10

Recent I read some C++ code using extensively following getInstance() method:

class S
{
    private:
        int some_int = 0;
    public:
        static S& getInstance()
        {
            static S instance; / (*) /
            return instance;
        }
};

From how this code fragment being used, I learned the getInstance() works like return this, returning the address(or ref) of the instance of class S. But I got confused.

1) where does the static variable S defined in line(*) allocated in memory? And why it can work like return this?

2) what if there exist more than one instance of class S, whose reference will be returned?

8

This is the so-called Singleton design pattern. Its distinguishing feature is that there can only ever be exactly one instance of that class and the pattern ensures that. The class has a private constructor and a statically-created instance that is returned with the getInstance method. You cannot create an instance from the outside and thus get the object only through said method.

Since instance is static in the getInstance method it will retain its value between multiple invocations. It is allocated and constructed somewhen before it's first used. E.g. in this answer it seems like GCC initializes the static variable at the time the function is first used. This answer has some excerpts from the C++ standard related to that.

1
  • thanks. Very helpful. The combination of private constructor and static instance virable is the key. – qweruiop Sep 27 '13 at 4:35
2

Static variable with a function scope is allocated first time the function is called. The compiler keeps track of the fact that is is initialized the first time and avoids further creation during the next visit to the function. This property would be ideal to implement a singleton pattern since this ensures we just maintain a single copy of object. In addition newer compilers makes sure this allocation is also thread safe giving a bonus thread safe singleton implementation without using any dynamic memory allocation. [As pointed out in comments, it is c++11 standard which guarantees the thread safety so do your check about thread safety if you are using a different compiler]

1) where does the static variable S defined in line(*) allocated in memory? And why it can work like return this?

There is specific regions in memory where static variables are stored, like heap for dynamically allocated variables and stack for the typical compile time defined variables. It could vary with compilers but for GCC there are specific sections called DATA and BSS segments with in the executable generated by the compiler where initialized and uninitialized static variables are stored.

2) what if there exist more than one instance of class S, whose reference will be returned?

As mentioned on the top, since it is a static variable the compiler ensures there can only be one instance created the first time function is visited. Also since it has the scope with in the function it cannot clash with any other instances existing else where and getInstance ensures you see the same single instance.

1
  • You're wrong (or at least misleading) about the thread-safe part, it's not new compilers that make it thread safe, it's the C++11 standard (and obviously only more recent compiler versions support that one). An extremely recent compiler that's compiling in C++03 mode is still allowed to compile this non-thread-safe. – KillianDS Sep 25 '13 at 6:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.