89

During recent discussions at work, someone referred to a trampoline function.

I have read the description at Wikipedia. It is enough to give a general idea of the functionality, but I would like something a bit more concrete.

Do you have a simple snippet of code that would illustrate a trampoline?

  • 2
    In the Microsoft world, trampolines are usually called 'thunks'. [Here's a page][1] from Andrei Alexandrescu's "Modern C++ Design" ---- [1]:books.google.com/… – Michael Burr Oct 10 '08 at 1:02
  • 1
    Related – bobobobo Oct 12 '10 at 12:26
  • It's basicall the generalized form of some functionality you could implement with setjmp/lomgjmp, namely to avoid stack ovwerflow. – Ingo Jul 11 '13 at 15:51
  • 11
    why would anyone want to avoid stackoverflow? – Nikole Jun 19 '16 at 15:30
66

There is also the LISP sense of 'trampoline' as described on Wikipedia:

Used in some LISP implementations, a trampoline is a loop that iteratively invokes thunk-returning functions. A single trampoline is sufficient to express all control transfers of a program; a program so expressed is trampolined or in "trampolined style"; converting a program to trampolined style is trampolining. Trampolined functions can be used to implement tail recursive function calls in stack-oriented languages

Let us say we are using Javascript and want to write the naive Fibonacci function in continuation-passing-style. The reason we would do this is not relevant - to port Scheme to JS for instance, or to play with CPS which we have to use anyway to call server-side functions.

So, the first attempt is

function fibcps(n, c) {
    if (n <= 1) {
        c(n);
    } else {
        fibcps(n - 1, function (x) {
            fibcps(n - 2, function (y) {
                c(x + y)
            })
        });
    }
}

But, running this with n = 25 in Firefox gives an error 'Too much recursion!'. Now this is exactly the problem (missing tail-call optimization in Javascript) that trampolining solves. Instead of making a (recursive) call to a function, let us return an instruction (thunk) to call that function, to be interpreted in a loop.

function fibt(n, c) {
    function trampoline(x) {
        while (x && x.func) {
            x = x.func.apply(null, x.args);
        }
    }

    function fibtramp(n, c) {
        if (n <= 1) {
            return {func: c, args: [n]};
        } else {
            return {
                func: fibtramp,
                args: [n - 1,
                    function (x) {
                        return {
                            func: fibtramp,
                            args: [n - 2, function (y) {
                                return {func: c, args: [x + y]}
                            }]
                        }
                    }
                ]
            }
        }
    }

    trampoline({func: fibtramp, args: [n, c]});
}
37

Let me add few examples for factorial function implemented with trampolines, in different languages:

Scala:

sealed trait Bounce[A]
case class Done[A](result: A) extends Bounce[A]
case class Call[A](thunk: () => Bounce[A]) extends Bounce[A]

def trampoline[A](bounce: Bounce[A]): A = bounce match {
  case Call(thunk) => trampoline(thunk())
  case Done(x) => x
}

def factorial(n: Int, product: BigInt): Bounce[BigInt] = {
    if (n <= 2) Done(product)
    else Call(() => factorial(n - 1, n * product))
}

object Factorial extends Application {
    println(trampoline(factorial(100000, 1)))
}

Java:

import java.math.BigInteger;

class Trampoline<T> 
{
    public T get() { return null; }
    public Trampoline<T>  run() { return null; }

    T execute() {
        Trampoline<T>  trampoline = this;

        while (trampoline.get() == null) {
            trampoline = trampoline.run();
        }

        return trampoline.get();
    }
}

public class Factorial
{
    public static Trampoline<BigInteger> factorial(final int n, final BigInteger product)
    {
        if(n <= 1) {
            return new Trampoline<BigInteger>() { public BigInteger get() { return product; } };
        }   
        else {
            return new Trampoline<BigInteger>() { 
                public Trampoline<BigInteger> run() { 
                    return factorial(n - 1, product.multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(n)));
                } 
            };
        }
    }

    public static void main( String [ ] args )
    {
        System.out.println(factorial(100000, BigInteger.ONE).execute());
    }
}

C (unlucky without big numbers implementation):

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct _trampoline_data {
  void(*callback)(struct _trampoline_data*);
  void* parameters;
} trampoline_data;

void trampoline(trampoline_data* data) {
  while(data->callback != NULL)
    data->callback(data);
}

//-----------------------------------------

typedef struct _factorialParameters {
  int n;
  int product;
} factorialParameters;

void factorial(trampoline_data* data) {
  factorialParameters* parameters = (factorialParameters*) data->parameters;

  if (parameters->n <= 1) {
    data->callback = NULL;
  }
  else {
    parameters->product *= parameters->n;
    parameters->n--;
  }
}

int main() {
  factorialParameters params = {5, 1};
  trampoline_data t = {&factorial, &params};

  trampoline(&t);
  printf("\n%d\n", params.product);

  return 0;
}
  • Your explanation, especially the C example, as well as ephemient's answer below about nested functions finally made me understand trampolines. A sort of helper function that can be used to update state much like a closure. – Byte Sep 10 '18 at 23:55
  • Scala code should be corrected to if (n < 2) Done(product), SO didn't permit me to edit 1 symbol... – Max Sep 29 at 6:50
20

I'll give you an example that I used in an anti-cheat patch for an online game.

I needed to be able to scan all files that were being loaded by the game for modification. So the most robust way I found to do this was to use a trampoline for CreateFileA. So when the game was launched I would find the address for CreateFileA using GetProcAddress, then I would modify the first few bytes of the function and insert assembly code that would jump to my own "trampoline" function, where I would do some things, and then I would jump back to the next location in CreateFile after my jmp code. To be able to do it reliably is a little trickier than that, but the basic concept is just to hook one function, force it to redirect to another function, and then jump back to the original function.

Edit: Microsoft has a framework for this type of thing that you can look at. Called Detours

7

Here's an example of nested functions:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
/* sort an array, starting at address `base`,
 * containing `nmemb` members, separated by `size`,
 * comparing on the first `nbytes` only. */
void sort_bytes(void *base,  size_t nmemb, size_t size, size_t nbytes) {
    int compar(const void *a, const void *b) {
        return memcmp(a, b, nbytes);
    }
    qsort(base, nmemb, size, compar);
}

compar can't be an external function, because it uses nbytes, which only exists during the sort_bytes call. On some architectures, a small stub function -- the trampoline -- is generated at runtime, and contains the stack location of the current invocation of sort_bytes. When called, it jumps to the compar code, passing that address.

This mess isn't required on architectures like PowerPC, where the ABI specifies that a function pointer is actually a "fat pointer", a structure containing both a pointer to the executable code and another pointer to data. However, on x86, a function pointer is just a pointer.

7

I am currently experimenting with ways to implement tail call optimization for a Scheme interpreter, and so at the moment I am trying to figure out whether the trampoline would be feasible for me.

As I understand it, it is basically just a series of function calls performed by a trampoline function. Each function is called a thunk and returns the next step in the computation until the program terminates (empty continuation).

Here is the first piece of code that I wrote to improve my understanding of the trampoline:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef void *(*CONTINUATION)(int);

void trampoline(CONTINUATION cont)
{
  int counter = 0;
  CONTINUATION currentCont = cont;
  while (currentCont != NULL) {
    currentCont = (CONTINUATION) currentCont(counter);
    counter++;
  }
  printf("got off the trampoline - happy happy joy joy !\n");
}

void *thunk3(int param)
{
  printf("*boing* last thunk\n");
  return NULL;
}

void *thunk2(int param)
{
  printf("*boing* thunk 2\n");
  return thunk3;
}

void *thunk1(int param)
{
  printf("*boing* thunk 1\n");
  return thunk2;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  trampoline(thunk1);
}

results in:

meincompi $ ./trampoline 
*boing* thunk 1
*boing* thunk 2
*boing* last thunk
got off the trampoline - happy happy joy joy !
0

For C, a trampoline would be a function pointer:

size_t (*trampoline_example)(const char *, const char *);
trampoline_example= strcspn;
size_t result_1= trampoline_example("xyzbxz", "abc");

trampoline_example= strspn;
size_t result_2= trampoline_example("xyzbxz", "abc");

Edit: More esoteric trampolines would be implicitly generated by the compiler. One such use would be a jump table. (Although there are clearly more complicated ones the farther down you start attempting to generate complicated code.)

0

Now that C# has Local Functions, the Bowling Game coding kata can be elegantly solved with a trampoline:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

class Game
{
    internal static int RollMany(params int[] rs) 
    {
        return Trampoline(1, 0, rs.ToList());

        int Trampoline(int frame, int rsf, IEnumerable<int> rs) =>
              frame == 11             ? rsf
            : rs.Count() == 0         ? rsf
            : rs.First() == 10        ? Trampoline(frame + 1, rsf + rs.Take(3).Sum(), rs.Skip(1))
            : rs.Take(2).Sum() == 10  ? Trampoline(frame + 1, rsf + rs.Take(3).Sum(), rs.Skip(2))
            :                           Trampoline(frame + 1, rsf + rs.Take(2).Sum(), rs.Skip(2));
    }
}

The method Game.RollMany is called with a number of rolls: typically 20 rolls if there are no spares or strikes.

The first line immediately calls the trampoline function: return Trampoline(1, 0, rs.ToList());. This local function recursively traverses the rolls array. The local function (the trampoline) allows the traversal to start with two additional values: start with frame 1 and the rsf (result so far) 0.

Within the local function there is ternary operator that handles five cases:

  • Game ends at frame 11: return the result so far
  • Game ends if there are no more rolls: return the result so far
  • Strike: calculate the frame score and continue traversal
  • Spare: calculate the frame score and continue traversal
  • Normal score: calculate the frame score and continue traversal

Continuing the traversal is done by calling the trampoline again, but now with updated values.

For more information, search for: "tail recursion accumulator". Keep in mind that the compiler does not optimize tail recursion. So as elegant as this solution may be, it will likely not be the fasted.

-2
typedef void* (*state_type)(void);
void* state1();
void* state2();
void* state1() {
  return state2;
}
void* state2() {
  return state1;
}
// ...
state_type state = state1;
while (1) {
  state = state();
}
// ...
  • 3
    can you add any comments or explanation of why this is a trampoline? – prasun Nov 8 '15 at 4:45

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