90

If I have a column in a table of type TIMESTAMP and has as default: CURRENT_TIMESTAMP does this column get updated to the current timestamp if I update the value of any other column in the the same row?
It seems that it does not but I am not sure if this is what should happen.
I can not understand what this means (from MySQL documentation):

If the column is auto-updated, it is automatically updated to the current timestamp when the value of any other column in the row is changed from its current value. The column remains unchanged if all other columns are set to their current values. To prevent the column from updating when other columns change, explicitly set it to its current value. To update the column even when other columns do not change, explicitly set it to the value it should have]2

1
  • 2
    why haven't you tried this by creating a test table and updating sample data. By the way it doesn't update timestamp typed column in update. If this is not added in column definition ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP Apr 26 '16 at 17:18
151

Give the command SHOW CREATE TABLE whatever

Then look at the table definition.

It probably has a line like this

logtime TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,

in it. DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP means that any INSERT without an explicit time stamp setting uses the current time. Likewise, ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP means that any update without an explicit timestamp results in an update to the current timestamp value.

You can control this default behavior when creating your table.

Or, if the timestamp column wasn't created correctly in the first place, you can change it.

ALTER TABLE whatevertable
     CHANGE whatevercolumn 
            whatevercolumn TIMESTAMP NOT NULL
                           DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP 
                           ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;

This will cause both INSERT and UPDATE operations on the table automatically to update your timestamp column. If you want to update whatevertable without changing the timestamp, that is,

To prevent the column from updating when other columns change

then you need to issue this kind of update.

UPDATE whatevertable
   SET something = 'newvalue',
       whatevercolumn = whatevercolumn
 WHERE someindex = 'indexvalue'

This works with TIMESTAMP and DATETIME columns. (Prior to MySQL version 5.6.5 it only worked with TIMESTAMPs) When you use TIMESTAMPs, time zones are accounted for: on a correctly configured server machine, those values are always stored in UTC and translated to local time upon retrieval.

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    DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP means that any INSERT without an explicit time stamp setting results using the current time. In my case I have the DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP but on UPDATE the column is not updated. So I am not clear what you mean in this sentence
    – Jim
    Sep 23 '13 at 15:48
  • See my edit where I tried to clarify. INSERT and UPDATE default behavior are controlled separately.
    – O. Jones
    Sep 23 '13 at 21:10
  • Yes, both INSERT and UPDATE operations which give the name of the timestamp column will override the default current_timestamp behavior.
    – O. Jones
    Jun 30 '15 at 11:13
  • 1
    Thank you sir. Perfect solution one of my problems
    – Edwinfad
    Dec 4 '17 at 1:52
  • phpMyAdmin says there is an error with SQL query "You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP' at line 1"
    – c0dehunter
    Feb 26 '19 at 7:54
14

I think you have to define the timestamp column like this

CREATE TABLE t1 
(
    ts TIMESTAMP DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
);

See here

1
  • 1
    Mine only has the DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
    – Jim
    Sep 23 '13 at 15:18
6

An auto-updated column is automatically updated to the current timestamp when the value of any other column in the row is changed from its current value. An auto-updated column remains unchanged if all other columns are set to their current values.

To explain it let's imagine you have only one row:

-------------------------------
| price | updated_at          |
-------------------------------
|  2    | 2018-02-26 16:16:17 |
-------------------------------

Now, if you run the following update column:

 update my_table
 set price = 2

it will not change the value of updated_at, since price value wasn't actually changed (it was already 2).

But if you have another row with price value other than 2, then the updated_at value of that row (with price <> 3) will be updated to CURRENT_TIMESTAMP.

2
  • Confirmed behavior as described in MySQL. Furthermore, it does not count as an INSERT if no values changed, so a PHP call like $this->pdo->lastInsertId() returns 0 (for no insert) instead of the id for the row that contains the data that stayed the same.
    – OXiGEN
    Aug 7 '19 at 8:44
  • @OXiGEN - UPDATE is not INSERT, so I would not expect lastInsertId to contain a value - regardless of whether any column changes or not. lastInsertId is generally only used when INSERT a new row having an auto-increment ID column (to find out what ID was assigned); not when altering existing rows. Aug 29 '20 at 18:55
3

Add a trigger in database:

DELIMITER //
CREATE TRIGGER update_user_password 
  BEFORE UPDATE ON users
  FOR EACH ROW
    BEGIN
      IF OLD.password <> NEW.password THEN
        SET NEW.password_changed_on = NOW();
      END IF;
    END //
DELIMITER ;

The password changed time will update only when password column is changed.

2

Adding where to find UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP because for new people this is a confusion.

Most people will use phpmyadmin or something like it.

Default value you select CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

Attributes (a different drop down) you select UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

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