17

Is there something like Matlab's procrustes function in NumPy/SciPy or related libraries?


For reference. Procrustes analysis aims to align 2 sets of points (in other words, 2 shapes) to minimize square distance between them by removing scale, translation and rotation warp components.

Example in Matlab:

X = [0 1; 2 3; 4 5; 6 7; 8 9];   % first shape
R = [1 2; 2 1];                  % rotation matrix
t = [3 5];                       % translation vector
Y = X * R + repmat(t, 5, 1);     % warped shape, no scale and no distortion
[d Z] = procrustes(X, Y);        % Z is Y aligned back to X
Z

Z =

  0.0000    1.0000
  2.0000    3.0000
  4.0000    5.0000
  6.0000    7.0000
  8.0000    9.0000

Same task in NumPy:

X = arange(10).reshape((5, 2))
R = array([[1, 2], [2, 1]])
t = array([3, 5])
Y = dot(X, R) + t
Z = ???

Note: I'm only interested in aligned shape, since square error (variable d in Matlab code) is easily computed from 2 shapes.

2

4 Answers 4

27

I'm not aware of any pre-existing implementation in Python, but it's easy to take a look at the MATLAB code using edit procrustes.m and port it to Numpy:

def procrustes(X, Y, scaling=True, reflection='best'):
    """
    A port of MATLAB's `procrustes` function to Numpy.

    Procrustes analysis determines a linear transformation (translation,
    reflection, orthogonal rotation and scaling) of the points in Y to best
    conform them to the points in matrix X, using the sum of squared errors
    as the goodness of fit criterion.

        d, Z, [tform] = procrustes(X, Y)

    Inputs:
    ------------
    X, Y    
        matrices of target and input coordinates. they must have equal
        numbers of  points (rows), but Y may have fewer dimensions
        (columns) than X.

    scaling 
        if False, the scaling component of the transformation is forced
        to 1

    reflection
        if 'best' (default), the transformation solution may or may not
        include a reflection component, depending on which fits the data
        best. setting reflection to True or False forces a solution with
        reflection or no reflection respectively.

    Outputs
    ------------
    d       
        the residual sum of squared errors, normalized according to a
        measure of the scale of X, ((X - X.mean(0))**2).sum()

    Z
        the matrix of transformed Y-values

    tform   
        a dict specifying the rotation, translation and scaling that
        maps X --> Y

    """

    n,m = X.shape
    ny,my = Y.shape

    muX = X.mean(0)
    muY = Y.mean(0)

    X0 = X - muX
    Y0 = Y - muY

    ssX = (X0**2.).sum()
    ssY = (Y0**2.).sum()

    # centred Frobenius norm
    normX = np.sqrt(ssX)
    normY = np.sqrt(ssY)

    # scale to equal (unit) norm
    X0 /= normX
    Y0 /= normY

    if my < m:
        Y0 = np.concatenate((Y0, np.zeros(n, m-my)),0)

    # optimum rotation matrix of Y
    A = np.dot(X0.T, Y0)
    U,s,Vt = np.linalg.svd(A,full_matrices=False)
    V = Vt.T
    T = np.dot(V, U.T)

    if reflection != 'best':

        # does the current solution use a reflection?
        have_reflection = np.linalg.det(T) < 0

        # if that's not what was specified, force another reflection
        if reflection != have_reflection:
            V[:,-1] *= -1
            s[-1] *= -1
            T = np.dot(V, U.T)

    traceTA = s.sum()

    if scaling:

        # optimum scaling of Y
        b = traceTA * normX / normY

        # standarised distance between X and b*Y*T + c
        d = 1 - traceTA**2

        # transformed coords
        Z = normX*traceTA*np.dot(Y0, T) + muX

    else:
        b = 1
        d = 1 + ssY/ssX - 2 * traceTA * normY / normX
        Z = normY*np.dot(Y0, T) + muX

    # transformation matrix
    if my < m:
        T = T[:my,:]
    c = muX - b*np.dot(muY, T)
    
    #transformation values 
    tform = {'rotation':T, 'scale':b, 'translation':c}
   
    return d, Z, tform
7
  • 2
    Remember that the code is owned by Mathworks, and just making a translation to a different language is likely not enough avoid their copyright, which your posting here may violate.
    – pv.
    Sep 21, 2013 at 12:30
  • @pv. Yep, fair point. I usually do this sort of thing for myself as a shortcut to understanding how the function works, rather than for general consumption. I'll remove my answer if there are any complaints.
    – ali_m
    Sep 21, 2013 at 13:31
  • Can you elaborate what is reflection component?
    – mrgloom
    Sep 17, 2018 at 18:14
  • @mrgloom that's referring to whether or not the solution is permitted to contain a reflection. In layman's terms, whether or not the transformation is allowed to "flip" or "mirror" the data in addition to rotating it.
    – Wacov
    Jan 30, 2019 at 3:04
  • @pv: I dont mean to start a chat, but... Wouldn't that depend on the country? Also, Matlab functions often provide literature references which one could have read and implemented instead of adapting Mathwork's code. Where should we expect judges and court to draw the line between a code being in public domain (since its available in text and equations in a paper) and it being copyright-able (as some Matlab functions might be).
    – Mefitico
    Apr 10, 2019 at 14:28
16

There is a Scipy function for it: scipy.spatial.procrustes

I'm just posting its example here:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> from scipy.spatial import procrustes

>>> a = np.array([[1, 3], [1, 2], [1, 1], [2, 1]], 'd')
>>> b = np.array([[4, -2], [4, -4], [4, -6], [2, -6]], 'd')
>>> mtx1, mtx2, disparity = procrustes(a, b)
>>> round(disparity)
0.0
0

You can have both Ordinary Procrustes Analysis and Generalized Procrustes Analysis in python with something like this:

import numpy as np
        
def opa(a, b):
    aT = a.mean(0)
    bT = b.mean(0)
    A = a - aT 
    B = b - bT
    aS = np.sum(A * A)**.5
    bS = np.sum(B * B)**.5
    A /= aS
    B /= bS
    U, _, V = np.linalg.svd(np.dot(B.T, A))
    aR = np.dot(U, V)
    if np.linalg.det(aR) < 0:
        V[1] *= -1
        aR = np.dot(U, V)
    aS = aS / bS
    aT-= (bT.dot(aR) * aS)
    aD = (np.sum((A - B.dot(aR))**2) / len(a))**.5
    return aR, aS, aT, aD 
        
def gpa(v, n=-1):
    if n < 0:
        p = avg(v)
    else:
        p = v[n]
    l = len(v)
    r, s, t, d = np.ndarray((4, l), object)
    for i in range(l):
        r[i], s[i], t[i], d[i] = opa(p, v[i]) 
    return r, s, t, d

def avg(v):
    v_= np.copy(v)
    l = len(v_) 
    R, S, T = [list(np.zeros(l)) for _ in range(3)]
    for i, j in np.ndindex(l, l):
        r, s, t, _ = opa(v_[i], v_[j]) 
        R[j] += np.arccos(min(1, max(-1, np.trace(r[:1])))) * np.sign(r[1][0]) 
        S[j] += s 
        T[j] += t 
    for i in range(l):
        a = R[i] / l
        r = [np.cos(a), -np.sin(a)], [np.sin(a), np.cos(a)]
        v_[i] = v_[i].dot(r) * (S[i] / l) + (T[i] / l) 
    return v_.mean(0)

For testing purposes, the output of each algorithm can be visualized as follows:

import matplotlib.pyplot as p; p.rcParams['toolbar'] = 'None';

def plt(o, e, b):
    p.figure(figsize=(10, 10), dpi=72, facecolor='w').add_axes([0.05, 0.05, 0.9, 0.9], aspect='equal')
    p.plot(0, 0, marker='x', mew=1, ms=10, c='g', zorder=2, clip_on=False)
    p.gcf().canvas.set_window_title('%f' % e)
    x = np.ravel(o[0].T[0])
    y = np.ravel(o[0].T[1])
    p.xlim(min(x), max(x)) 
    p.ylim(min(y), max(y))
    a = []
    for i, j in np.ndindex(len(o), 2):
        a.append(o[i].T[j])    
    O = p.plot(*a, marker='x', mew=1, ms=10, lw=.25, c='b', zorder=0, clip_on=False)
    O[0].set(c='r', zorder=1)
    if not b:
        O[2].set_color('b')
        O[2].set_alpha(0.4)
    p.axis('off')     
    p.show()

# Fly wings example (Klingenberg, 2015 | https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procrustes_analysis)
arr1 = np.array([[588.0, 443.0], [178.0, 443.0], [56.0, 436.0], [50.0, 376.0], [129.0, 360.0], [15.0, 342.0], [92.0, 293.0], [79.0, 269.0], [276.0, 295.0], [281.0, 331.0], [785.0, 260.0], [754.0, 174.0], [405.0, 233.0], [386.0, 167.0], [466.0, 59.0]])
arr2 = np.array([[477.0, 557.0], [130.129, 374.307], [52.0, 334.0], [67.662, 306.953], [111.916, 323.0], [55.119, 275.854], [107.935, 277.723], [101.899, 259.73], [175.0, 329.0], [171.0, 345.0], [589.0, 527.0], [591.0, 468.0], [299.0, 363.0], [306.0, 317.0], [406.0, 288.0]])

def opa_out(a):
    r, s, t, d = opa(a[0], a[1])
    a[1] = a[1].dot(r) * s + t
    return a, d, False
plt(*opa_out([arr1, arr2, np.matrix.copy(arr2)]))

def gpa_out(a):
    g = gpa(a, -1) 
    D = [avg(a)]
    for i in range(len(a)):
        D.append(a[i].dot(g[0][i]) * g[1][i] + g[2][i])
    return D, sum(g[3])/len(a), True 
plt(*gpa_out([arr1, arr2]))
0
0

Probably you want to try this package with various flavors of different Procrustes methods, https://github.com/theochem/procrustes.

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