8

I would like to simulate GNU's head -n -3, which prints all lines except the last 3, because head on FreeBSD doesn't have this feature. So I am thinking of something like

seq 1 10 | perl -ne ...

Here I have used 10 lines, but it can be any number larger than 3.

Can it be done in Perl or some other way on FreeBSD in BASH?

A super primitive solution would be

seq 1 10 | sed '$d' | sed '$d' | sed '$d'

10 Answers 10

6

This works with a pipe as well as an input file:

seq 1 10 | perl -e'@x=<>;print@x[0..$#x-3]'
  • 1
    for can be dropped here – Сухой27 Sep 20 '13 at 21:10
  • 1
    @poitroae: Firstly, I have no idea what you are asking me. Secondly, the OP posted the primitive solution after my Answer was accepted. – toolic Sep 21 '13 at 12:48
  • 2
    A non-ideal solution for large files, because this one slurps the entire content into @x before printing any of it, having to keep the whole lot in memory. For a neater solution that lacks this drawback see @greg-bacon 's reply instead. – LeoNerd Sep 22 '13 at 10:31
11
seq 1 10 | perl -e '@x=("")x3;while(<>){print shift @x;push @x,$_}'

or

perl -e '@x=("")x3;while(<>){print shift @x;push @x,$_}' file

or

command | perl -pe 'BEGIN{@x=("")x3}push @x,$_;$_=shift @x'
perl -pe 'BEGIN{@x=("")x3}push @x,$_;$_=shift @x' file
  • 6
    Unlike toolic's solution, this doesn't keep the entire file in memory, just the last 3 lines read. – cjm Sep 20 '13 at 18:38
  • perhaps -ne and BEGIN{} – Сухой27 Sep 20 '13 at 21:08
9
seq 1 10 | perl -ne 'push @l, $_; print shift @l if @l > 3'
  • 1
    best answer so far – Сухой27 Sep 21 '13 at 18:06
  • 1
    Best answer so far because it's the only one that doesn't slurp the entire file before it starts to print output. – LeoNerd Sep 22 '13 at 10:30
  • @LeoNerd it's not the only one – Сухой27 Sep 22 '13 at 12:54
7

Pure bash and simple tools (wc and cut):

head -n $(($(wc -l file | cut -c-8)-3)) file

Disclaimer - I don't have access to FreeBSD right now, but this does work on OSX bash.

  • Works also in a FreeBSD zsh. – Slaven Rezic Sep 20 '13 at 18:36
  • 3
    This has to read the file twice, though, so it won't work on a pipe. – cjm Sep 20 '13 at 18:49
  • @cjm - True. My other answer accepts input from a pipe, and doesn't buffer the entire file at the beginning: stackoverflow.com/a/19162619/2113226 – Digital Trauma Jan 24 '14 at 1:42
5

Nobody seems to have use sed and tac, so here's one:

$ seq 10 | tac | sed '1,3d' | tac
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
  • Thanks - I'd never even heard of the tac command! – Digital Trauma Sep 21 '13 at 20:49
2

how about :

 seq 1 10 | perl -ne 'print if ( !eof  )' | perl -ne 'print if ( !eof  )' | perl -ne 'print if ( !eof  )' 
  • eof or print might be shorter. – Сухой27 Sep 20 '13 at 21:15
  • @mpapec , doing a wc -l file might be the fastest way , i was just having fun. – michael501 Sep 20 '13 at 21:20
  • @mpapec , sort of : something like export cnt=$(wc -l afile) and then the perl script : printfile upto $ENV{cnt} - 3 – michael501 Sep 21 '13 at 22:13
2

This awk one-liner seems to do the job:

awk '{a[NR%4]=$0}NR>3{print a[(NR-3)%4]}' file
1

Or do it with bash alone if you have version 4.0 or newer:

seq 1 10 | (readarray -t LINES; printf '%s\n' "${LINES[@]:(-3)}")

Update: This one would remove the last three lines instead of showing only them.

seq 1 10 | (readarray -t L; C=${#L[@]}; printf '%s\n' "${L[@]:0:(C > 3 ? C - 3 : 0)}")

For convenience it could be placed on a function:

function exclude_last_three {
    local L C
    readarray -t L; C=${#L[@]}
    printf '%s\n' "${L[@]:0:(C > 3 ? C - 3 : 0)}"
}

seq 1 10  | exclude_last_three
seq 11 20 | exclude_last_three
  • It keeps the last 3 lines instead of removing them. – Sandra Schlichting Sep 20 '13 at 20:25
1

Here's a late answer, because I was running into something like this yesterday.

This solution is:

  • pure bash
  • one-liner
  • reads the input stream only once
  • reads the input stream line-by-line, not all at once

Tested on Ubuntu, Redhat and OSX.

$ seq 1 10 | { n=3; i=1; while IFS= read -r ln; do [ $i -gt $n ] && cat <<< "${buf[$((i%n))]}"; buf[$((i%n))]="$ln"; ((i++)); done; }
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
$ 

It works by reading lines into a circular buffer implemented as an n-element array.

n is the number of lines to cut off the end of the file.

For every line i we read, we can echo the line i-n from the circular buffer, then store the line i in the circular buffer. Nothing is echoed until the first n lines are read. (i mod n) is the index into the array which implements the circular buffer.

Because the requirement is for a one-liner, I tried to make it fairly brief, unfortunately at the expense of readability.

0

Another Awk solution that only uses minimal amount of buffers and prints lines quickly without needing to read all the lines first. It can also be used with pipes and large files.

awk 'BEGIN{X = 3; for(i = 0; i < X; ++i)getline a[i]}{i %= X; print a[i]; a[i++] = $0}'

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