72

I've got a div that looks like a orange square

enter image description here

I'd like to draw a white X in this div somehow so that it looks more like

enter image description here

Anyway to do this in CSS or is it going to be easier to just draw this in Photoshop and use the image as the div background? The div code just looks like

div {
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    background-color: #FA6900;
    border-radius: 5px;
}
2
  • can you not just use the letter X and give it an absolute position and color white and place on top of the background
    – topcat3
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 15:36
  • 1
    @topcat3 — Think how that would sound in a screen reader.
    – Quentin
    Commented Mar 2, 2020 at 10:24

15 Answers 15

100

You want an entity known as a cross mark:

http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/274c/index.htm

The code for it is ❌ and it displays like ❌

If you want a perfectly centered cross mark, like this:

cross mark demo

try the following CSS:

div {
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    background-color: #FA6900;
    border-radius: 5px;
    position: relative;
}

div:after {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    content: "\274c"; /* use the hex value here... */
    font-size: 50px; 
    color: #FFF;
    line-height: 100px;
    text-align: center;
}

See Demo Fiddle

Cross-Browser Issue

The cross-mark entity does not display with Safari or Chrome. However, the same entity displays well in Firefox, IE and Opera.

It is safe to use the smaller but similarly shaped multiplication sign entity, × which displays as ×.

2
  • 6
    Any idea how to force a color on the cross mark in Safari? It is always rendered as red...
    – minlare
    Commented Jul 7, 2015 at 14:20
  • 7
    The hex code for the Unicode character 'MULTIPLICATION SIGN' is \D7 (U+00D7), thus the CSS code would be content: "\D7";
    – Spyryto
    Commented Sep 20, 2017 at 10:19
73

single element solution:enter image description here

body{
    background:blue;
}

div{
    width:40px;
    height:40px;
    background-color:red;
    position:relative;
    border-radius:6px;
    box-shadow:2px 2px 4px 0 white;
}

div:before,div:after{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    width:36px;
    height:4px;
    background-color:white;
    border-radius:2px;
    top:16px;
    box-shadow:0 0 2px 0 #ccc;
}

div:before{
    -webkit-transform:rotate(45deg);
    -moz-transform:rotate(45deg);
    transform:rotate(45deg);
    left:2px;
}
div:after{
    -webkit-transform:rotate(-45deg);
    -moz-transform:rotate(-45deg);
    transform:rotate(-45deg);
    right:2px;
}
<div></div>

4
  • Probably overly complex for this application, but a very good demonstration of what can be done with transforms.
    – Marc Audet
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 16:24
  • 15
    This is the real answer! Nice. Definitely not "overly complex" it is perfect because it doesn't use a font and it can scale to any size. Upvoted! Commented Sep 10, 2014 at 20:57
  • 2
    I completely agree with H Dog, this is the correct answer. Using the &#10060; in Chrome displays a question mark in a box. Using a font angles the ends of the cross. Well done Tambo!!
    – Rogala
    Commented Mar 9, 2015 at 16:01
  • 1
    Amazing solution, upvoted. I've added an answer which adds adaptive math to your work, full credit for the solution itself given to you of course. Commented Jul 10, 2020 at 18:08
48

Yet another pure CSS solution (i.e. without the use of images, characters or additional fonts), based on @Bansoa is the answer's answer .

I've simplified it and added a bit of Flexbox magic to make it responsive.

Cross in this example automatically scales to any square container, and to change the thickness of its lines one have just to tune height: 4px; (to make a cross truly responsive, you may want to set the height in percents or other relative units).

div {
    position: relative;
    height: 150px; /* this can be anything */
    width: 150px;  /* ...but maintain 1:1 aspect ratio */
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: column;
    justify-content: center;
}

div::before,
div::after {
    position: absolute;
    content: '';
    width: 100%;
    height: 4px; /* cross thickness */
    background-color: black;
}

div::before {
    transform: rotate(45deg);
}

div::after {
    transform: rotate(-45deg);
}
<div></div>

3
  • 1
    Suppose I want it to work with non-square DIVs and to not preserve aspect ratio? Commented Oct 4, 2018 at 13:15
  • 1
    @RossPresser you can use something like transform: scale(1, 0.75); to scale the cross to whatever shape you want. It has to be applied to the <div>. Commented Feb 5, 2020 at 10:26
  • 2
    Best answer here yet.
    – avia
    Commented Aug 2, 2021 at 7:26
23

You can make a pretty nice X with CSS gradients:

screenshot

demo: https://codepen.io/JasonWoof/pen/rZyRKR

code:

<span class="close-x"></span>
<style>
    .close-x {
        display: inline-block;
        width: 20px;
        height: 20px;
        border: 7px solid #f56b00;
        background:
            linear-gradient(45deg, rgba(0,0,0,0) 0%,rgba(0,0,0,0) 43%,#fff 45%,#fff 55%,rgba(0,0,0,0) 57%,rgba(0,0,0,0) 100%),
            linear-gradient(135deg, #f56b00 0%,#f56b00 43%,#fff 45%,#fff 55%,#f56b00 57%,#f56b00 100%);
    }
</style>
0
19

Yet another attempt... this one uses ×. A lot of the examples on this page only show for me as a box, but &times; works

HTML

<div class="close"></div>

CSS

.close {
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    background-color: #FA6900;
    border-radius: 5px;
}
.close:after {
    position:relative;
    content:"\d7";
    font-size:177px;
    color:white;
    font-weight:bold;
    top:-53px;
    left:-2px
}

JSFIDDLE

6
  • Reference for the &times; entity: fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/00d7/index.htm
    – Marc Audet
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 16:33
  • @MarcAudet Thanks for that link. I hadn't seen that site before, and it is pretty helpful. For your answer though, I only see boxes. Do you have a Mac by any chance?
    – Gray
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 16:35
  • I am working on a Windows 7 machine. So you don't see the cross mark in my fiddle?
    – Marc Audet
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 17:05
  • Correct. I am using Windows 7 with Chrome (same results with IE/FF). Here is a screencap: i.imgur.com/u9UwCQZ.png
    – Gray
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 17:27
  • Also a nice solution, especially with the entity. I just had to reposition it a bit to center the 'x' - see updated jsFiddle
    – Netsurfer
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 17:34
18

You could just put the letter X in the HTML inside the div and then style it with css.

See JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/uSwbN/

HTML:

<div id="orangeBox">
  <span id="x">X</span>
</div>

CSS:

#orangeBox {
  background: #f90;
  color: #fff;
  font-family: 'Helvetica', 'Arial', sans-serif;
  font-size: 2em;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-align: center;
  width: 40px;
  height: 40px;
  border-radius: 5px;
}
8
  • 8
    Since this was selected, I will extract the (possibly) useful info from my answer and put it here. &times; might look nicer than an X depending on your font.
    – Gray
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 15:55
  • 6
    All other answers proposing the use of a pseudo element (::before or ::after) are much more to prefer, because this would be semantically correct in contrast to this answer. That the questioner has chosen this answer shows that there might be a lack of understanding ...!
    – Netsurfer
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 16:05
  • 1
    @Netsurfer I agree that using the pseudo-elements are preferred, but I am not sure I would say that doing this is "semantically incorrect." There are many benefits to using a pseudo-element (I think the most important is the fact that you cannot select the text), but that doesn't make this solution wrong.
    – Gray
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 16:33
  • 4
    @Gray: It does! Because if the 'X' has a 'function' then it should be an <input> or <button> element. And if not, it is purely "presentational markup". So it is wrong in both cases. And assumed it serves only for presentational purposes then it should be done with CSS and not adding any non-content to the markup.
    – Netsurfer
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 17:06
  • @Netsurfer Interesting point of view. Thanks for the clarification. I can see your point when you put it like that.
    – Gray
    Commented Sep 20, 2013 at 17:26
11

You can use the CSS property "content":

div {
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    background-color: #FA6900;
    border-radius: 5px;
}

div:after {
    content: "X";
    font-size: 2em; 
    color: #FFF;
}

Like this: http://jsfiddle.net/HKtFV/

9

#x{
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    background-color:orange;
    position:relative;
    border-radius:2px;
}
#x::after,#x::before{
    position:absolute;
    top:9px;
    left:0px;
    content:'';
    display:block;
    width:20px;
    height:2px;
    background-color:red;
    
}
#x::after{
    -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(45deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(45deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(45deg);
    transform: rotate(45deg);
}
#x::before{
    -webkit-transform: rotate(-45deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(-45deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(-45deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(-45deg);
    transform: rotate(-45deg);
}
<div id=x>
</div>

9

I love this question! You could easily adapt my code below to be a white × on an orange square:

enter image description here

Demo fiddle here

Here is the SCSS (which could easily be converted to CSS):

$pFontSize: 18px;
p {
  font-size: $pFontSize;
}
span{
  font-weight: bold;
}
.x-overlay,
.x-emoji-overlay {
  position: relative;
}

.x-overlay,
.x-emoji-overlay {
  &:after {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    color: red;
    text-align: center;
  }
}

.x-overlay:after {
  content: '\d7';
  font-size: 3 * $pFontSize;
  line-height: $pFontSize;
  opacity: 0.7;
}

.x-emoji-overlay:after {
  content: "\274c";
  padding: 3px;
  font-size: 1.5 * $pFontSize;
  line-height: $pFontSize;
  opacity: 0.5;
}

.strike {
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
}

.strike::before {
  content: '';
  border-bottom: 2px solid red;
  width: 110%;
  position: absolute;
  left: -2px;
  top: 46%;
}

.crossed-out {
  /*inspired by https://www.tjvantoll.com/2013/09/12/building-custom-text-strikethroughs-with-css/*/
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  &::before,
  &::after {
    content: '';
    width: 110%;
    position: absolute;
    left: -2px;
    top: 45%;
    opacity: 0.7;
  }
  &::before {
    border-bottom: 2px solid red;
    -webkit-transform: skewY(-20deg);
    transform: skewY(-20deg);
  }
  &::after {
    border-bottom: 2px solid red;
    -webkit-transform: skewY(20deg);
    transform: skewY(20deg);
  }
}
2
  • There is a way to stretch the "x-emoji-overlay" solution for longer text ? The "crossed-out" work fine anyway
    – 4535992
    Commented Oct 22, 2023 at 9:34
  • I wouldn't be surprised if there is a way. But yeah you could probably edit the styles of "crossed-out" to achieve what you want.
    – Ryan
    Commented Oct 22, 2023 at 12:52
5

You could do this by styling an "x"

text-align: center;
font-size: 120px;
line-height: 100px;
color: white;
font-family: monospace;

http://jsfiddle.net/Ncvyj/1/

4

Here is a single div and dynamic size version without using pseudo element.

body {
  display: flex;
  gap: 30px;
}

.x {
  --color: #444;
  --l: 5px; /* line-width */
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  background: linear-gradient(to top right, transparent calc(50% - var(--l) / 2), var(--color) calc(50% - var(--l) / 2) calc(50% + var(--l) / 2), transparent calc(50% + var(--l) / 2)),
              linear-gradient(to bottom right, transparent calc(50% - var(--l) / 2), var(--color) calc(50% - var(--l) / 2) calc(50% + var(--l) / 2), transparent calc(50% + var(--l) / 2));
              
  --clip-path: polygon(var(--l) 0%, calc(100% - var(--l)) 0%, 100% var(--l), 100% calc(100% - var(--l)), calc(100% - var(--l)) 100%, var(--l) 100%, 0% calc(100% - var(--l)), 0% var(--l));
  -webkit-clip-path: var(--clip-path);
          clip-path: var(--clip-path);
}
<div class="x"></div>

<div class="x" style="--l: 10px;"></div>

<div class="x" style="--l: 15px; --color: red"></div>

<div class="x" style="--l: 15px; --color: dodgerblue; width: 100px; height: 100px;"></div>

4

A modern answer with good browser support.

<span>&times;</span>

This technically puts the multiplication symbol there, but no one will really notice (found some websites that have a popup box and most use this for the x button).

If you need more control you can style it with color opacity etc...

example (index.html)

<span class="x-button">&times;</span>

styles.css

span.x-button {
    color:gray;
    opacity:0.7;
    font-size:1.5em;
}

Result (first example)

<span>&times</span>

Result (2nd example)

span {
    color:gray;
    opacity:0.7;
    font-size:1.5em;
}
<span class="x-button">&times;</span>

Note: you can highlight this unlike other solutions, but this may not be desirable depending on the application. You can solve this in pure css too, just add

    user-select:none;
    -webkit-user-select:none;
1
  • You also shouldn't really need to worry about the aspect ratio as most English text is already 1:1. (though it is often centered).
    – Fighter178
    Commented Nov 23, 2022 at 23:46
1

HTML

<div class="close-orange"></div>

CSS

.close-orange {
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  background-color: #FA6900;
  border-radius: 5px;
}
.close-orange:before,.close-orange:after{
  content:'';
  position:absolute;
  width: 50px;
  height: 4px;
  background-color:white;
  border-radius:2px;
  top: 55px;
}
.close-orange:before{
  -webkit-transform:rotate(45deg);
  -moz-transform:rotate(45deg);
  transform:rotate(45deg);
  left: 32.5px;
}
.close-orange:after{
  -webkit-transform:rotate(-45deg);
  -moz-transform:rotate(-45deg);
  transform:rotate(-45deg);
  left: 32.5px;
}

https://jsfiddle.net/cooperwebdesign/dw4xd289/

0

This is an adaptable version of the amazing solution provided by @Gildas.Tambo elsewhere in this page. Simply change the values of the variables at the top to change the size of the "X".

Credit for the solution itself goes to Gildas. All I've done is given it adaptable math.

:root {
  /* Width and height of the box containing the "X" */
  --BUTTON_W:             40px;
  /* This is the length of either of the 2 lines which form the "X", as a
  percentage of the width of the button. */
  --CLOSE_X_W:            95%;
  /* Thickness of the lines of the "X" */
  --CLOSE_X_THICKNESS:    4px;
}
  

body{
    background:blue;
}

div{
    width:           var(--BUTTON_W);
    height:          var(--BUTTON_W);
    background-color:red;
    position:        relative;
    border-radius:   6px;
    box-shadow:      2px 2px 4px 0 white;
}

/* The "X" in the button. "before" and "after" each represent one of the two lines of the "X" */
div:before,div:after{
    content:         '';
    position:        absolute;
    width:           var(--CLOSE_X_W);
    height:          var(--CLOSE_X_THICKNESS);
    background-color:white;
    border-radius:   2px;
    top:             calc(50% - var(--CLOSE_X_THICKNESS) / 2);
    box-shadow:      0 0 2px 0 #ccc;
}
/* One line of the "X" */
div:before{
    -webkit-transform:rotate(45deg);
    -moz-transform:   rotate(45deg);
    transform:        rotate(45deg);
    left:             calc((100% - var(--CLOSE_X_W)) / 2);
}
/* The other line of the "X" */
div:after{
    -webkit-transform:rotate(-45deg);
    -moz-transform:   rotate(-45deg);
    transform:        rotate(-45deg);
    right:            calc((100% - var(--CLOSE_X_W)) / 2);
}
<div></div>

-1

Check & and Cross:

<span class='act-html-check'></span>
<span class='act-html-cross'><span class='act-html-cross'></span></span>

<style type="text/css">
span.act-html-check {
                display: inline-block;
                width: 12px;
                height: 18px;
                border: solid limegreen;
                border-width: 0 5px 5px 0;
                transform: rotate( 45deg);
            }


            span.act-html-cross {
                display: inline-block;
                width: 10px;
                height: 10px;
                border: solid red;
                border-width: 0 5px 5px 0;
                transform: rotate( 45deg);
                position: relative;
            }

            span.act-html-cross > span { {
                transform: rotate( -180deg);
                position: absolute;
                left: 9px;
                top: 9px;
            }
</style>

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