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I am currently in the process of writing a C++ Monty Hall Problem Simulation and have run into some trouble. The error I keep getting is:

source.cpp(23): error C4700: uninitialized local variable 'doorReveal' used
source.cpp(25): error C4700: uninitialized local variable 'doorSwitch' used
source.cpp(52): error C4700: uninitialized local variable 'stayWin' used
source.cpp(56): error C4700: uninitialized local variable 'switchWin' used

I can't seem to figure out what is wrong. The project is supposed to simulate the wins by first staying with the original door choice on the first 100 tries and then switching when door is revealed on the next 100 tries. Thank you all for your help in advance.

 #include <iostream>
 #include <time.h>
 using namespace std;

 int main()
 {
     int doorChoice;
     int prizeDoor;
     int doorReveal;
     int doorSwitch;
     int count;
     int switchWin;
     int stayWin;

     srand((unsigned int) time(0));

     for (count = 0; count <= 200; count++)
     {
         prizeDoor = (rand() % 3) + 1;
         doorChoice = (rand() % 3) + 1;
         cout << "The prize door is door number " << prizeDoor << " ." << endl;
         cout << "The door the contestant chose was door " << doorChoice << endl;
         doorReveal != prizeDoor || doorChoice;
         cout << "The host revealed door number " << doorReveal << " ." << endl;
         doorSwitch != doorChoice || doorReveal;

         while (count < 101)
         {
             if (doorChoice == prizeDoor)
             {
                 cout << "Great Job! You won!" << endl;
             }
             else {
                 cout << "Not this time!" << endl;
             }
         }

         while (count < 201)
         {
             if (doorSwitch == prizeDoor)
             {
                 cout << "You switched and won!" << endl;
             }
             else {
                 cout << "You switched and lost!" << endl;
             }
         }

         if (doorChoice == prizeDoor)
         {
             stayWin++;
         }
         if (doorSwitch == prizeDoor)
         {
             switchWin++;
         }
         count++;
     }
     cout << "Your win percentage when staying was " << stayWin << "%!" << endl;
     cout << "Your win percentage when switching was " << switchWin << "%!" << endl;
     return 0;
 }
7
  • 2
    Don’t declare all variables at the beginning, declare each variable where you use it first – not earlier! Furthermore, your variable types are wrong. You don’t want int for all of them. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 25 '13 at 7:06
  • 2
    @KonradRudolph thats really a matter of preference, its fine having them declared where they are, however they should be initialized with a default value. pptaszek you havent initialised the variables with data in some of them, check your order of operations! – Matthew Pigram Sep 25 '13 at 7:11
  • 3
    @Matthew No, it isn’t. As you can see it’s error prone. It also makes the code’s logic harder to follow because it artificially bloats the program’s state. There’s a consensus that, to keep a program’s state manageable and the program readable, variables should have as small a scope as possible, and thus only be declared where they’re actually used. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 25 '13 at 7:15
  • 1
    @TobiasKienzler: Irrelevant. However like Konrad writes most often you don't need to waste lines and can still profit from static typing. – Benjamin Bannier Sep 25 '13 at 7:23
  • 1
    Btw you should also be aware that the build-in rand may not be a good quality pseudo-random number generator. – Neil Kirk Sep 25 '13 at 10:22
10

Problem 1: operator!=

operator != doesn't do what you think it does.

Did you mean

    doorReveal = !(prizeDoor || doorChoice);
    cout << "The host revealed door number " << doorReveal << " ." << endl;
    doorSwitch = (doorChoice || doorReveal);

I sense another logic issue in determining the doorReveal. I'll have to think about that later.Edit: see problem 5

Problem 2: while

There's also a problem with the while loops:

    while(count < 101)

    // ...

    while(count < 201)

They're infinite loops, because count isn't increased during the loop. I think you meant if there, instead of while.

Problem 3: Initiliazing switchWin and stayWin

These variables are only being incremented. Like @KonradRudolph suggested,

  • declare your variables where they are first needed
  • initialize them
  • while you're at it, mark them const as appropriate

Problem 4: rand()%3 is biased

You should probably use a uniform distribution.

See

Problem 5: Fix your door 'derivation'

Booleans aren't sets. Even if they were, you'd be stuck to binary sets. I propose the following model:

enum doors { door1 = 1, door2 = 2, door3 = 4, any = door1|door2|door3 };

so you can say:

doors const doorReveal = doors(~(prizeDoor | doorChoice)  & any);
doors const doorSwitch = doors(~(doorChoice | doorReveal) & any);

Fixing that results in a program that appears to work:

#include <iostream>
#include <time.h>
using namespace std;

enum doors { door1 = 1, door2 = 2, door3 = 4, any = door1|door2|door3 };

static inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, doors val) {
    switch(val) {
    case door1: return os << "door #1";
    case door2: return os << "door #2";
    case door3: return os << "door #3";
    case any:   return os << "any door";
    }
    return os << "OOPS";
}

int main()
{
    unsigned switchWin = 0;
    unsigned stayWin   = 0;
    srand((unsigned int) time(0));
    for(int count = 0; count <= 200; count++)
    {
        doors const prizeDoor  = doors(1 << rand() / ( RAND_MAX / 3 ));
        doors const doorChoice = doors(1 << rand() / ( RAND_MAX / 3 )); 
        cout << "The prize door is door number " << prizeDoor << " ." << endl;
        cout << "The door the contestant chose was door " << doorChoice << endl;
        doors const doorReveal = doors(~(prizeDoor | doorChoice)  & any);
        doors const doorSwitch = doors(~(doorChoice | doorReveal) & any);

        cout << "The host revealed door number " << doorReveal << " ." << endl;
        if(count < 101)
        {
            if(doorChoice == prizeDoor)
            {
                cout << "Great Job! You won!" << endl;
            }
            else
            {
                cout << "Not this time!" << endl;
            }
        };
        if(count < 201)
        {
            if(doorSwitch == prizeDoor)
            {
                cout << "You switched and won!" << endl;
            }
            else
            {
                cout << "You switched and lost!" << endl;
            }
        };
        if(doorChoice == prizeDoor)
        {
            stayWin++;
        }
        if(doorSwitch == prizeDoor)
        {
            switchWin++;
        };
        count++;
    }
    cout << "Your win percentage when staying was " << stayWin << "%!" << endl;
    cout << "Your win percentage when switching was " << switchWin << "%!" << endl;
    return 0;
}
7
  • I sense another logic issue in determining the doorReveal. I'll have to think about that later. – sehe Sep 25 '13 at 7:19
  • 'revealed door 0' is not a valid result -- it can't work: !(prizeDoor || doorChoice); is always 0, as doors are numbered '1,2,3'. Untested, but doorReveal = 6-prizeDoor-doorChoice ought to work. – Jongware Sep 25 '13 at 10:05
  • @Jongware Awesome. Thanks for reminding me. I decided to 'fix' it in the sane fashion: Hold on - brainfart Be back after lunch – sehe Sep 25 '13 at 10:14
  • @Jongware there. I think it's fixed now. There's still considerable problems with the branches (I think <101 and <201 should be mutually exclusive. I also think that the condition doorChoice==prizeDoor is being detected late. – sehe Sep 25 '13 at 12:40
  • The OP "staying with the original door choice on the first 100 tries and then switching when door is revealed on the next 100 tries .." suggests you are correct, it need to be a simple if (count < 100) .. else .. The stayWin and switchWin statements can be moved inside each of these. Also: the for loop should count up to 200, not including. Your doors selection can be easier written (and mentally parsed) as any - prizeDoor - doorChoice, or possibly as doorReveal = doors(any ^ prizeDoor ^ doorChoice) (where XOR dubs for NOT). – Jongware Sep 25 '13 at 14:57

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