146

I need a utility function that takes in an integer value (ranging from 2 to 5 digits in length) that rounds up to the next multiple of 5 instead of the nearest multiple of 5. Here is what I got:

function round5(x)
{
    return (x % 5) >= 2.5 ? parseInt(x / 5) * 5 + 5 : parseInt(x / 5) * 5;
}

When I run round5(32), it gives me 30, where I want 35.
When I run round5(37), it gives me 35, where I want 40.

When I run round5(132), it gives me 130, where I want 135.
When I run round5(137), it gives me 135, where I want 140.

etc...

How do I do this?

3
  • 3
    Should round5(5) give 5, or 10? – user2357112 supports Monica Sep 23 '13 at 6:59
  • 1
    How about: divide x by 5, round up to the nearest integer (using the Math.ceil function) and then multiply by 5? – Martin Wilson Sep 23 '13 at 7:02
  • 2
    round5(5) should give 5 – Amit Erandole Sep 23 '13 at 7:02
341

This will do the work:

function round5(x)
{
    return Math.ceil(x/5)*5;
}

It's just a variation of the common rounding number to nearest multiple of x function Math.round(number/x)*x, but using .ceil instead of .round makes it always round up instead of down/up according to mathematical rules.

8
  • could you explain a little about how you came to this solution so fast? I thought Math.ceil only rounds up decimals to whole integers. – Amit Erandole Sep 23 '13 at 7:07
  • 2
    Well, it does round up to the whole integer here, @AmitErandole ;) – Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 23 '13 at 7:12
  • 1
    +1 for compact and efficient... and it will round to 10, right? :) – zx81 Jun 9 '14 at 10:19
  • I'd add another parameter to this function, indicating the "rounder", so the original number can be rounded to whatever we set in the function call and not only fixed 5... – TheCuBeMan Oct 22 '14 at 11:27
  • 4
    I love this solution! I implemented it with a closure for conveniently changing the multiple inline as needed: const roundToNearestMultipleOf = m => n => Math.round(n/m)*m Usage: roundToNearestMultipleOf(5)(32) – gfullam Feb 21 '19 at 19:25
22
const roundToNearest5 = x => Math.round(x/5)*5

This will round the number to the nearest 5. To always round up to the nearest 5, use Math.ceil. Likewise, to always round down, use Math.floor instead of Math.round. You can then call this function like you would any other. For example,

roundToNearest5(21)

will return:

20
1
  • +1 because I needed a way to round to the nearest five. (OP asked for rounding to the next five (upwards). Thus, the accepted answer is indeed correct, @Oliver.) – AlexG Jan 21 at 12:36
6

Like this?

function roundup5(x) { return (x%5)?x-x%5+5:x }
1
  • 1
    Thanks for your solution, my unique situation needed a round up that didn't use floating point math but could use modulo. – DoomGoober Jun 7 at 19:39
5

I arrived here while searching for something similar. If my number is —0, —1, —2 it should floor to —0, and if it's —3, —4, —5 it should ceil to —5.

I came up with this solution:

function round(x) { return x%5<3 ? (x%5===0 ? x : Math.floor(x/5)*5) : Math.ceil(x/5)*5 }

And the tests:

for (var x=40; x<51; x++) {
  console.log(x+"=>", x%5<3 ? (x%5===0 ? x : Math.floor(x/5)*5) : Math.ceil(x/5)*5)
}
// 40 => 40
// 41 => 40
// 42 => 40
// 43 => 45
// 44 => 45
// 45 => 45
// 46 => 45
// 47 => 45
// 48 => 50
// 49 => 50
// 50 => 50
1
  • 2
    This can be accomplished more simply by using Math.round – Spencer Stolworthy Jan 16 '20 at 15:43
2
voici 2 solutions possibles :
y= (x % 10==0) ? x : x-x%5 +5; //......... 15 => 20 ; 37 => 40 ;  41 => 45 ; 20 => 20 ; 

z= (x % 5==0) ? x : x-x%5 +5;  //......... 15 => 15 ; 37 => 40 ;  41 => 45 ; 20 => 20 ;

Regards Paul

0

// round with precision

var round = function (value, precision) {
    return Math.round(value * Math.pow(10, precision)) / Math.pow(10, precision);
};

// round to 5 with precision

var round5 = (value, precision) => {
    return round(value * 2, precision) / 2;
}
0
const fn = _num =>{
    return Math.round(_num)+ (5 -(Math.round(_num)%5))
}

reason for using round is that expected input can be a random number.

Thanks!!!

-2
if( x % 5 == 0 ) {
    return int( Math.floor( x / 5 ) ) * 5;
} else {
    return ( int( Math.floor( x / 5 ) ) * 5 ) + 5;
}

maybe?

1
  • ReferenceError: int is not defined. Maybe you wanted parseInt, but this wouldn't be necessary since Math.floor returns a number. – pawel Sep 23 '13 at 7:07

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