14

My understanding is that in order to get the date from a file passed into a subroutine as an argument, you must re-set that argument as a variable within the subroutine. Is this correct? This doesn't make since to me, so I am wondering if I do not fully understand what is going on. I can use the passed in argument in practically any other subroutine code except for date extraction.

set setupEXE=setup.exe

CALL :SUB_CheckCorrectDate %setupEXE%
GOTO EOF
::----------------------------------

:SUB_CheckCorrectDate
set filename=%1%

:: SUCCESSFUL
for %%x in (%filename%) do set FileDate=%%~tx
@For /F "tokens=1-3 delims=-/ " %%A in ('@echo %FileDate%') do @( 
Set file_Month=%%A
Set file_Day=%%B
Set file_Year=%%C
)

:: GET ERROR    
for %%x in (%1%) do set FileDate=%%~tx
@For /F "tokens=1-3 delims=-/ " %%A in ('@echo %FileDate%') do @( 
Set file_Month=%%A
Set file_Day=%%B
Set file_Year=%%C
)    

GOTO:EOF

:: ------------------
:EOF

2 Answers 2

19

Use %1 to access the parameter, not %i%.

The argument variables have the same modifiers as FOR variables, so you can use %~t1.

No need to execute a command in your FOR /F. It is simpler to process a string literal using in ("string").

No need for :EOF label. Every script has an implicit :eof. I like to use exit /b instead.

@echo off
setlocal
set "setupEXE=setup.exe"

call :SUB_CheckCorrectDate "%setupEXE%"
exit /b

::----------------------------------

:SUB_CheckCorrectDate
set "filename=%~1"
for /F "tokens=1-3 delims=-/ " %%A in ("%~t1") do ( 
  set "file_Month=%%A"
  set "file_Day=%%B"
  set "file_Year=%%C"
)
exit /b
4
  • You added setlocal. Is there no need for endlocal, is it maybe implicitly done via the exit command?
    – Wolf
    Commented Mar 28, 2018 at 10:03
  • 1
    @Wolf - Yes, there is always an implicit ENDLOCAL at the end of a script or Called subroutine for any remaining SETLOCAL that were instantiated in that routine and have not yet been ended. This even happens if a routine or script ends because it has reached the end of file, even without an explicit EXIT /B.
    – dbenham
    Commented Mar 28, 2018 at 13:40
  • Ah thanks, good to know. On the page setlocal | Microsoft Docs, they missed to add the exit option. Is this a new feature? And, even more important, are the local environments properly stacked on each other?
    – Wolf
    Commented Mar 29, 2018 at 8:19
  • 1
    @Wolf - Yes, they stack properly, and the behavior has been consistent since the introduction of SETLOCAL. And Microsoft batch/cmd.exe documentation is generally crap - loads of missing information, and sometimes simply wrong.
    – dbenham
    Commented Mar 29, 2018 at 11:35
0

if you seriously want to write batch scripts, you should take care for the syntax:

@echo off &setlocal
set "setupEXE=setup.exe"

CALL :SUB_CheckCorrectDate "%setupEXE%"
GOTO EOF
::----------------------------------

:SUB_CheckCorrectDate
set "filename=%~1"

:: SUCCESSFUL
for %%x in ("%filename%") do set "FileDate=%%~tx"
For /F "tokens=1-3 delims=-/ " %%A in ("%FileDate%") do ( 
    Set "file_Month=%%A"
    Set "file_Day=%%B"
    Set "file_Year=%%C"
)

:: GET ERROR    
for %%x in ("%~1") do set "FileDate=%%~tx"
For /F "tokens=1-3 delims=-/ " %%A in ("%FileDate%") do ( 
    Set "file_Month=%%A"
    Set "file_Day=%%B"
    Set "file_Year=%%C"
)    

GOTO:EOF

:: ------------------
:
2
  • ...and maybe also take care to the right way of returning from sub routines via exit /b
    – Wolf
    Commented Mar 28, 2018 at 9:53
  • 4
    @Endoro "if you seriously want to write batch scripts, you should ..." use Rem instead of palliatives like :: etc. Downvote due to this bad mentoring preambule. Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 6:16

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