79

I'm trying to fix my SendGridPlus library to deal with SendGrid events, but I'm having some trouble with the inconsistent treatment of categories in the API.

In the following example payload taken from the SendGrid API reference, you'll notice that the category property for each item can either be a single string or an array of strings.

[
  {
    "email": "john.doe@sendgrid.com",
    "timestamp": 1337966815,
    "category": [
      "newuser",
      "transactional"
    ],
    "event": "open"
  },
  {
    "email": "jane.doe@sendgrid.com",
    "timestamp": 1337966815,
    "category": "olduser",
    "event": "open"
  }
]

It seems my options to make JSON.NET like this are fixing the string before it comes in, or configuring JSON.NET to accept the incorrect data. I'd rather not do any string parsing if I can get away with it.

Is there any other way I can handle this using Json.Net?

158

The best way to handle this situation is to use a custom JsonConverter.

Before we get to the converter, we'll need to define a class to deserialize the data into. For the Categories property that can vary between a single item and an array, define it as a List<string> and mark it with a [JsonConverter] attribute so that JSON.Net will know to use the custom converter for that property. I would also recommend using [JsonProperty] attributes so that the member properties can be given meaningful names independent of what is defined in the JSON.

class Item
{
    [JsonProperty("email")]
    public string Email { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty("timestamp")]
    public int Timestamp { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty("event")]
    public string Event { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty("category")]
    [JsonConverter(typeof(SingleOrArrayConverter<string>))]
    public List<string> Categories { get; set; }
}

Here is how I would implement the converter. Notice I've made the converter generic so that it can be used with strings or other types of objects as needed.

class SingleOrArrayConverter<T> : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return (objectType == typeof(List<T>));
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        JToken token = JToken.Load(reader);
        if (token.Type == JTokenType.Array)
        {
            return token.ToObject<List<T>>();
        }
        return new List<T> { token.ToObject<T>() };
    }

    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Here is an short program demonstrating the converter in action with your sample data:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string json = @"
        [
          {
            ""email"": ""john.doe@sendgrid.com"",
            ""timestamp"": 1337966815,
            ""category"": [
              ""newuser"",
              ""transactional""
            ],
            ""event"": ""open""
          },
          {
            ""email"": ""jane.doe@sendgrid.com"",
            ""timestamp"": 1337966815,
            ""category"": ""olduser"",
            ""event"": ""open""
          }
        ]";

        List<Item> list = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<Item>>(json);

        foreach (Item obj in list)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("email: " + obj.Email);
            Console.WriteLine("timestamp: " + obj.Timestamp);
            Console.WriteLine("event: " + obj.Event);
            Console.WriteLine("categories: " + string.Join(", ", obj.Categories));
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
    }
}

And finally, here is the output of the above:

email: john.doe@sendgrid.com
timestamp: 1337966815
event: open
categories: newuser, transactional

email: jane.doe@sendgrid.com
timestamp: 1337966815
event: open
categories: olduser

Fiddle: https://dotnetfiddle.net/lERrmu

EDIT

If you need to go the other way, i.e. serialize, while keeping the same format, you can implement the WriteJson() method of the converter as shown below. (Be sure to remove the CanWrite override or change it to return true, or else WriteJson() will never be called.)

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        List<T> list = (List<T>)value;
        if (list.Count == 1)
        {
            value = list[0];
        }
        serializer.Serialize(writer, value);
    }

Fiddle: https://dotnetfiddle.net/XG3eRy

  • 4
    Perfect! You're the man. Fortunately, I had already done all of the other stuff about using JsonProperty to make the properties more meaningful. Thank you for an amazingly complete answer. :) – Robert McLaws Sep 25 '13 at 14:18
  • No problem; glad you found it helpful. – Brian Rogers Sep 25 '13 at 14:50
  • 4
    You definitely are the man. – Sachin Kainth Mar 20 '15 at 16:20
  • 1
    Excellent! This is what ive been looking for. @BrianRogers, if you are ever in Amsterdam, drinks are on me! – Kay Nelson Apr 9 '15 at 13:31
  • 2
    @israelaltar You don't need to add the converter to the DeserializeObject call if you use the [JsonConverter] attribute on the list property in your class, as shown in the answer above. If you don't use the attribute, then, yes, you would need to pass the converter to DeserializeObject. – Brian Rogers Jul 3 '17 at 13:44
5

I was working on this for ages, and thanks to Brian for his answer. All I am adding is the vb.net answer!:

Public Class SingleValueArrayConverter(Of T)
sometimes-array-and-sometimes-object
    Inherits JsonConverter
    Public Overrides Sub WriteJson(writer As JsonWriter, value As Object, serializer As JsonSerializer)
        Throw New NotImplementedException()
    End Sub

    Public Overrides Function ReadJson(reader As JsonReader, objectType As Type, existingValue As Object, serializer As JsonSerializer) As Object
        Dim retVal As Object = New [Object]()
        If reader.TokenType = JsonToken.StartObject Then
            Dim instance As T = DirectCast(serializer.Deserialize(reader, GetType(T)), T)
            retVal = New List(Of T)() From { _
                instance _
            }
        ElseIf reader.TokenType = JsonToken.StartArray Then
            retVal = serializer.Deserialize(reader, objectType)
        End If
        Return retVal
    End Function
    Public Overrides Function CanConvert(objectType As Type) As Boolean
        Return False
    End Function
End Class

then in your class:

 <JsonProperty(PropertyName:="JsonName)> _
 <JsonConverter(GetType(SingleValueArrayConverter(Of YourObject)))> _
    Public Property YourLocalName As List(Of YourObject)

Hope this saves you some time

  • Typos: <JsonConverter(GetType(SingleValueArrayConverter(Of YourObject)))> _ Public Property YourLocalName As List(Of YourObject) – GlennG Mar 11 '16 at 15:33
3

As a minor variation to the great answer by Brian Rogers, here are two tweaked versions of SingleOrArrayConverter<T>.

Firstly, here is a version that works for all List<T> for every type T that is not itself a collection:

public class SingleOrArrayListConverter : JsonConverter
{
    // Adapted from this answer https://stackoverflow.com/a/18997172
    // to https://stackoverflow.com/questions/18994685/how-to-handle-both-a-single-item-and-an-array-for-the-same-property-using-json-n
    // by Brian Rogers https://stackoverflow.com/users/10263/brian-rogers
    readonly bool canWrite;
    readonly IContractResolver resolver;

    public SingleOrArrayListConverter() : this(false) { }

    public SingleOrArrayListConverter(bool canWrite) : this(canWrite, null) { }

    public SingleOrArrayListConverter(bool canWrite, IContractResolver resolver)
    {
        this.canWrite = canWrite;
        // Use the global default resolver if none is passed in.
        this.resolver = resolver ?? new JsonSerializer().ContractResolver;
    }

    static bool CanConvert(Type objectType, IContractResolver resolver)
    {
        Type itemType;
        JsonArrayContract contract;
        return CanConvert(objectType, resolver, out itemType, out contract);
    }

    static bool CanConvert(Type objectType, IContractResolver resolver, out Type itemType, out JsonArrayContract contract)
    {
        if ((itemType = objectType.GetListItemType()) == null)
        {
            itemType = null;
            contract = null;
            return false;
        }
        // Ensure that [JsonObject] is not applied to the type.
        if ((contract = resolver.ResolveContract(objectType) as JsonArrayContract) == null)
            return false;
        var itemContract = resolver.ResolveContract(itemType);
        // Not implemented for jagged arrays.
        if (itemContract is JsonArrayContract)
            return false;
        return true;
    }

    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType) { return CanConvert(objectType, resolver); }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        Type itemType;
        JsonArrayContract contract;

        if (!CanConvert(objectType, serializer.ContractResolver, out itemType, out contract))
            throw new JsonSerializationException(string.Format("Invalid type for {0}: {1}", GetType(), objectType));
        if (reader.MoveToContent().TokenType == JsonToken.Null)
            return null;
        var list = (IList)(existingValue ?? contract.DefaultCreator());
        if (reader.TokenType == JsonToken.StartArray)
            serializer.Populate(reader, list);
        else
            // Here we take advantage of the fact that List<T> implements IList to avoid having to use reflection to call the generic Add<T> method.
            list.Add(serializer.Deserialize(reader, itemType));
        return list;
    }

    public override bool CanWrite { get { return canWrite; } }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        var list = value as ICollection;
        if (list == null)
            throw new JsonSerializationException(string.Format("Invalid type for {0}: {1}", GetType(), value.GetType()));
        // Here we take advantage of the fact that List<T> implements IList to avoid having to use reflection to call the generic Count method.
        if (list.Count == 1)
        {
            foreach (var item in list)
            {
                serializer.Serialize(writer, item);
                break;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            writer.WriteStartArray();
            foreach (var item in list)
                serializer.Serialize(writer, item);
            writer.WriteEndArray();
        }
    }
}

public static partial class JsonExtensions
{
    public static JsonReader MoveToContent(this JsonReader reader)
    {
        while ((reader.TokenType == JsonToken.Comment || reader.TokenType == JsonToken.None) && reader.Read())
            ;
        return reader;
    }

    internal static Type GetListItemType(this Type type)
    {
        // Quick reject for performance
        if (type.IsPrimitive || type.IsArray || type == typeof(string))
            return null;
        while (type != null)
        {
            if (type.IsGenericType)
            {
                var genType = type.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
                if (genType == typeof(List<>))
                    return type.GetGenericArguments()[0];
            }
            type = type.BaseType;
        }
        return null;
    }
}

It can be used as follows:

var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings
{
    // Pass true if you want single-item lists to be reserialized as single items
    Converters = { new SingleOrArrayListConverter(true) },
};
var list = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<Item>>(json, settings);

Notes:

  • The converter avoids the need to pre-load the entire JSON value into memory as a JToken hierarchy.

  • The converter does not apply to lists whose items are also serialized as collections, e.g. List<string []>

  • The Boolean canWrite argument passed to the constructor controls whether to re-serialize single-element lists as JSON values or as JSON arrays.

  • The converter's ReadJson() uses the existingValue if pre-allocated so as to support populating of get-only list members.

Secondly, here is a version that works with other generic collections such as ObservableCollection<T>:

public class SingleOrArrayCollectionConverter<TCollection, TItem> : JsonConverter
    where TCollection : ICollection<TItem>
{
    // Adapted from this answer https://stackoverflow.com/a/18997172
    // to https://stackoverflow.com/questions/18994685/how-to-handle-both-a-single-item-and-an-array-for-the-same-property-using-json-n
    // by Brian Rogers https://stackoverflow.com/users/10263/brian-rogers
    readonly bool canWrite;

    public SingleOrArrayCollectionConverter() : this(false) { }

    public SingleOrArrayCollectionConverter(bool canWrite) { this.canWrite = canWrite; }

    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return typeof(TCollection).IsAssignableFrom(objectType);
    }

    static void ValidateItemContract(IContractResolver resolver)
    {
        var itemContract = resolver.ResolveContract(typeof(TItem));
        if (itemContract is JsonArrayContract)
            throw new JsonSerializationException(string.Format("Item contract type {0} not supported.", itemContract));
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        ValidateItemContract(serializer.ContractResolver);
        if (reader.MoveToContent().TokenType == JsonToken.Null)
            return null;
        var list = (ICollection<TItem>)(existingValue ?? serializer.ContractResolver.ResolveContract(objectType).DefaultCreator());
        if (reader.TokenType == JsonToken.StartArray)
            serializer.Populate(reader, list);
        else
            list.Add(serializer.Deserialize<TItem>(reader));
        return list;
    }

    public override bool CanWrite { get { return canWrite; } }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        ValidateItemContract(serializer.ContractResolver);
        var list = value as ICollection<TItem>;
        if (list == null)
            throw new JsonSerializationException(string.Format("Invalid type for {0}: {1}", GetType(), value.GetType()));
        if (list.Count == 1)
        {
            foreach (var item in list)
            {
                serializer.Serialize(writer, item);
                break;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            writer.WriteStartArray();
            foreach (var item in list)
                serializer.Serialize(writer, item);
            writer.WriteEndArray();
        }
    }
}

Then, if your model is using, say, an ObservableCollection<T> for some T, you could apply it as follows:

class Item
{
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public int Timestamp { get; set; }
    public string Event { get; set; }

    [JsonConverter(typeof(SingleOrArrayCollectionConverter<ObservableCollection<string>, string>))]
    public ObservableCollection<string> Category { get; set; }
}

Notes:

  • In addition to the notes and restrictions for SingleOrArrayListConverter, the TCollection type must be read/write and have a parameterless constructor.

Demo fiddle with basic unit tests here.

0

I had a very similar Problem. My Json Request was completly unknown for me. I only knew.

There will be an objectId in it and some anonym key value pairs AND arrays.

I used it for an EAV Model i did:

My JSON Request:

{objectId": 2, "firstName": "Hans", "email" :[ "a@b.de","a@c.de"], "name": "Andre", "something" :["232","123"] }

My Class i defined:

[JsonConverter(typeof(AnonyObjectConverter))]
public class AnonymObject
{
    public AnonymObject()
    {
        fields = new Dictionary<string, string>();
        list = new List<string>();
    }

    public string objectid { get; set; }
    public Dictionary<string, string> fields { get; set; }
    public List<string> list { get; set; }
}

and now that i want to deserialize unknown attributes with its value and arrays in it my Converter looks like that:

   public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        AnonymObject anonym = existingValue as AnonymObject ?? new AnonymObject();
        bool isList = false;
        StringBuilder listValues = new StringBuilder();

        while (reader.Read())
        {
            if (reader.TokenType == JsonToken.EndObject) continue;

            if (isList)
            {
                while (reader.TokenType != JsonToken.EndArray)
                {
                    listValues.Append(reader.Value.ToString() + ", ");

                    reader.Read();
                }
                anonym.list.Add(listValues.ToString());
                isList = false;

                continue;
            }

            var value = reader.Value.ToString();

            switch (value.ToLower())
            {
                case "objectid":
                    anonym.objectid = reader.ReadAsString();
                    break;
                default:
                    string val;

                    reader.Read();
                    if(reader.TokenType == JsonToken.StartArray)
                    {
                        isList = true;
                        val = "ValueDummyForEAV";
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        val = reader.Value.ToString();
                    }
                    try
                    {
                        anonym.fields.Add(value, val);
                    }
                    catch(ArgumentException e)
                    {
                        throw new ArgumentException("Multiple Attribute found");
                    }
                    break;
            }

        }

        return anonym;
    }

So now everytime i get an AnonymObject i can iterate through the Dictionary and everytime there is my Flag "ValueDummyForEAV" i switch to the list, read the first line and split the values. After that i delete the first entry from the list and go on with iteration from the Dictionary.

Maybe someone has the same problem and can use this :)

Regards Andre

0

You can use a JSONConverterAttribute as found here: http://james.newtonking.com/projects/json/help/

Presuming you have a class that looks like

public class RootObject
{
    public string email { get; set; }
    public int timestamp { get; set; }
    public string smtpid { get; set; }
    public string @event { get; set; }
    public string category[] { get; set; }
}

You'd decorate the category property as seen here:

    [JsonConverter(typeof(SendGridCategoryConverter))]
    public string category { get; set; }

public class SendGridCategoryConverter : JsonConverter
{
  public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
  {
    return true; // add your own logic
  }

  public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
  {
   // do work here to handle returning the array regardless of the number of objects in 
  }

  public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
  {
    // Left as an exercise to the reader :)
    throw new NotImplementedException();
  }
}
  • Thanks for this, but it still doesn't fix the problem. When an actual array comes in, it still throws an error before my code can even execute for an object that has an actual array. 'Additional information: Unexpected token when deserializing object: String. Path '[2].category[0]', line 17, position 27.' – Robert McLaws Sep 25 '13 at 3:32
  • private string payload = "[\n" + "{\n" + "\"email\": \"john.doe@sendgrid.com\",\n" + "\"timestamp\": 1337966815,\n" + "\"smtp-id\": \"<4FBFC0DD.5040601@sendgrid.com>\",\n" + "\"category\": \"newuser\",\n" + "\"event\": \"clicked\"\n" + "}, " + "{"+ "\"email\": \"john.doe@sendgrid.com\",\n" + "\"timestamp\": 1337969592,\n" + "\"smtp-id\": \"<20120525181309.C1A9B40405B3@Example-Mac.local>\",\n" + "\"category\": [\"somestring1\",\"somestring2\"],\n" + "\"event\": \"processed\",\n" + "}\n" + "]"; – Robert McLaws Sep 25 '13 at 3:34
  • It processed the first object fine and dealt with no array beautifully. But when I created an array for the 2nd object, it failed. – Robert McLaws Sep 25 '13 at 3:35
  • @AdvancedREI Without seeing your code I would guess that you are leaving the reader incorrectly positioned after you read the JSON. Instead of trying to use the reader directly, it is better to load a JToken object from the reader and go from there. See my answer for a working implementation of the converter. – Brian Rogers Sep 25 '13 at 12:05
  • Much better detail in Brian's answer. Use that one :) – Tim Gabrhel Sep 25 '13 at 13:26
-2

I found another solution that can handle the category as string or array by using object. This way I don´t need to mess up with the json serializer.

Please give it a look if you have the time and tell me what you think. https://github.com/MarcelloCarreira/sendgrid-csharp-eventwebhook

It´s based on the solution at https://sendgrid.com/blog/tracking-email-using-azure-sendgrid-event-webhook-part-1/ but I also added date conversion from timestamp, upgraded the variables to reflect current SendGrid model (and made categories work).

I also created a handler with basic auth as option. See the ashx files and the examples.

Thank you!

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