11

My current implementation:

class SomeController extends AppController
{
    function someaction()
    {   
        $d['text'] = "ahoy!";
        $this->render("someactionView", $d);
    }
}

And in AppController:

function render($file, $data = "")
{
    require "views/" . $file . ".php";
}

And the $data will be available in the views file. Is this a correct implementation? Are there any fallacies with this implementation?

1
  • If a Controller is responsible for drawing / requiring HTML (as in your example), then the controller has encroached on the responsibility of the View. If a view can have presentation logic (say, loops for drawing a table), then that logic should be in the view, which could be in a method of a class. Mar 5, 2017 at 2:10

3 Answers 3

13

And the $data will be available in the views file. Is this a correct implementation? Are there any fallacies with this implementation?

Basically you do implement it like the most frameworks do. There's a couple of problems with that:

  • A controller takes an input and sends an output (which breaks the Single-Responsibility Principle)
  • A view is tightly coupled to HTML. Because of this, you cannot re-use the same view for another stuff, like XML, JSON.
  • If you do require "views/" . $file . ".php"; in render() method - you again tighly couple it. What if you change the location of views? Then you would have to slightly rewrite your method. This approach merely kills reuse-ability.

To refresh your basic knowledge:

Controller (also known as Editor)

Serves only singular purpose. It changes model state - that is, it should take an input that comes from $_POST, $_GET, $_FILES, $_COOKIE. In controller only variable assignment should be done and nothing more.

class Controller
{
   public function indexAction()
   {
        $this->view->setVar('age', $this->request->getPostParam('age'));
        $this->view->setVar('user', $this->request->getPostParam('user'));
        //...
   }
}

View

A view has a direct access to a model. In order to make make views more re-usable and maintainable you'd better pass required things as function parameters (or via setters)

class View
{
   public function render($templateFile, array $vars = array())
   {
      ob_start();
      extract($vars);
      require($templateFile);

      return ob_get_clean();
   }
}

How the view should be initialized and how the variables should be passed to it?

First of all - a view should be instantiated outside MVC-triad. Since a controller writes either to view or model - you'd pass variables to view via controller.

$model = new Model();
$view = new View($model);

$controller = new Controller($view);

// This will assign variables to view
$controller->indexAction();

echo $view->render();

Note : In real world scenario, a model isn't a class, but abstraction layer. I call it Model for demonstration purposes.

7
  • 2
    Nice to see some updates here. Can you explain how the view communicates with the model in your example? How is the component called which initializes the view, model, and controller?
    – hek2mgl
    Sep 24, 2013 at 21:21
  • 1
    @hek2mgl 1) A view communicates with a model directly - either via factories/service locators 2) It's called Front Controller. There're several components its made of (Router, Dispatcher, Response sender). The thing is : it manages all requests via single place. You can see its overall implementation in Zend Framework/library/Mvc. As for a good start, I'd recommend this r.je/mvc-in-php.html
    – Yang
    Sep 24, 2013 at 21:57
  • First, currently I'm more a shell script coder. Last time I've code web I had: Router which creates the controller based on request, The controller(presenter, I've learned) then communicates with the model and passes results to the view. The view encapsulates functionality like template rendering, translation, dynamic javascript. I've read about that MVP, that's exactly what I mean. Initialization of model and view where coded in that levels but the presenter was responsible for creation of them
    – hek2mgl
    Sep 24, 2013 at 22:34
  • I still don't see where the view communicates with the model in your example. You just passing $vars from the controller, like me calling assign(). Also you are passing a template name like me. Where is the difference (in your example) ? The difference that I see, is that you are calling render() from the FrontController .. That looks interesting..
    – hek2mgl
    Sep 24, 2013 at 22:37
  • 1
    @DaveJust , it should be $controller = new Controller($model, $view); unless there are several presentations of the same model and in one particular case user has no ability to affect the model layer.
    – tereško
    Sep 26, 2013 at 2:13
3

IMO the render() method belongs to the view and not to the controller. The code should look like this:

Controller:

class SomeController extends AppController
{
    function someaction()
    {   
        $d['text'] = "ahoy!";
        $view = new SomeActionView();
        $view->assign('data', $d);
        echo $view->render();
    }
}

View Base Class:

class View
{

    protected $data;

    function render($template) {
        ob_start();
        // you can access $this->data in template
        require "views/" . $template . ".php";
        $str = ob_get_contents();
        ob_end_clean();
        return $str;
    }


    function assign($key, $val) {
        $this->data[$key] = $val;
    }
}

Extend View class

class SomeActionView extends View
{

    public function render($template = 'someActionTemplate') {
        return parent::render($template);
    }

}
3
  • I think your attempt is wrong but haven't downvoted it. Although some literature suggests that the view can communicate with the model I would not do so. Also I think there are multiple ways to skin a cat.
    – hek2mgl
    Sep 23, 2013 at 2:03
  • Yeah , the "some literature" is made by people like Fowler, Burbeck, Evans and Cunningham. And your literature is made by 37signals.
    – tereško
    Sep 23, 2013 at 2:59
  • I just kept things simple as in the question. Of course template loading will have it's own logic.
    – hek2mgl
    Sep 24, 2013 at 23:54
2

Is this a correct implementation? Are there any fallacies with this implementation?

Short answer: no and several.

First of all, what you have there is no a view. It's just a dumb php template. Views in MVC are instance, that contain the UI logic for the application. They pull information from model layer and, based on information they receive, create a response. This response can be simple text, JSON document, a HTML page assembled from multiple templates or simply a HTTP header.

As for controller, it's only task is to alter the state of model layer and (on rare occasions) the current view. Controllers do not initialize the views nor do the populate templates.

15
  • Then how the view should be initialized and how the variables should be passed to it? Sep 23, 2013 at 1:06
  • I would not confirm to this. If you are not populating the data from the controller to the view, the view isn't independent anymore and you have a strong coupling between the view and the model.
    – hek2mgl
    Sep 23, 2013 at 1:06
  • 2
    @evening , the view would be instantiated outside the controller and passed in as a dependency. And data for view would not be passed in, instead the view would call services from model layer and get all the data that it needs. This also would mean that views are made for specific interface of the model layer.
    – tereško
    Sep 23, 2013 at 1:49
  • @tereško that's a highly questionable design. It can be done but as I said, this gives you a strong coupling between view and model.
    – hek2mgl
    Sep 23, 2013 at 2:08
  • 1
    Please go and read what "tight coupling" actually is and what causes is, because you obviously have no clue what you are talking about.
    – tereško
    Sep 23, 2013 at 3:01

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