1

My goal is to have the user input a number N and the size of the arrayList be 2N + 1.

Ultimately my arrayList for N=2 should be "OO XX".

public Board(int size)
    {
        tiles = new ArrayList<Tile>(size);

        for(int index = 0; index < size; index++)
        {
            tiles.add(new Tile('O')); 
            tiles.add(new Tile(' '));
            tiles.add(new Tile('X')); 

            System.out.print(tiles.get(index));
        }          

    }

The above code gives me "O XO". How can I modify it to show me OO XX ?

Thanks ahead!

  • If N=2, then size would be 2N+1 = 5. It will never be "OOO XXX" which is 7 tiles, but will terminate after 5 tiles "O XO " – hrv Sep 25 '13 at 19:27
  • your question does not match your example. For N=2, 2N+1 is 5, thus the result would be "OO XX" not "OOO XXX". – djb Sep 25 '13 at 19:29
1

Try this:

// it's not necessary to specify the initial capacity,
// but this is the correct way to do it for this problem
tiles = new ArrayList<Tile>(2*size + 1);

// first add all the 'O'
for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
    tiles.add(new Tile('O'));
// add the ' '
tiles.add(new Tile(' '));
// finally add all the 'X'
for (int index = 0; index < size; index++)
    tiles.add(new Tile('X'));

// verify the result, for size=2
System.out.println(tiles);
=> [O, O,  , X, X]
  • use N people not size – hasan Sep 25 '13 at 19:29
  • 4
    @hasan the parameter is called size, not N – Óscar López Sep 25 '13 at 19:30
  • ur code is wrong will fill only half +1 with xs u r replacing the os int the 1st loop with the 2nd loop – hasan Sep 25 '13 at 19:33
  • my bad its add.... – hasan Sep 25 '13 at 19:35
  • 1
    @hasan - Constructing the array with an integer argument sets the initial capacity. The array still starts out empty (size is 0). Setting an initial capacity improves performance in cases where you know exactly how many objects your array is going to contain. – Ted Hopp Sep 25 '13 at 19:40
4

If you would like to do it in a single loop, you can do it like this:

for (int i = 0 ; i != 2*size+1 ; i++) {
    tiles.add(new Tile(i==size ? ' ' : (i<size ? 'O' : 'X')));
}

The idea is to compute the total size (that's 2*size+1) and then use conditionals to decide on which side of the midpoint we are.

  • 3
    Unusual use of != instead of standard <. Will turn into an endless loop for negative size. – Marko Topolnik Sep 25 '13 at 19:31
  • 1
    ...Please don't actually do this? Cramming this into a single loop is nice in principle, but it's kind of unreadable this way. – Louis Wasserman Sep 25 '13 at 19:32
  • 1
    I think putting it in a single loop is quite nice, and doesn't hurt readability. Actually, I think it increases readability. – axiopisty Sep 25 '13 at 19:34
  • 1
    @MarkoTopolnik That's not a slightest bit unusual (here is why I use it); Making it an infinite loop is good for debugging: negative sizes have no place in production code, right? – dasblinkenlight Sep 25 '13 at 19:35
  • 3
    @Cruncher: I'm a huge fan of ternaries. I use them all the time. But I have come to the conclusion that if you are going to nest them, you should at least break up the formatting onto multiple lines. – Louis Wasserman Sep 25 '13 at 19:39
2

Parameter you pass in one-arg ArrayList(int) constructor is not the fixed size of the list. It's just the initial capacity. If your size is fix, then you can use an array:

Tile[] tiles = new Tile[2 * n + 1];

And then filling the array is pretty simple, by using Arrays#fill(Object[] a, int fromIndex, int toIndex, Object val) method:

Arrays.fill(tiles, 0, n, new Tile('O'));
tiles[n] = new Tile(' ');
Arrays.fill(tiles, (n + 1), (2 * n + 1), new Tile('X'));

Although, as noted in comments, this will fill the array indices with reference to same object. Might work fine with immutable Tile, but not with mutable one.

  • What's the advantages of using an array over an arraylist with an initial capacity? The operations aren't any slower, there's already room in the array for what he needs – Cruncher Sep 25 '13 at 19:32
  • Wouldn't that fill the entire array with references to just three tile objects?.. On the other hand, if Tile is immutable, that would be the desired effect... – dasblinkenlight Sep 25 '13 at 19:33
  • @dasblinkenlight. Umm. Actually right. Missed that part somehow. – Rohit Jain Sep 25 '13 at 19:33
  • @dasblinkenlight If Tile isn't immutable, it should be fixed to become immutable :) – Marko Topolnik Sep 25 '13 at 19:33
  • 1
    @MarkoTopolnik: The "temporary collection" has only O(1) memory consumption, so I'm inclined to call it a wash. – Louis Wasserman Sep 25 '13 at 19:52
1

Your initialization of tiles is just fine, but the rest of the logic needs some work.

for(int index = 0; index < size; index++) {
  tiles.add(new Tile('O')); 
}
tiles.add(new Tile(' ')); 
for (int index = 0; index < size; index++) {
  tiles.add(new Tile('X'));
}

Or, if you feel like being cute...

tiles.addAll(Collections.nCopies(size, new Tile('O')));
tiles.add(new Tile(' '));
tiles.addAll(Collections.nCopies(size, new Tile('X')));

...though that version might be a problem if you expect to modify the Tile objects later.

  • 1
    use N people not size – hasan Sep 25 '13 at 19:29
  • add: tiles = new ArrayList<Tile>(2*size + 1); and consider using Singleton patter (only create one Tile for each of 'O', ' ' and 'X' – djb Sep 25 '13 at 19:31
  • @djb: the first line was already in the OP's post, and the OP has provided no indication of whether Tile is mutable or safe to use as a singleton at all. I'm sticking to the OP's apparent expectations and requirements as much as I can, including using the OP's size variable, @hasan. – Louis Wasserman Sep 25 '13 at 19:33
  • sorry u r good u didnt initialise :) – hasan Sep 25 '13 at 19:38
  • 1
    I like the "no-loops" approach! – dasblinkenlight Sep 25 '13 at 19:42

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