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I have a c++11 library that I am writing that provides a cross platform API for setting an environment variable. The benefit of c++11 is that all char strings are UTF-8:

environment::Set(const std::string& name, const std::string& value)

On Windows there is the SetEnvironmentVariable function that has two aliases SetEnvironmentVariableA and SetEnvironmentVariableW.

My understanding is that the wide version takes a 16bit wchar_t that in Windows land is UTF-16 and the ANSI version is ASCII.

Is the correct way to use this function to convert the std::string into UTF-16 (with std::codecvt_utf8_utf16 or something) then put in into the wide version of the function?

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  • By default (most build systems have UNICODE defined), the W variant is chosen when you just call SetEnvironmentVariable and hence calling SetEnvironmentVariableW isn't required.
    – legends2k
    Sep 25, 2013 at 15:04

2 Answers 2

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The benefit of c++11 is that all char strings are UTF-8:

This is not specified by C++11 for normal string literals and you'll find VC++ doesn't make it so. If you want UTF-8 strings then you have to ensure that yourself.

My understanding is that the wide version takes a 16bit wchar_t that in Windows land is UTF-16 and the ANSI version is ASCII.

The *A functions always use the system code page which is an extended version of ASCII (and is never UTF-8).

Is the correct way to use this function to convert the std::string into UTF-16 (with std::codecvt_utf8_utf16 or something) then put in into the wide version of the function?

If you have ensured that your strings are UTF-8 (which is a good idea, IMO) then converting to UTF-16 and using the wchar_t version is the correct thing to do.

#include <Windows.h>
#include <codecvt>

int main() {
  std::wstring_convert<std::codecvt_utf8_utf16<wchar_t>,wchar_t> convert;

  std::string var = "\xD0\xBA\xD0\xBE\xD1\x88\xD0\xBA\xD0\xB0"; // кошка
  std::string val = "\xE6\x97\xA5\xE6\x9C\xAC\xE5\x9B\xBD";     // 日本国

  SetEnvironmentVariableW(convert.from_bytes(var).c_str(),
                          convert.from_bytes(val).c_str());
}

With full C++11 conformance we could write std::string var = u8"кошка";, however VC++ doesn't implement this and it appears to be a very low priority item since it doesn't appear explicitly on their roadmap to C++14 conformance.

Alternatively you can write std::string var = "кошка"; if you save your source code as "UTF-8 without BOM". Be aware that that method has caveats such as that you can't use wchar_t literals.

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  • 1
    Good answer, with great example. Sep 25, 2013 at 16:16
  • I thought the default encoding for codecvt_utf8_utf16 was UTF-16BE - and Windows demands LE? No need to specify the endian type here?
    – thomthom
    Dec 14, 2015 at 15:59
  • @thomthom The default mode is big-endian, but that doesn't matter here.
    – bames53
    Dec 14, 2015 at 17:06
  • @bames53 - why does it not matter here when calling a Win32 API function?
    – thomthom
    Dec 14, 2015 at 18:28
  • @thomthom It doesn't matter here when doing the conversion, because the codecvt_mode parameter pertains to the external encoding, which in the case of codecvt_utf8_utf16 is UTF-8, for which endianness is irrelevant. The endianness used for the internal encoding is never affected by the codecvt_mode parameter.
    – bames53
    Dec 14, 2015 at 18:36
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Yes, Windows supports Unicode only through the "wide" versions of its APIs (that use UTF-16); the "ANSI" (char-based) functions only support "local" codepages, not UTF-8.

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  • FYI Visual Studio 2013 is deprecating non-Unicode builds: blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2013/07/08/… Sep 25, 2013 at 15:02
  • @the_mandrill: that was about time, especially since the only sensible targets for MBCS builds (Windows 9x & co.) aren't supported by the CRT anyway since several VC++ versions. Sep 25, 2013 at 15:03
  • OK, so it is safe to call the function with reinterpret_cast<const wchar_t * const>(std::utf16string.data()) once the std::string is converted? Sep 25, 2013 at 15:09
  • @MattClarkson: uhm, why would you need that reinterpret_cast? You should use a wide string class to store the UTF16 string and its c_str() method to get a constant pointer to its data. Sep 25, 2013 at 15:15
  • @MatteoItalia +1 sorry, didn't quite understand all the codecvt things available to me :) Do you know if Windows expects little or big endian UTF-16? Sep 25, 2013 at 15:17

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