207

What is the difference between %d and %i when used as format specifiers in printf and scanf?

285

They are the same when used for output, e.g. with printf.

However, these are different when used as input specifier e.g. with scanf, where %d scans an integer as a signed decimal number, but %i defaults to decimal but also allows hexadecimal (if preceded by 0x) and octal (if preceded by 0).

So 033 would be 27 with %i but 33 with %d.

| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    Expecting an int with possible zero-padding in sscanf seems to me to be the most reasonable default behavior. If you're not expecting Octal, that could cause subtle bugs. So this suggests that %d is a good specifier to use when you have to choose one arbitrarily, unless you explicitly want to read octal and/or hex. – Eliot Sep 6 '13 at 22:28
  • 2
    Ah! That makes sense! Now that I know what to look for, this can also be seen in the documentation for printf and scanf. – Gabriel Staples Nov 8 '18 at 19:49
67

These are identical for printf but different for scanf. For printf, both %d and %i designate a signed decimal integer. For scanf, %d and %i also means a signed integer but %i inteprets the input as a hexadecimal number if preceded by 0x and octal if preceded by 0 and otherwise interprets the input as decimal.

| improve this answer | |
20

There is no difference between the %i and %d format specifiers for printf. We can see this by going to the draft C99 standard section 7.19.6.1 The fprintf function which also covers printf with respect to format specifiers and it says in paragraph 8:

The conversion specifiers and their meanings are:

and includes the following bullet:

d,i     The int argument is converted to signed decimal in the style
        [−]dddd. The precision specifies the minimum number of digits to
        appear; if the value being converted can be represented in fewer
        digits, it is expanded with leading zeros. The default precision is
        1. The result of converting a zero value with a precision of zero is
        no characters.

On the other hand for scanf there is a difference, %d assume base 10 while %i auto detects the base. We can see this by going to section 7.19.6.2 The fscanf function which covers scanf with respect to format specifier, in paragraph 12 it says:

The conversion specifiers and their meanings are:

and includes the following:

d     Matches an optionally signed decimal integer, whose format is the
      same as expected for the subject sequence of the strtol function with
      the value 10 for the base argument. The corresponding argument shall
      be a pointer to signed integer.

i     Matches an optionally signed integer, whose format is the same as
      expected for the subject sequence of the strtol function with the
      value 0 for the base argument. The corresponding argument shall be a
      pointer to signed integer.
| improve this answer | |
4

There isn't any in printf - the two are synonyms.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    There's a difference when used in scanf() format string as the accepted answer says. – J...S Feb 16 '18 at 10:32

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.