38

How can I import an arbitrary python source file (whose filename could contain any characters, and does not always ends with .py) in Python 3.3+?

I used imp.load_module as follows:

>>> import imp
>>> path = '/tmp/a-b.txt'
>>> with open(path, 'U') as f:
...     mod = imp.load_module('a_b', f, path, ('.py', 'U', imp.PY_SOURCE))
...
>>> mod
<module 'a_b' from '/tmp/a-b.txt'>

It still works in Python 3.3, but according to imp.load_module documentation, it is deprecated:

Deprecated since version 3.3: Unneeded as loaders should be used to load modules and find_module() is deprecated.

and imp module documentation recommends to use importlib:

Note New programs should use importlib rather than this module.

What is the proper way to load an arbitrary python source file in Python 3.3+ without using the deprecated imp.load_module function?

  • 2
    Can I ask why you are doing this? I'm the maintainer of importlib and I have been trying to get answers from folks as to why they use imp.load_module() over a straight import statement. Do you expect to import the module by name later (e.g. import a_b)? Do you care that any custom importers won't be used in this approach? Do you expect the module to be full-featured (e.g. define __name__ and __loader__)? – Brett Cannon Mar 31 '14 at 15:49
  • 1
    @BrettCannon, A third-party program regularly (once a hour) modify a text file that contains python statements (mainly THIS='blah' like lines). The name of the file is not ended with .py. My program read that file. – falsetru Mar 31 '14 at 15:58
  • 1
    @BrettCannon, I'm not aware of custom importers. I don't care the module to be full-featured. – falsetru Mar 31 '14 at 15:59
  • 1
    IOW using Python as a really simple data structure format. Thanks for the info! – Brett Cannon Mar 31 '14 at 16:33
  • 1
    @BrettCannon — I just ran into a case where I needed to import some Python code from within a directory which was named as a version number (e.g., "v1.0.2"). While possible, it would be highly undesirable to rename the directory. I wound up using stefan-scherfke's solution below. – Andrew Miner Feb 27 '18 at 20:16
46

Found a solution from importlib test code.

Using importlib.machinery.SourceFileLoader:

>>> import importlib.machinery
>>> loader = importlib.machinery.SourceFileLoader('a_b', '/tmp/a-b.txt')
>>> mod = loader.load_module()
>>> mod
<module 'a_b' from '/tmp/a-b.txt'>

NOTE: only works in Python 3.3+.

UPDATE Loader.load_module is deprecated since Python 3.4. Use Loader.exec_module instead:

>>> import types
>>> import importlib.machinery
>>> loader = importlib.machinery.SourceFileLoader('a_b', '/tmp/a-b.txt')
>>> mod = types.ModuleType(loader.name)
>>> loader.exec_module(mod)
>>> mod
<module 'a_b'>

>>> import importlib.machinery
>>> import importlib.util
>>> loader = importlib.machinery.SourceFileLoader('a_b', '/tmp/a-b.txt')
>>> spec = importlib.util.spec_from_loader(loader.name, loader)
>>> mod = importlib.util.module_from_spec(spec)
>>> loader.exec_module(mod)
>>> mod
<module 'a_b' from '/tmp/a-b.txt'>
  • 18
    Downvoter: How can I improve the answer? If you have a better way to accomplish what I want, please let me know. – falsetru Nov 8 '13 at 8:56
  • 3
    There's a helpful warning that load_module ignores via warnings.catch_warnings. If you instead use mod = imp.load_source('a_b', '/tmp/a-b.txt'), it raises the following warning (use -Wall): DeprecationWarning: imp.load_source() is deprecated; use importlib.machinery.SourceFileLoader(name, pathname).load_module() instead. – eryksun Feb 18 '14 at 4:00
  • 1
    @eryksun, You're right. Thank you for the comment. BTW, Python 3.4(rc1) does not display the alternative usage unlike Python 3.3.x. – falsetru Feb 18 '14 at 7:46
  • What's the difference between the first and the second example at the bottom? – Matthew D. Scholefield May 11 '18 at 21:15
  • @MatthewD.Scholefield ways to get module objects are different. Using Module type directly or using utility. – falsetru May 12 '18 at 1:02
12

Shorter version of @falsetrue 's solution:

>>> import importlib.util
>>> spec = importlib.util.spec_from_file_location('a_b', '/tmp/a-b.py')
>>> mod = importlib.util.module_from_spec(spec)
>>> spec.loader.exec_module(mod)
>>> mod
<module 'a_b' from '/tmp/a-b.txt'>

I tested it with Python 3.5 and 3.6.

According to the comments, it does not work with arbitrary file extensions.

  • 1
    importlib.util.spec_from_file_location(..) returns None for me; causing an exception for the following importlib.util.module_from_spec(..) call. (See i.imgur.com/ZjyFhif.png) – falsetru Jan 12 '17 at 6:04
  • 3
    importlib.util.spec_from_file_location works for known file name extensions (.py, .so, ..), but not for others (.txt...) – falsetru Jan 13 '17 at 5:29
  • Oh, I’m using it only with Python files but modified my example to look like the one above and did not test it … I updated it. – Stefan Scherfke Jan 13 '17 at 6:32
5

Similar to @falsetru but for Python 3.5+ and accounting for what the importlib doc states on using importlib.util.module_from_spec over types.ModuleType:

This function [importlib.util.module_from_spec] is preferred over using types.ModuleType to create a new module as spec is used to set as many import-controlled attributes on the module as possible.

We are able to import any file with importlib alone by modifying the importlib.machinery.SOURCE_SUFFIXES list.

import importlib

importlib.machinery.SOURCE_SUFFIXES.append('') # empty string to allow any file
spec = importlib.util.spec_from_file_location(module_name, file_path)
module = importlib.util.module_from_spec(spec)
spec.loader.exec_module(module)
# if desired: importlib.machinery.SOURCE_SUFFIXES.pop()
  • 1
    Interestingly enough, while this hack of appending the empty string to the list of source suffixes works great for importing renamed Python source modules, the equivalent for importing renamed extension modules does not work... That is, using importlib.machinery.EXTENSION_SUFFIXES.append('') still makes importlib.util.spec_from_file_location return None. – mxk Aug 26 '18 at 8:28
  • presumably, importlib.util.spec_from_file_location should still work with extensions if you specify a loader – awalllllll Dec 8 '18 at 22:05

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