1

I have the following situation:

if 1 < 2:
    print("this line is part of the if statement")

print("this is NOT part of the if statement")

If I use the indent-according-to-mode Emacs command, it indents the second print() as a part of the if statement. Like this:

if 1 < 2:
    print("this line is part of the if statement")

    print("this is NOT part of the if statement")

In my judgment, the indentation of the line should not be changed. Is it possible to "fix" or customize this behaviour?

2
  • 1
    When you think about it, this will save you trouble in the long run since most of your functions and if statements will be longer than one line. Despite it being more annoying to backspace 4 times than tab once, I think the backspacing 4 times is actually a nice way of mentally saying to yourself "okay im ending this block of code here.."
    – Shashank
    Sep 22, 2013 at 5:59
  • You can use tab to cycle indentation level: two tabs are faster than 4 backspaces.
    – abo-abo
    Sep 22, 2013 at 6:49

2 Answers 2

2

I think this is the correct behavior. Because indentation is semantic in python, emacs can't tell what the indentation 'should' be.

If you call indent-according-to-mode emacs sensible interprets this as 'please indent this line to the level of indentation of the previous line above me', and hence the behavior you get is correct. The way to 'turn this off' is to not call the function.

1

IIUC it's possible implementing it like that:

If a statement follows an empty line, preceded by a line, which doesn't open a block, set back indentation to beginning-of-block.

As for python-mode.el, your feature request is welcome at:

https://bugs.launchpad.net/python-mode

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