37

I'm sure this should be simple (probably missing something obvious), but... I have a database string of milliseconds I want to convert into a US-formatted date in Rails. Figured calling .to_date would be my friend, but it's throwing a strange error.

article.date => "1379844601000"

article.date.to_date
NoMethodError: undefined method `div' for nil:NilClass

Can anyone advise the correct way to do this?

0

4 Answers 4

65

Convert it to seconds (milliseconds/1000) and call Time::at on the result:

Time.at(1379844601000/1000)
# => 2013-09-22 12:10:01 +0200

Time::at on ruby-doc.org

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  • 1
    But better to use float 1000.0 if want to include milliseconds part in result.
    – Alexandr
    Jan 21, 2022 at 17:16
54
Time.strptime(milliseconds.to_s, '%Q')
// %Q - Number of milliseconds since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC.
1
  • @zenbro Why Time.strptime(sec, '%Q') return 1 day difference with Date.strptime(sec, '%s') ? Sep 26, 2018 at 14:44
29

Use Date.strptime- but before this, convert it to seconds first:

sec = ('1379844601000'.to_f / 1000).to_s
Date.strptime(sec, '%s')
//Sun, 22 Sep 2013 
1
  • This works great, thanks - is there any way to display it as MM-DD-YYYY instead of DAY, DD MMM YYYY?
    – Nick
    Sep 22, 2013 at 11:33
-1

Time.parse("1379844601000") will give you the date and time

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  • 2
    Is that working for you? It gives me ArgumentError: no time information in "1379844601000". Date.parse gives ArgumentError: invalid date.
    – Nick
    Sep 22, 2013 at 10:56
  • It is working fine for me >> Time.parse("1379844601000") => Sun Sep 22 16:32:36 +0530 2013
    – vigneshre
    Sep 22, 2013 at 11:02
  • 2
    Looks like its a ruby version problem. Ruby 1.9.x versions don't have this parse option. So, you can use Time.strptime() method or use some gems like this github.com/jeremyevans/ruby-american_date
    – vigneshre
    Sep 22, 2013 at 11:12

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