4

I'm writing a C program to study the usage of function strtok(). Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

main() {
    char abc[100] = "ls &";
    char *tok;

    tok = strtok(abc, " ");
    while (tok != NULL) {
        printf("%s", tok);
        tok = strtok(NULL, " ");
    }
    printf("\n\n\n\n\n%s", tok);
    return 0;
}

It is printing the following output:

ls&




(null)

But I want it to print & at the second printf statement. How do I do it? I need this part for my homework project.

10
  • 1
    Your while loop continues until tok is NULL, right? So in the second printf statement, tok is NULL. Is that surprising?
    – rici
    Sep 21, 2013 at 0:51
  • 3
    Add a newline to the first printf()
    – this
    Sep 21, 2013 at 0:52
  • And if you need help with strtok() you can always consult the documentation.
    – WhozCraig
    Sep 21, 2013 at 0:53
  • @rici Yeah it is printing NULL. How to I make it to print '&' instead? Sep 21, 2013 at 0:53
  • @user2201650: How many times do you think the loop executes? What do you think it prints the first time?
    – rici
    Sep 21, 2013 at 0:55

2 Answers 2

8
  1. Make sure you can identify the limits of what you print when you're printing.
  2. Output newlines at the end of printed messages; the information is more likely to appear in a timely manner if you do that.
  3. Don't print NULL pointers as strings; not all versions of printf() will behave nicely — some of them dump core.

Code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char abc[] = "ls &";
    char *tok;
    char *ptr = abc;

    while ((tok = strtok(ptr, " ")) != NULL)
    {
        printf("<<%s>>\n", tok);
        ptr = NULL;
    }
    return 0;
}

Or (optimized, courtesy of self.):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char abc[] = "ls &";
    char *tok = abc;

    while ((tok = strtok(tok, " ")) != NULL)
    {
        printf("<<%s>>\n", tok);
        tok = NULL;
    }
    return 0;
}

Output:

<<ls>>
<<&>>

You can choose your own marker characters, but when not messing with XML or HTML, I find the double angle brackets reasonably good for the job.

You can also use your loop structure at the cost of writing a second call to strtok() (which is a minimal cost, but might be argued to violate the DRY principle: Don't Repeat Yourself):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char abc[] = "ls &";
    char *tok = strtok(abc, " ");

    while (tok != NULL)
    {
        printf("<<%s>>\n", tok);
        tok = strtok(NULL, " ");
    }
    return 0;
}

Same output.


Revised requirement

I would like to add a printf() statement outside the while loop and print '&' outside. I need it since I want to compare it later with another variable in the program. Is there any way to do so?

Yes, there is usually a way to do almost anything. This seems to work. It also works sanely if there are more tokens to parse, or if there's only the & to parse, or if there are no tokens. Clearly, the body of the outer loop could be made into a function if you so wished; it would be sensible to do so, even.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char tests[][16] =
    {
        "ls -l -s &",
        "ls &",
        "&",
        "    ",
        ""
    };

    for (size_t i = 0; i < sizeof(tests)/sizeof(tests[0]); i++)
    {
        printf("Initially: <<%s>>\n", tests[i]);
        char *tok1 = strtok(tests[i], " ");
        char *tok;

        while ((tok = strtok(NULL, " ")) != NULL)
        {
            printf("Loop body: <<%s>>\n", tok1);
            tok1 = tok;
        }
        if (tok1 != NULL)
            printf("Post loop: <<%s>>\n", tok1);
    }

    return 0;
}

Output:

Initially: <<ls -l -s &>>
Loop body: <<ls>>
Loop body: <<-l>>
Loop body: <<-s>>
Post loop: <<&>>
Initially: <<ls &>>
Loop body: <<ls>>
Post loop: <<&>>
Initially: <<&>>
Post loop: <<&>>
Initially: <<    >>
Initially: <<>>

Note how the markers pay for themselves in the last two examples. You couldn't tell those apart without the markers.

4
  • I would like to add a printf statement outside the while loop and print '&' outside. I need it since I want to compare it later with another variable in the program. Is there any way to do so? Sep 21, 2013 at 1:05
  • Well, I suppose you can do it; most things can be done. Are you sure it is worth it? Give me a few minutes while I think about it. It is not … an obvious requirement … shall we say. Sep 21, 2013 at 1:07
  • @JonathanLeffler Or without the extra variable and strtok pastebin.com/4xHG9yGX
    – this
    Sep 21, 2013 at 1:07
  • @self. I just looked at your pasted code; you're right, it can be made slicker. I've done that in the past; I'd forgotten this time around. Sep 21, 2013 at 1:21
0

you should write sth like this:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

int main();
{
char string[] = "ls &"; //you should not write 100, cuz you waste memory
char *pointer;

pointer = strtok(string, " "); //skip only spaces
while(pointer != NULL)
   {
      printf("%s\n", pointer);
      pointer = strtok(string, " ");
   }
return 0;
}
2
  • 4
    After the first call to strtok(), you must use NULL as the first argument to indicate that you are continuing where the previous call left off. Sep 21, 2013 at 17:33
  • 1
    This code is buggy, you should replace strtok first value inside the while loop to NULL
    – dear_tzvi
    Jun 9, 2016 at 14:54

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