18

Here's a program I wrote to copy a string constant.

When the program is run it crashes. Why is this happening ?

#include <stdio.h>

char *alpha = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
char c;
char *l;

main(){
   while((c = *alpha++)!='\0')
       *l++ = *alpha;
   printf("%s\n",l);
}
1
  • 1
    You need to ALLOCATE SPACE for "l". For example: char *l = malloc(strlen(alpha)+1);. PS: Definitely familiarize yourself with the debugger. It would show you exactly where it's crashing ... which is important to understanding why, and fixing the problem. IMHO...
    – paulsm4
    Commented Sep 21, 2013 at 23:42

7 Answers 7

21

To copy strings in C, you can use strcpy. Here is an example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

const char * my_str = "Content";
char * my_copy;
my_copy = malloc(sizeof(char) * (strlen(my_str) + 1));
strcpy(my_copy,my_str);

If you want to avoid accidental buffer overflows, use strncpy instead of strcpy. For example:

const char * my_str = "Content";
const size_t len_my_str = strlen(my_str) + 1;
char * my_copy = malloc(len_my_str);
strncpy(my_copy, my_str, len_my_str);
4
  • 12
    "sizeof(char)" is unnecessary - most would argue you should leave it out. IMHO... It's also worth noting that C has strdup(), which combines malloc () and strcpy() together. But the most important point is to allocate space for "*" to point to.
    – paulsm4
    Commented Sep 21, 2013 at 23:45
  • 17
    The space you malloc is one byte short for the trailing \0.
    – Yu Hao
    Commented Sep 22, 2013 at 0:57
  • 1
    strdup is not really a good choice at all since it isn't a C standard function.
    – Lundin
    Commented Aug 16, 2016 at 9:09
  • 1
    @YuHao This issue has finally been resolved, after only a bit more than 4 years. :)
    – Stefnotch
    Commented Feb 19, 2018 at 14:11
17

To perform such manual copy:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    char* orig_str = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    char* ptr = orig_str;

    // Memory layout for orig_str:
    // ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    // |0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10|11|12|13|14|15|16|17|18|19|20|21|22|23|24|25|26|  --> indices
    // ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    // |A|B|C|D|E|F|G|H|I|J|K |L |M |N |O |P |Q |R |S |T |U |V |W |X |Y |Z |\0|  --> data
    // ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    int orig_str_size = 0;
    char* bkup_copy = NULL;

    // Count the number of characters in the original string
    while (*ptr++ != '\0')
        orig_str_size++;        

    printf("Size of the original string: %d\n", orig_str_size);

    /* Dynamically allocate space for the backup copy */ 

    // Why orig_str_size plus 1? We add +1 to account for the mandatory 
    // '\0' at the end of the string.
    bkup_copy = (char*) malloc((orig_str_size+1) * sizeof(char));

    // Place the '\0' character at the end of the backup string.
    bkup_copy[orig_str_size] = '\0'; 

    // Current memory layout for bkup_copy:
    // ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    // |0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10|11|12|13|14|15|16|17|18|19|20|21|22|23|24|25|26|  --> indices
    // ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    // | | | | | | | | | | |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |\0|  --> data
    // ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    /* Finally, copy the characters from one string to the other */ 

    // Remember to reset the helper pointer so it points to the beginning 
    // of the original string!
    ptr = &orig_str[0]; 
    int idx = 0;
    while (*ptr != '\0')
        bkup_copy[idx++] = *ptr++;

    printf("Original String: %s\n", orig_str);   
    printf("Backup String: %s\n", bkup_copy);

    return 0;
}
2
  • You probably intended to write bkup_copy = (char*) malloc((orig_str_size+1) * sizeof(char)); (notice the brackets around orig_str_size+1) ? Commented Jun 14, 2014 at 17:44
  • 1
    I think that because we are talking about pointers, this code could have more sense with: ptr = orig_str (logically it is the same of ptr = &orig_str[0]) but a little bit more elegant. This is only my opinion.
    – b3h3m0th
    Commented Aug 21, 2015 at 11:55
3

You need to allocate space for l. Currently it is pointing to a random spot in memory, and if you try to write to that spot, the operating system is likely to shut down (AKA crash) your application. If you want your code to work as is, then assign some space for l with malloc() or create l as an character array with enough space to hold "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ" plus the NULL terminator.

See http://cslibrary.stanford.edu/106/ for a primer on pointers.

0
0

Copy a string "constant/literal/pointer"

char *str = "some string thats not malloc'd";
char *tmp = NULL; 
int i = 0; 
for (i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
    tmp = &str[i];
}
printf("%s\n", tmp);

Reversed

char *str = "some stupid string"; 
char *tmp, *ptr = NULL; 
ptr = str;
while (*str) { ++str; } 
int len = str - ptr;
int i = 0;
for (i = len; i > 11; i--) {
    tmp = &ptr[i];
} 
printf("%s\n", tmp); 

tmp = &blah[i] can be interchanged with tmp = &(*(blah + i)).

0
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#define MAX_LENGTH 256
int main(void) {
    char *original, *copy, *start; //three character pointers
    original = malloc(sizeof(char) * MAX_LENGTH); //assigning memory for strings is good practice
    gets(original); //get original string from input
    copy = malloc(sizeof(char) * (strlen(original)+1)); //+1 for \0

    start = copy;
    while((*original)!='\0')
       *copy++ = *original++;
    *copy = '\0';
    copy = start;

    printf("The copy of input string is \"%s\".",copy);
    return 0;
}
0

You can directly do the below code:

char *alpha = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
char *l = alpha;

If your code was below:

const char *alpha = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
const char *l = alpha;

:)

0

cpy function will take two char pointers and the src pointer will point to the initial character of src(char array) defined in the main function, and same as the des pointer will point to the initial location of des(char array) defined in the main function and the while loop value of the src pointer will assign the value to des pointer and increment the pointer to the next element, this will happen until while loop encountered with null and comes out of the loop and des pointer will simply assigned null after taking all the values.

#include<stdio.h>
void cpy(char *src,char *des)
{
     while(*(des++) = *(src++));
     *des = '\0';
}

int main()
{
     char src[100];
     char des[100];
     gets(src);
     cpy(src,des);
     printf("%s",des);
}

Output: Image

1
  • Please add some explanation of how this solves the problem posed. Just posting code means your answer is of low quality and value. Commented Aug 11, 2017 at 13:53

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