
Y::foo()
Y::~Y() // temporaryY
X::~X() // base temporaryY

Just X = OK

const X& var = X{"temporaryX"};
var.foo();

Result:

X::X() // temporaryX
X::foo()
X::~X() // temporaryX

Y or X via function = OK

const X& var = factory();
var.foo();

Result:

X::X() // staticX
X::X() // base staticY
Y::Y() // staticY
X::foo() or Y::foo()
Y::~Y() // staticY
X::~X() // base staticY
X::~X() // staticX

Y or X via ternary operator = WTF?!

const X& var = false ? X{"temporaryX"} : Y{"temporaryY"};
var.foo();

Result:

X::X() // base temporaryY
Y::Y() // temporaryY
Y::~Y() // temporaryY
X::~X() // base temporaryY
X::foo()
X::~X() // base temporaryY

Could someone explain me why for the seven hells:

  • Destructor of Y is called before end of the scope?
  • X::foo() was called instead of Y::foo()?
  • Destructor of X is run twice?
  • 1)Y is created,hence it has to be destructed. 3) ~X() is called once for X and another for Y objects. 2) because the object is X? – BЈовић Sep 20 '13 at 14:22
  • @us2012 Yes, it is not, hence the question mark. What we see in Q are bits and pieces, and the problem is obviously elsewhere. – BЈовић Sep 20 '13 at 14:29
  • @BЈовић Hmm. I had just removed my earlier comment (claiming that it couldn't be slicing) after the answers below made it plausible that it could be slicing?! I am really quite interested in how this turns out. – us2012 Sep 20 '13 at 14:32
  • Note that your factory is somewhat misleading since it uses static instances, so the destructor happens not at the end of the scope of var but after main exits. – Jarod42 Sep 21 '13 at 10:50
  • @Jarod42 It was just an example to show that a reference coming from a function is treated differently. – Red XIII Sep 21 '13 at 19:45
11

What you're missing is that your temporary Y is getting copy-constructed-by-slice into a hidden temporary X that's bound to your const reference. That is then the final destructor you see and also explains why the Y is destructed earlier than expected. The reason this copy is made is that the "return" from the ternary operator is only one type. An X can't possibly ever be treated as a Y so X is the common type to be used, thus inducing the extra temporary X object.

Note that this is different from the "Just Y" test case, because in that instance a Y temporary is created and then immediately attempts to bind to a const X& which is allowed. In the ternary case, the operator itself induces an intermediate slice to the common object type of the operators operands, in this case X.

I believe you can avoid the temporary slice by casting to parent reference but I don't have access to a C++11 compiler to test this (in addition to the somewhat incomplete code in the question):

const X& var = false ? X{"temporaryX"} : static_cast<const X&>(Y{"temporaryY"});
  • 1
    Could you elaborate on why slicing happens here, while it doesn't happen for OP's "just Y" test case? Is it because there's another level of subexpressions due to the conditional operator? – us2012 Sep 20 '13 at 14:34
  • 1
    @us2012 Look at 5.16/3 of the n3690 standard draft. – Pierre Fourgeaud Sep 20 '13 at 14:38
  • Just so that noone has to reopen his copy of standard: "if E1 and E2 have class type, and the underlying class types are the same or one is a base class of the other: E1 can be converted to match E2 if the class of T2 is the same type as, or a base class of, the class of T1, (...). If the conversion is applied, E1 is changed to a prvalue of type T2 by copy-initializing a temporary of type T2 from E1 and using that temporary as the converted operand." – Red XIII Sep 20 '13 at 18:52
5

Destructor of Y is called before end of the scope?

Because an object of type Y is created then it has to be destroyed. Because it is a temporary object, it has to be destroyed at the end of the expression (after the ;).

X::foo() was called instead of Y::foo()?

Because of object slicing it calls the X:foo method. The object is sliced into a temporary X object.

This is explained in the standard at §5.16/3.

Destructor of X is run twice?

The X destructor is called once for the Y temporary object and once for var.


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