186

Suppose you have a class Person :

public class Person
{
   public string Name { get; set;}
   public IEnumerable<Role> Roles {get; set;}
}

I should obviously instantiate the Roles in the constructor. Now, I used to do it with a List like this :

public Person()
{
   Roles = new List<Role>();
}

But I discovered this static method in the System.Linq namespace

IEnumerable<T> Enumerable.Empty<T>();

From MSDN:

The Empty(TResult)() method caches an empty sequence of type TResult. When the object it returns is enumerated, it yields no elements.

In some cases, this method is useful for passing an empty sequence to a user-defined method that takes an IEnumerable(T). It can also be used to generate a neutral element for methods such as Union. See the Example section for an example of this use of

So is it better to write the constructor like that? Do you use it? Why? or if not, Why not?

public Person()
{
   Roles = Enumerable.Empty<Role>();
}
7
  • 1
    This is a Data class. I intend to use this class as a Model class when implementing a repository pattern with Entity Framework 4.0 (playing around...). so I think it's fine to have a public setter here, isn't it?
    – Stéphane
    Dec 12, 2009 at 17:46
  • 1
    serbech, how will you Add a role (inside Person) when other code can installed any kind of IEnumerable derived class for the list? What will you cast it to? Dec 12, 2009 at 18:03
  • I see your point, I should probably have a IList internally, or even a List here? And that would just remove my original problem...
    – Stéphane
    Dec 12, 2009 at 18:43
  • I use Enumerable.Empty<T> in unit testing to indicate unhappy path tests to help communicate the intent. As many have already pointed it out the bonus is no allocation on the GC which helps when your unit tests number in the hundreds or more.
    – jjhayter
    Jun 9, 2015 at 16:51
  • 3
    Now one can also use Array.Empty<Role>() which is explicitly an array and hence an IList<T>. In Core it's in fact the same array, with only the type exposed differing.
    – Jon Hanna
    Jan 28, 2017 at 16:47

6 Answers 6

232

I think most postings missed the main point. Even if you use an empty array or empty list, those are objects and they are stored in memory. The Garbage Collector has to take care of them. If you are dealing with a high throughput application, it could be a noticeable impact.

Enumerable.Empty does not create an object per call thus putting less load on the GC.

If the code is in low-throughput location, then it boils down to aesthetic considerations though.

7
  • 27
    And it's also reflecting the intention better. Aug 21, 2016 at 18:13
  • 8
    How does Empty() work if it does not create no object? May 24, 2018 at 5:57
  • 26
    @MohammedNoureldin it return singleton May 24, 2018 at 15:57
  • 3
    Not only does Enumerable.Empty<> return a singleton enumerable, that enumerable also returns a singleton enumerator. Feb 21, 2021 at 21:35
  • 2
    @Lennart I do not think so. The code you provided makes use of Array.Empty<TResult>() which is a function and not a constructor. And this function returns EmptyArray<T>.Value which in its turn use ` public static readonly T[] Value = new T[0];` So singleton used has been changed, but it is still a singleton. Sep 2, 2021 at 23:31
110

I think Enumerable.Empty<T> is better because it is more explicit: your code clearly indicates your intentions. It might also be a bit more efficient, but that's only a secondary advantage.

4
  • 6
    Yes, making it clear that you mean this to be empty vs. something that might be added to later is good for your code.
    – Jay Bazuzi
    Dec 12, 2009 at 17:43
  • 29
    Yes. Enumerable<>.Empty does avoid allocating a new object, which is a small bonus.
    – Neil
    Jan 4, 2010 at 18:38
  • 13
    sidenote @NeilWhitaker: it's Enumerable.Empty<T> not Enumerable<T>.Empty (that one drove me crazy once...)
    – santa
    Apr 11, 2014 at 11:49
  • 1
    Agreed. To add; if you need to initialize an IEnumerable<T>...why initialize it with more firepower than you need. List<T> is a more complex object which implements IEnumerable<T>, among many other things. I say initialize properties in the most basic way possible and use Enumerable.Empty<T>() in this case as well.
    – Craig
    Sep 18, 2015 at 12:22
32

On the performance front, let's see how Enumerable.Empty<T> is implemented.

It returns EmptyEnumerable<T>.Instance, which is defined as:

internal class EmptyEnumerable<T>
{
    public static readonly T[] Instance = new T[0];
}

Static fields on generic types are allocated per generic type parameter. This means that the runtime can lazily create these empty arrays only for the types user code needs, and reuse the instances as many times as needed without adding any pressure on the garbage collector.

To wit:

Debug.Assert(ReferenceEquals(Enumerable.Empty<int>(), Enumerable.Empty<int>()));
2
  • 4
    All this while I thought the implementation was like public static IEnumerable<T> Empty<T>() { yield break; } MS knows it best, probably a cached new T[0] is more efficient.
    – nawfal
    Sep 15, 2018 at 0:34
  • Verified, the implementation is the same in .NET Core 2.2 (just the class names are different).
    – nawfal
    Sep 15, 2018 at 1:28
13

Assuming you actually want to populate the Roles property somehow, then encapsulate that by making it's setter private and initialising it to a new list in the constructor:

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public IList<Role> Roles { get; private set; }

    public Person()
    {
        Roles = new List<Role>();
    }
}

If you really really want to have the public setter, leave Roles with a value of null and avoid the object allocation.

1
  • 1
    I would recommend ICollection over IList
    – CervEd
    Mar 12, 2021 at 7:30
7

The problem with your approach is that you can't add any items to the collection - I would have a private structure like list and then expose the items as an Enumerable:

public class Person
{
    private IList<Role> _roles;

    public Person()
    {
        this._roles = new List<Role>();
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    public void AddRole(Role role)
    {
        //implementation
    }

    public IEnumerable<Role> Roles
    {
        get { return this._roles.AsEnumerable(); }
    }
}

If you intend some other class to create the list of roles (which I wouldn't recommend) then I wouldn't initialise the enumerable at all in Person.

3
  • that's a good point. I would have find that out quickly in my implementation in fact :)
    – Stéphane
    Dec 12, 2009 at 17:38
  • I would make _roles readonly, and I don't see the need for the call to AsEnumerable(). Otherwise, +1 Dec 12, 2009 at 17:56
  • 1
    @Kent - I agree with readonly. As for AsEnumerable, it's not really needed but it prevents Roles being cast to IList and modified.
    – Lee
    Dec 12, 2009 at 18:07
7

The typical problem with exposing the private List as an IEnumerable is that the client of your class can mess with it by casting. This code would work:

  var p = new Person();
  List<Role> roles = p.Roles as List<Role>;
  roles.Add(Role.Admin);

You can avoid this by implementing an iterator:

public IEnumerable<Role> Roles {
  get {
    foreach (var role in mRoles)
      yield return role;
  }
}
5
  • 7
    If a developer casts your IEnumerable<T> to a List<T>, then that's his problem and not yours. If you change the internal implementation in the future (so it's no longer List<T>), it's not your fault that the developer's code breaks. You can't stop people from writing crappy code and abusing your API, so I don't think it's worth spending a lot of effort on. Dec 12, 2009 at 17:52
  • 3
    This is not about breaking code, it is about exploiting code. Dec 12, 2009 at 18:03
  • 2
    I agree with @Hans if it's a security concern, and with @Tommy in all other cases. Naughty developers always make that one fatal mistake.
    – TrueWill
    Apr 15, 2011 at 15:24
  • 1
    And the enumeration part can be writter using the AsEnumerable() extension method. (similar to Lee's answer)
    – Stéphane
    May 12, 2011 at 9:05
  • 1
    @Stephane no, because AsEnumerable() will just give you the List<T> again, so if you're hoping to guarantee it can't be cast back, you've gained nothing.
    – Jon Hanna
    Sep 4, 2015 at 14:33

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