59

In Eclipse I can add a source folder to my android project as a "linked source folder". How do I achieve the same thing in Android Studio?

Or is it possible to add a external folder to build in gradle?

87

in your build.gradle add the following to the end of the android node

android {
    ....
    ....

    sourceSets {
        main.java.srcDirs += 'src/main/<YOUR DIRECTORY>'
    }

}
  • 1
    Really helpful. Why put sourceSets in the scope of android? My dependencies is out of it. – CopperCash Jun 24 '14 at 7:12
  • 3
    But this solution deals only with the Java files. What about all the resources that under 'src' as well - the drawable, layouts, strings, etc. How to be able to put them in an external folder? – GyRo Feb 9 '15 at 10:20
  • For appengine, sourceSets must be at root level - not nested within. Rather strange that it would be one way for android modules and another way for appengine modules. – Tom Apr 24 '15 at 21:48
  • I take it there's no support for the include/exclude options that Eclipse has. Too bad. – Brian White May 26 '15 at 0:08
  • 2
    @Deckard There should be an android block in the build.gradle of the module "app", not in the root build file. – user905686 Jul 25 '16 at 12:04
18

The right answer is:

android {
    ....
    ....

    sourceSets {
        main.java.srcDirs += 'src/main/<YOUR DIRECTORY>'
    }
}

Furthermore, if your external source directory is not under src/main, you could use a relative path like this:

sourceSets {
    main.java.srcDirs += 'src/main/../../../<YOUR DIRECTORY>'
}
  • Regarding relative paths - I wonder if it is possible to use some sort of gradle variables, eg. srcDirs += "$(ProjectDir)/mylib/src"? I'm new to Gradle and have no idea if it supports anything like this. – Tom Apr 24 '15 at 16:46
  • 5
    You can omit the src/main/../../ prefix since the dots cancel the path components. – Brian White May 25 '15 at 20:43
  • @BrianWhite how do I specify a source set on another machine? sourceSets { main.java.srcDirs += 'src/main/\\10.51.70.21\me\myco\apps\myapp\src' } – likejudo Aug 30 '16 at 2:37
  • I don't expect you can since, as far as I know, it just uses the OS open() to access files. You could use something like nfs or smb to mount remote directories right into the file system but that's not specific to Android Studio. – Brian White Aug 31 '16 at 0:09
2

You can add a source folder to the build script and then sync. Look for sourceSets in the documentation here: http://tools.android.com/tech-docs/new-build-system/user-guide#TOC-Basic-Project

I haven't found a good way of adding test source folders. I have manually added the source to the .iml file. Of course this means it will go away everytime the build script is synched.

2

While sourceSets allows you to include entire directory structures, there's no way to exclude parts of it in Android Studio (as of version 1.2), as described here: Android Studio Exclude Class from build?

Until Android Studio gets updated to support include/exclude directives for Android sources, Symlinks work quite well. If you're using Windows, native tools such as junction or mklink can accomplish the equivalent of Un*x symlinks. CygWin can also create these with a little coersion. See: Git Symlinks in Windows and How to make symbolic link with cygwin in Windows 7

  • 5
    Unfortunately, I get the following behaviour in Android Studio 2.1.2 with symlinks: the files are shown next to the project files and with a clean build it works. But every normal build after changes in the symlinked directories gives a gradle error: "Unable to find source java class: '<full-absolute-path>/<added directory>/MyClass.java' because it does not belong to any of the source dirs: [list of src dirs including ".../src/main/java" where in a package folder the symlink resides]". – user905686 Jul 25 '16 at 17:22
  • 4
    @user905686 Yes! Holy cow. It's taken me hours to find somebody else running into this same problem. Like you said, symlinks work on a clean "rebuild" but not on subsequent runs. It's far too time consuming so I've just updated my settings to reference the actual directory instead of symlinking. Kind of a pain but it makes development way faster. – Joshua Pinter Jan 9 '17 at 19:35
  • 1
    I have added bug report issuetracker.google.com/issues/65343978, but I'm not sure if it will be accepted as a bug. – Vojtěch Sázel Sep 4 '17 at 14:30
2

Just in case anyone is interested, heres a complete Java module gradle file that correctly generates and references the built artefacts within an Android multi module application

buildscript {
    repositories {
        maven {
            url "https://plugins.gradle.org/m2/"
        }
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath "net.ltgt.gradle:gradle-apt-plugin:0.15"
    }
}

apply plugin: "net.ltgt.apt"
apply plugin: "java-library"
apply plugin: "idea"

idea {
    module {
        sourceDirs += file("$buildDir/generated/source/apt/main")
        testSourceDirs += file("$buildDir/generated/source/apt/test")
    }
}

dependencies {

    // Dagger 2 and Compiler
    compile "com.google.dagger:dagger:2.15"
    apt "com.google.dagger:dagger-compiler:2.15"
    compile "com.google.guava:guava:24.1-jre"

}

sourceCompatibility = "1.8"
targetCompatibility = "1.8"
0

If you're not using gradle (creating a project from an APK, for instance), this can be done through the Android Studio UI (as of version 3.3.2):

  • Right-click the project root directory, pick Open Module Settings
  • Hit the + Add Content Root button (center right)
  • Add your path and hit OK

In my experience (with native code), as long as your .so's are built with debug symbols and from the same absolute paths, breakpoints added in source files will be automatically recognized.

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