3

I am trying to merge two strings of variable length in C. The result should be 1st character from str1 then 1st character from str2 then 2nd character from str1, 2nd character from str2, etc. When it reaches the end of one string it should append the rest of the other string.

For Example:

str1 = "abcdefg";
str2 = "1234";

outputString = "a1b2c3d4efg";

I'm pretty new to C, my first idea was to convert both strings to arrays then try to iterate through the arrays but I thought there might be an easier method. Sample code would be appreciated.

UPDATE: I've tried to implement the answer below. My function looks like the following.

void strMerge(const char *s1, const char *s2, char *output, unsigned int ccDest)
{
    printf("string1 is %s\n", s1);
    printf("string2 is %s\n", s2);

    while (*s1 != '\0' && *s2 != '\0')
    {
        *output++ = *s1++;
        *output++ = *s2++;
    }
    while (*s1 != '\0')
        *output++ = *s1++;
    while (*s2 != '\0')
        *output++ = *s2++;
    *output = '\0';

    printf("merged string is %s\n", *output);
}

But I get a warning when compiling:

$ gcc -g -std=c99 strmerge.c -o strmerge
strmerge2.c: In function ‘strMerge’:
strmerge2.c:41:5: warning: format ‘%s’ expects argument of type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘int’ [-Wformat]

And when I run it it doesnt work:

./strmerge abcdefg 12314135
string1 is abcdefg
string2 is 12314135
merged string is (null)

Why does it think argument 2 is an int and how do I fix it to be a char? If I remove the "*" off output in the printf it doesn't give a compile error but the function still doesn’t work.

  • So what is your actual problem? – Dolda2000 Sep 23 '13 at 1:19
  • A user types in two strings. I need to return a single string that is a merge of the two strings. – tbenz9 Sep 23 '13 at 1:22
  • One of your problems is space management — where is the output going to be placed. With that done, the code is fairly straight-forward. While neither input string is finished, copy a character from each to the output. Once one is finished, you have two more loops to run, one to exhaust the first string and the other to exhaust the second string. Only one of those will be executed (depending on which string is longer), but don't bother trying to find out which it is; there's no need (assuming you write the loops correctly). – Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '13 at 1:43
  • The output is put into a new string and then simply printed using printf. The destination buffer is 128 characters, but the destination string should never be larger than that. – tbenz9 Sep 23 '13 at 1:51
  • 2
    The compilation error is because you should be printing output rather than *output (which is the first character of the string rather than the string itself). Also, output points to the null byte at the end of the string. If you want to print the whole string, you have to preserve the original value of output on entry to the function. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '13 at 5:39
2

Your strMerge prints null because, you print the valueAt(*)output which was assigned null the previous step.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
//strMerge merges two string as per user requirement
void strMerge(const char *s1, const char *s2, char *output)
{
    printf("string1 is %s\n", s1);
    printf("string2 is %s\n", s2);
    while (*s1 != '\0' && *s2 != '\0')
    {
        *output++= *s1++;
    *output++ = *s2++;
    }
    while (*s1 != '\0')
        *output++=*s1++;
    while (*s2 != '\0')
        *output++ = *s2++;
    *output='\0';
}

int main()
{
    char *str1="abcdefg"; 
    char *str2="1234";
    char *output=malloc(strlen(str1)+strlen(str2)+1); //allocate memory 7+4+1 = 12 in this case
    strMerge(str1,str2,output); 
    printf("%s",output);
    return 0;
}
OUTPUT:
   string1 is abcdefg
   string2 is 1234
   a1b2c3d4efg
  • Thank you, I was able to get my code working with a little bit of tweaking all thanks to your simple and concise code. – tbenz9 Sep 23 '13 at 5:52
  • Stylistically, output should be the left-most argument, and the function should return it, just like strcat(). This is done universally in the C std lib so functions returns can stand in for args when calling functions. For example, printf("%s", strMerge(output, str1, str2)); Also, get in the habit of using calloc() instead of malloc(). Like new, calloc() initializes memory, making it unnecessary to add the nul-terminator, and making debugging a lot easier. – user1899861 Jul 19 '14 at 11:10
  • As indicated in my answer below, using & instead of && in the while() test results in 20-45% better performance. – user1899861 Jul 21 '14 at 1:30
3

The code below ensures that the strings can't overflow by making the output string as long as the two input strings, and using fgets() to ensure that there is no overflow of the input strings. One alternative design would do dynamic memory allocation (malloc() et al), at the cost of the calling code having to free() the allocated space. Another design would pass the length of the output buffer to the function so that it could ensure no overflow occurs.

The test program doesn't emit prompts: it would not be hard to add a function to do so.

Code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void interleave_strings(const char *s1, const char *s2, char *output)
{
    while (*s1 != '\0' && *s2 != '\0')
    {
        *output++ = *s1++;
        *output++ = *s2++;
    }
    while (*s1 != '\0')
        *output++ = *s1++;
    while (*s2 != '\0')
        *output++ = *s2++;
    *output = '\0';
}

int main(void)
{
    char line1[100];
    char line2[100];
    char output[200];
    if (fgets(line1, sizeof(line1), stdin) != 0 &&
        fgets(line2, sizeof(line2), stdin) != 0)
    {
        char *end1 = line1 + strlen(line1) - 1;
        char *end2 = line2 + strlen(line2) - 1;
        if (*end1 == '\n')
            *end1 = '\0';
        if (*end2 == '\n')
            *end2 = '\0';
        interleave_strings(line1, line2, output);
        printf("In1: <<%s>>\n", line1);
        printf("In2: <<%s>>\n", line2);
        printf("Out: <<%s>>\n", output);
    }
}

Example output

$ ./interleave
abcdefgh
1234
In1: <<abcdefgh>>
In2: <<1234>>
Out: <<a1b2c3d4efgh>>
$
  • Thank you Jonathan, your example was very helpful, keep up the good work. – tbenz9 Sep 23 '13 at 5:53
  • The two strings contain all the storage, plus 1 byte when considering their two terminators, to hold the resulting merged string. Does anyone know how to do this merge in place? – user1899861 Jul 19 '14 at 11:41
3
char* getMerged(const char* str1, const char* str2) {
  char* str = malloc(strlen(str1)+strlen(str2)+1);
  int k=0,i;
  for(i=0;str1[i] !='\0' && str2[i] !='\0';i++) {
         str[k++] = str1[i];
         str[k++] = str2[i];
  }

  str[k]='\0';
  if (str1[i] != '\0') {
        strcpy(&str[k], &str1[i]); 
  } else if (str2[i] != '\0') {
        strcpy(&str[k], &str2[i]);
  }
 return str; 
}
  • Pretty neat. You could declare the arguments const char * since you don't modify the input strings. Also, since you know where the last character was placed, you could use strcpy() instead of strcat(), without first null terminating the string. Also, you don't want to copy the whole of str1 or str2 onto the string; you didn't allocate enough space for that. Using strcpy() saves rescanning the output which strcat() must do when invoked as you do it: if (str1[i] != '\0') strcpy(&str[k], &str1[i]); else if (str2[i] != '\0') strcpy(&str[k], &str2[i]);. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '13 at 1:46
1

In C, both strings are already arrays that can be accessed by their pointers. You just need to create a new buffer that's large enough, then copy into it.

E.g. something like this:

int str1Length = strlen(str1);
int str2Length = strlen(str2);

char* output = (char*) malloc(str1Length + str2Length + 1);

int j = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < str1Length; i++)
{
    output[j++] = str1[i];
    if (str2Length < i)
        output[j++] = str2[i];
}

if (str2Length > str1Length)
{
    for (int i = str2Length - str1Length; i < str2Length; i++)
    {
        output[j++] = str2[i];
    }
}
  • 1
    Are you sure you're writing C? I know C++ has a new, but it is news to me that it is present in C. MSVC can confuse things by compiling most C code as if it was a C++ compiler...but please rewrite in pure C or delete. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 23 '13 at 1:40
  • Yeah, I tend to look through "C++ tinted glasses". Not a big deal to convert the new to a malloc, and certainly not worth expending downvotes :) – Tawnos Sep 23 '13 at 4:14
  • All those subscripts make for noisy code. The proper replacement for new is calloc(), not malloc(), as calloc() initializes its memory. – user1899861 Jul 19 '14 at 11:37

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