53

I'm using cProfile to profile my Python program. Based upon this talk I was under the impression that KCacheGrind could parse and display the output from cProfile.

However, when I go to import the file, KCacheGrind just displays an 'Unknown File Format' error in the status bar and sits there displaying nothing.

Is there something special I need to do before my profiling stats are compatible with KCacheGrind?

...
if profile:
    import cProfile

    profileFileName = 'Profiles/pythonray_' + time.strftime('%Y%m%d_%H%M%S') + '.profile'

    profile = cProfile.Profile()
    profile.run('pilImage = camera.render(scene, samplePattern)')

    profile.dump_stats(profileFileName)
    profile.print_stats()
else:            
    pilImage = camera.render(scene, samplePattern)
...

Package Versions

  • KCacheGrind 4.3.1
  • Python 2.6.2
  • Just curious, can anyone point me to the talk linked here? It seems to be broken. – 0xc0de May 19 '18 at 10:44
89

With cProfile you can also profile existing programs, without making any separate profiling script. Just run program with profiler

python -m cProfile -o profile_data.pyprof script_to_profile.py

and open profile data in kcachegrind with pyprof2calltree, whose -k switch automatically opens data in kcachegrind

pyprof2calltree -i profile_data.pyprof -k

For example profiling whole paster server and webapp would be done like this

python -m cProfile -o pyprof.out `which paster` serve development.ini

pyprof2calltree can be installed with easy_install.

  • 1
    Unrelated to the topic I have to add that for "paster" it's a lot better to use repoze.profiler filter which can write directly cachegrind format and knows how to limit profiling just to webapp code. – Mikael Lepistö Oct 12 '10 at 23:13
  • 5
    Side note: on Debian-based systems, the cleanest way to add any python easy_install module as a package is: sudo apt-get install python-stdeb then pypi-install pyprof2calltree. – chronos Jun 13 '11 at 13:22
  • 7
    On the Mac you can use qcachegrind instead. pip install pyprof2calltree && brew install qcachegrind, then pyprof2calltree -i profile_data.pyprof && qcachegrind profile_data.pyprof.log. – Alexander Ljungberg Jul 31 '13 at 6:46
  • @AlexanderLjungberg, you should add brew install graphviz – Frederic Bazin Sep 19 '14 at 11:42
17

You could use profilestats.profile decorator ($ pip install profilestats) -- a simple wrapper for pyprof2calltree module (rebranding of lsprofcalltree.py):

from profilestats import profile

@profile
def func():
    # do something here

Script can be run as usual. profilestats creates two files: cachegrind.out.profilestats and profilestats.prof in KCachegrind-compatible and cProfile formats correspondingly.

7

It can be done using an external module called lscallproftree

This article explains how: CherryPy - CacheGrind

With my resulting code looking like so:

...
if profile:
    import cProfile
    import lsprofcalltree

    profileFileName = 'Profiles/pythonray_' + time.strftime('%Y%m%d_%H%M%S') + '.profile'

    profile = cProfile.Profile()
    profile.run('pilImage = camera.render(scene, samplePattern)')

    kProfile = lsprofcalltree.KCacheGrind(profile)

    kFile = open (profileFileName, 'w+')
    kProfile.output(kFile)
    kFile.close()

    profile.print_stats()    
else:            
    pilImage = camera.render(scene, samplePattern)
...

If anyone knows a way to do this that doesn't require an external (ie. not shipped with Python) module, I'd still be very interested to hear about it.

6

If what you're actually trying to do is see what parts of your code could be optimized for speed, and you can randomly pause it in the debugger, this method works. It may be surprising, but you don't need very many stackshots.

  • Thanks for that, it's always handy to have multiple tools in my toolbox. My reasons for using a profiler were both to confirm my suspicions about where the time was being taken up, and as a chance to become acquainted with the available tools. I'll probably experiment with both full profiles and stack shots going forward. – Adam Luchjenbroers Dec 16 '09 at 11:03
  • I'm not sure what answer this was meant to be linking to but it looks like the question has been migrated so the anchor's not working any more. – Harley Holcombe Jun 26 '11 at 10:41
  • @Harley: Thanks. Link fixed. – Mike Dunlavey Jun 26 '11 at 11:41
  • Looks like the question has been removed from programmers.stackexchange.com. Care to summarize what the linked answer was about? – akaihola Sep 5 '11 at 10:21
  • @akaihola: Yeah, there's a gremlin lurking. I put in a different link. – Mike Dunlavey Sep 5 '11 at 13:49
5

3 differents ways to profile your code and visualizing results in KCachegrind/Qcachegrind:

I - CPROFILE

1 - Profile myfunc() from ipython

import cProfile
filename = 'filename.prof'
cProfile.run('myfunc()', filename)

2 - Convert your file to a usable kcachegrind file in your shell

sudo pip install pyprof2calltree
pyprof2calltree -i filename.prof -o callgrind.filename.prof

3 - Open callgrind.filename.prof in kcachegrind

II - EMBEDDED CPROFILE

1 - Profile few lines in your code.

import cProfile
filename = 'filename.prof'
pr = cProfile.Profile()
pr.enable()
# ... lines to profile ...
pr.disable()
pr.dump_stats(filename)

2 - Convert your file to a usable kcachegrind file in your shell

sudo pip install pyprof2calltree
pyprof2calltree -i filename.prof -o callgrind.filename.prof

3 - Open callgrind.filename.prof in kcachegrind

III - YAPPI

1 - Profile myfunc() from ipython or from your code

import yappi
filename = 'callgrind.filename.prof'
yappi.set_clock_type('cpu')
yappi.start(builtins=True)
myfunc()
stats = yappi.get_func_stats()
stats.save(filename, type='callgrind')

2 - Open callgrind.filename.prof in kcachegrind

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