222

I followed this thread to override -preferredStatusBarStyle, but it isn't called. Are there any options that I can change to enable it? (I'm using XIBs in my project.)

  • It doesn't get called in what context: simulator? on a device? – bneely Sep 26 '13 at 7:50
  • @bneely both of them. – trgoofi Sep 26 '13 at 7:53
  • You're using the iOS 7 simulator, an iOS 7 device, and your base SDK is 7.0? – bneely Sep 26 '13 at 7:54
  • @bneely iOS SDK 7.0 is show below my project name, is that means my base SDK is 7.0? – trgoofi Sep 26 '13 at 8:02
  • In the build settings, "Base SDK" is where the value is set. It sounds like your project is set to 7.0. – bneely Sep 26 '13 at 8:15

20 Answers 20

110

Possible root cause

I had the same problem, and figured out it was happening because I wasn't setting the root view controller in my application window.

The UIViewController in which I had implemented the preferredStatusBarStyle was used in a UITabBarController, which controlled the appearance of the views on the screen.

When I set the root view controller to point to this UITabBarController, the status bar changes started to work correctly, as expected (and the preferredStatusBarStyle method was getting called).

(BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    ... // other view controller loading/setup code

    self.window.rootViewController = rootTabBarController;
    [self.window makeKeyAndVisible];
    return YES;
}

Alternative method (Deprecated in iOS 9)

Alternatively, you can call one of the following methods, as appropriate, in each of your view controllers, depending on its background color, instead of having to use setNeedsStatusBarAppearanceUpdate:

[[UIApplication sharedApplication] setStatusBarStyle:UIStatusBarStyleLightContent];

or

[[UIApplication sharedApplication] setStatusBarStyle:UIStatusBarStyleDefault];

Note that you'll also need to set UIViewControllerBasedStatusBarAppearance to NO in the plist file if you use this method.

  • 2
    I have the same problem as you, not setting the root view controller. How the hell did you find that? – trgoofi Sep 27 '13 at 1:26
  • 1
    I suspected that something in the framework wasn't getting the notification from setNeedsStatusBarAppearanceUpdate - my suspicions were confirmed when I made this change. – AbdullahC Sep 27 '13 at 2:09
  • 2
    A related issue that I found in an app was a view controller with a full screen child view controller that did not override childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle and childViewControllerForStatusBarHidden to return that child view controller. If you have your own view controller hierarchy you need to provide these methods to inform the system of which view controller should be used to determine the status bar style. – Jon Steinmetz Oct 29 '13 at 16:19
  • setting the rootviewcontroller does not change anything. You should work with the comment of Jon. And be careful when calling setneedsstatusbarappearanceUpdate. You should call it from the parent to work. – doozMen Aug 28 '14 at 13:08
  • 1
    @Hippo you are genius!! How did you find that it was because of not setting rootviewcontroller? – ViruMax Nov 7 '14 at 7:19
946

For anyone using a UINavigationController:

The UINavigationController does not forward on preferredStatusBarStyle calls to its child view controllers. Instead it manages its own state - as it should, it is drawing at the top of the screen where the status bar lives and so should be responsible for it. Therefor implementing preferredStatusBarStyle in your VCs within a nav controller will do nothing - they will never be called.

The trick is what the UINavigationController uses to decide what to return for UIStatusBarStyleDefault or UIStatusBarStyleLightContent. It bases this on its UINavigationBar.barStyle. The default (UIBarStyleDefault) results in the dark foreground UIStatusBarStyleDefault status bar. And UIBarStyleBlack will give a UIStatusBarStyleLightContent status bar.

TL;DR:

If you want UIStatusBarStyleLightContent on a UINavigationController use:

self.navigationController.navigationBar.barStyle = UIBarStyleBlack;
  • 53
    Nice! Note that preferredStatusBarStyle will in fact get called on the child view controller if you hide the navigation bar (set navigationBarHidden to YES), exactly as appropriate. – Patrick Pijnappel Dec 16 '13 at 10:08
  • 23
    Thanks for this answer. If you want to set the barStyle for all your navigation bars, call [[UINavigationBar appearance] setBarStyle:UIBarStyleBlack] – Thomas Desert Jan 23 '14 at 9:59
  • 11
    Perfect answer. None of the other answers on SO took the UINavigationController into consideration. 2 hours of banging my head against the keyboard. – Ryan Alford Feb 22 '14 at 16:49
  • 8
    Kudos to @Patrick for indicating that navigationBarHidden set to YES will actually have preferredStatusBarStyle called, and a warning to those that might stumble on this: it works with navigationBarHidden, but not with navigationBar.hidden! – jcaron Dec 4 '14 at 17:59
  • 4
    should be obvious, but you also need "View controller-based status bar appearance" set to YES in Info.plist for this to work. – Code Baller Oct 1 '15 at 5:37
88

So I actually added a category to UINavigationController but used the methods:

-(UIViewController *)childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle;
-(UIViewController *)childViewControllerForStatusBarHidden;

and had those return the current visible UIViewController. That lets the current visible view controller set its own preferred style/visibility.

Here's a complete code snippet for it:

In Swift:

extension UINavigationController {

    public override func childViewControllerForStatusBarHidden() -> UIViewController? {
        return self.topViewController
    }

    public override func childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle() -> UIViewController? {
        return self.topViewController
    }
}

In Objective-C:

@interface UINavigationController (StatusBarStyle)

@end

@implementation UINavigationController (StatusBarStyle)

-(UIViewController *)childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle {
    return self.topViewController;
}

-(UIViewController *)childViewControllerForStatusBarHidden {
    return self.topViewController;
}

@end

And for good measure, here's how it's implemented then in a UIViewController:

In Swift

override public func preferredStatusBarStyle() -> UIStatusBarStyle {
    return .LightContent
}

override func prefersStatusBarHidden() -> Bool {
    return false
}

In Objective-C

-(UIStatusBarStyle)preferredStatusBarStyle {
    return UIStatusBarStyleLightContent; // your own style
}

- (BOOL)prefersStatusBarHidden {
    return NO; // your own visibility code
}

Finally, make sure your app plist does NOT have the "View controller-based status bar appearance" set to NO. Either delete that line or set it to YES (which I believe is the default now for iOS 7?)

  • Looks like return self.topViewController; works for me, but return self.visibleViewController; - not – k06a Nov 21 '14 at 10:37
  • visibleViewController can return currently presented modal controller when you dismiss it. Which is bummer. Use topViewController. – highmaintenance Mar 9 '15 at 11:47
  • This is the best answer I've seen on the matter so far, and the only answer where the writer is not afraid to set the "View controller-based status bar appearance" to YES (which is the default). Well done. – csotiriou Jul 28 '15 at 8:08
  • 1
    @d.lebedev ok, but I don't think any of those problems apply here. You don't need to call super in this method and you do actually want to change the behaviour of all controllers of this type – Edward Sammut Alessi Jun 8 '16 at 9:44
  • 1
    this isn't working for me on iOS 9.3. I guess, this is the problem: This issue is of particular significance because many of the Cocoa classes are implemented using categories. A framework-defined method you try to override may itself have been implemented in a category, and so which implementation takes precedence is not defined. – vikingosegundo Sep 20 '16 at 21:02
51

For anyone still struggling with this, this simple extension in swift should fix the problem for you.

extension UINavigationController {
    override open var childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle: UIViewController? {
        return self.topViewController
    }
}
  • 5
    You sir deserve a medal. – nikans Jul 29 '17 at 1:59
  • 2
    Thank you so much for this!!! – Brittany Aug 16 '17 at 22:18
  • 2
    Thank you very much man. I was returning visibleViewController instead with no success. – Fábio Salata Aug 23 '17 at 23:49
  • 2
    Thanx heaps!!! Yes, give this man a medal!!! – Gary Mansted Dec 19 '17 at 22:41
  • 1
    This is gold. I have a navigation controller embedded in a tab bar and I just threw this in a file and now I can change status bar appearance anywhere I want. – Vahid Amiri May 23 '18 at 20:36
14

Tyson's answer is correct for changing the status bar color to white in UINavigationController.

If anyone want's to accomplish the same result by writing the code in AppDelegate then use below code and write it inside AppDelegate's didFinishLaunchingWithOptions method.

And don't forget to set the UIViewControllerBasedStatusBarAppearance to YES in the .plist file, else the change will not reflect.

Code

- (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions {
     // status bar appearance code
     [[UINavigationBar appearance] setBarStyle:UIBarStyleBlack];

     return YES;
}
9

An addition to Hippo's answer: if you're using a UINavigationController, then it's probably better to add a category:

//  UINavigationController+StatusBarStyle.h:

@interface UINavigationController (StatusBarStyle)

@end



//  UINavigationController+StatusBarStyle.m:

@implementation UINavigationController (StatusBarStyle)

- (UIStatusBarStyle)preferredStatusBarStyle
{
    //also you may add any fancy condition-based code here
    return UIStatusBarStyleLightContent;
}

@end

That solution is probably better than switching to soon-to-be deprecated behaviour.

  • Don't do this, it works for now but may break future behavior. Just change the navBar style - see my answer stackoverflow.com/a/19513714/505457 – Tyson Oct 24 '13 at 23:02
  • 1
    You should use subclass,not category. – shuiyouren Nov 21 '13 at 10:34
  • 2Tyson: Why will it break future behaviour? preferredStatusBarStyle: is the Apple's preferred method to set up Status Bar style. – Artem Abramov Nov 22 '13 at 16:15
  • 2shuiyouren: Why should I increase complexity by subclassing if I can just use a category and include it in every place where I will to? Anyway, that's a question of architecture, not the implementation. – Artem Abramov Nov 22 '13 at 16:17
  • 2
    @ArtemAbramov Because the UINavigationController already implements preferredStatusBarStyle and does UINavigationController specific logic. Right now this logic is based on navigationBar.barStyle but I can see additional checks being added (e.g. UISearchDisplayController moving to hide navbar mode). By overriding the default logic you loose all this functionality and leave yourself open for annoying 'wtf' moments in the future. See my answer above for the correct way to do this while still supporting in-built nav controller behaviour. – Tyson Nov 27 '13 at 3:37
8

My app used all three: UINavigationController, UISplitViewController, UITabBarController, thus these all seem to take control over the status bar and will cause preferedStatusBarStyle to not be called for their children. To override this behavior you can create an extension like the rest of the answers have mentioned. Here is an extension for all three, in Swift 4. Wish Apple was more clear about this sort of stuff.

extension UINavigationController {
    open override var childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle: UIViewController? {
        return self.topViewController
    }

    open override var childViewControllerForStatusBarHidden: UIViewController? {
        return self.topViewController
    }
}

extension UITabBarController {
    open override var childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle: UIViewController? {
        return self.childViewControllers.first
    }

    open override var childViewControllerForStatusBarHidden: UIViewController? {
        return self.childViewControllers.first
    }
}

extension UISplitViewController {
    open override var childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle: UIViewController? {
        return self.childViewControllers.first
    }

    open override var childViewControllerForStatusBarHidden: UIViewController? {
        return self.childViewControllers.first
    }
}
  • This is the only solution that works. All answers on SO point to the standard solution which won't work for any app with NavigationControllers. Thank you!!! – Houman Aug 18 '18 at 18:55
6

@serenn's answer above is still a great one for the case of UINavigationControllers. However, for swift 3 the childViewController functions have been changed to vars. So the UINavigationController extension code should be:

override open var childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle: UIViewController? {
  return topViewController
}

override open var childViewControllerForStatusBarHidden: UIViewController? {
  return topViewController
}

And then in the view controller that should dictate the status bar style:

override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
   return .lightContent
}
5

If your viewController is under UINavigationController.

Subclass UINavigationController and add

override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
    return topViewController?.preferredStatusBarStyle ?? .default
}

ViewController's preferredStatusBarStyle will be called.

4

UIStatusBarStyle in iOS 7

The status bar in iOS 7 is transparent, the view behind it shows through.

The style of the status bar refers to the appearances of its content. In iOS 7, the status bar content is either dark (UIStatusBarStyleDefault) or light (UIStatusBarStyleLightContent). Both UIStatusBarStyleBlackTranslucent and UIStatusBarStyleBlackOpaque are deprecated in iOS 7.0. Use UIStatusBarStyleLightContent instead.

How to change UIStatusBarStyle

If below the status bar is a navigation bar, the status bar style will be adjusted to match the navigation bar style (UINavigationBar.barStyle):

Specifically, if the navigation bar style is UIBarStyleDefault, the status bar style will be UIStatusBarStyleDefault; if the navigation bar style is UIBarStyleBlack, the status bar style will be UIStatusBarStyleLightContent.

If there is no navigation bar below the status bar, the status bar style can be controlled and changed by an individual view controller while the app runs.

-[UIViewController preferredStatusBarStyle] is a new method added in iOS 7. It can be overridden to return the preferred status bar style:

- (UIStatusBarStyle)preferredStatusBarStyle
  {
      return UIStatusBarStyleLightContent;
  }

If the status bar style should be controlled by a child view controller instead of self, override -[UIViewController childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle] to return that child view controller.

If you prefer to opt out of this behavior and set the status bar style by using the -[UIApplication statusBarStyle] method, add the UIViewControllerBasedStatusBarAppearance key to an app’s Info.plist file and give it the value NO.

4

If anyone is using a Navigation Controller and wants all of their navigation controllers to have the black style, you can write an extension to UINavigationController like this in Swift 3 and it will apply to all navigation controllers (instead of assigning it to one controller at a time).

extension UINavigationController {

    override open func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        self.navigationBar.barStyle = UIBarStyle.black
    }

}
  • But what if me navigationbar is hidden? – Slavcho Jan 30 '17 at 8:22
  • Because I need the navigation to be hidden and the status bar to be visible. – Slavcho Jan 30 '17 at 8:46
  • 1
    Perfect solution – Alejandro Luengo May 15 '17 at 22:53
4

On a UINavigationController, preferredStatusBarStyle is not called because its topViewController is preferred to self. So, to get preferredStatusBarStyle called on an UINavigationController, you need to change its childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle.

To do it for one UINavigationController (my recommendation):

class MyRootNavigationController: UINavigationController {
    override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
        return .lightContent
    }
    override var childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle: UIViewController? {
        return nil
    }
}

To do it for all UINavigationController (warning: it affects UIDocumentPickerViewController, UIImagePickerController, etc.):

extension UINavigationController {
    open override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
        return .lightContent
    }
    open override var childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle: UIViewController? {
        return nil
    }
}
1

Swift 3 iOS 10 Solution:

override var preferredStatusBarStyle: UIStatusBarStyle {
    return .lightContent
 }
0

Here's my method for solving this.

Define a protocol called AGViewControllerAppearance.

AGViewControllerAppearance.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@protocol AGViewControllerAppearance <NSObject>

@optional

- (BOOL)showsStatusBar;
- (BOOL)animatesStatusBarVisibility;
- (UIStatusBarStyle)preferredStatusBarStyle;
- (UIStatusBarAnimation)prefferedStatusBarAnimation;

@end

Define a category on UIViewController called Upgrade.

UIViewController+Upgrade.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface UIViewController (Upgrade)

//
//  Replacements
//

- (void)upgradedViewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated;

@end

UIViewController+Upgrade.m

#import "UIViewController+Upgrade.h"

#import <objc/runtime.h>

#import "AGViewControllerAppearance.h" // This is the appearance protocol

@implementation UIViewController (Upgrade)

+ (void)load
{
#pragma clang diagnostic push
#pragma clang diagnostic ignored "-Wselector"
    Method viewWillAppear = class_getInstanceMethod(self, @selector(viewWillAppear:));
#pragma clang diagnostic pop
    Method upgradedViewWillAppear = class_getInstanceMethod(self, @selector(upgradedViewWillAppear:));
    method_exchangeImplementations(viewWillAppear, upgradedViewWillAppear);
}

#pragma mark - Implementation

- (void)upgradedViewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    //
    //  Call the original message (it may be a little confusing that we're
    //  calling the 'same' method, but we're actually calling the original one :) )
    //

    [self upgradedViewWillAppear:animated];

    //
    //  Implementation
    //

    if ([self conformsToProtocol:@protocol(AGViewControllerAppearance)])
    {
        UIViewController <AGViewControllerAppearance> *viewControllerConformingToAppearance =
        (UIViewController <AGViewControllerAppearance> *)self;

        //
        //  Status bar
        //

        if ([viewControllerConformingToAppearance respondsToSelector:@selector(preferredStatusBarStyle)])
        {
            BOOL shouldAnimate = YES;

            if ([viewControllerConformingToAppearance respondsToSelector:@selector(animatesStatusBarVisibility)])
            {
                shouldAnimate = [viewControllerConformingToAppearance animatesStatusBarVisibility];
            }

            [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setStatusBarStyle:[viewControllerConformingToAppearance preferredStatusBarStyle]
                                                        animated:shouldAnimate];
        }

        if ([viewControllerConformingToAppearance respondsToSelector:@selector(showsStatusBar)])
        {
            UIStatusBarAnimation animation = UIStatusBarAnimationSlide;

            if ([viewControllerConformingToAppearance respondsToSelector:@selector(prefferedStatusBarAnimation)])
            {
                animation = [viewControllerConformingToAppearance prefferedStatusBarAnimation];
            }

            [[UIApplication sharedApplication] setStatusBarHidden:(! [viewControllerConformingToAppearance showsStatusBar])
                                                    withAnimation:animation];
        }
    }
}

@end

Now, it's time to say that you're view controller is implementing the AGViewControllerAppearance protocol.

Example:

@interface XYSampleViewController () <AGViewControllerAppearance>

... the rest of the interface

@end

Of course, you can implement the rest of the methods (showsStatusBar, animatesStatusBarVisibility, prefferedStatusBarAnimation) from the protocol and UIViewController+Upgrade will do the proper customization based on the values provided by them.

0

If someone run into this problem with UISearchController. Just create a new subclass of UISearchController, and then add code below into that class:

override func preferredStatusBarStyle() -> UIStatusBarStyle {
    return .LightContent
}
0

In Swift for any kind of UIViewController:

In your AppDelegate set:

func application(application: UIApplication, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions launchOptions: [NSObject: AnyObject]?) -> Bool {
    window!.rootViewController = myRootController
    return true
}

myRootController can be any kind of UIViewController, e.g. UITabBarController or UINavigationController.

Then, override this root controller like this:

class RootController: UIViewController {
    override func preferredStatusBarStyle() -> UIStatusBarStyle {
        return .LightContent
    }
}

This will change the appearance of the status bar in your whole app, because the root controller is solely responsible for the status bar appearance.

Remember to set the property View controller-based status bar appearance to YES in your Info.plist to make this work (which is the default).

  • @How does it in swift3? – aircraft Dec 6 '16 at 14:58
0

Note that when using the self.navigationController.navigationBar.barStyle = UIBarStyleBlack; solution

be sure to go to your plist and set "View controller-based status bar appearance" to YES. If its NO it will not work.

  • Setting UIViewControllerBasedStatusBarAppearance to YES in the project plist made all the difference for me. I had forgotten about it. – filo May 9 '18 at 10:50
0

In addition to serenn's answer, if you are presenting a view controller with a modalPresentationStyle (for example .overCurrentContext), you should also call this on the newly presented view controller:

presentedViewController.modalPresentationCapturesStatusBarAppearance = true

Don't forget to also override the preferredStatusBarStyle in the presented view controller.

0

Most of the answers don't include good implementation of childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle method for UINavigationController. According to my experience you should handle such cases as when transparent view controller is presented over navigation controller. In these cases you should pass control to your modal controller (visibleViewController), but not when it's disappearing.

override var childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle: UIViewController? {
  var childViewController = visibleViewController
  if let controller = childViewController, controller.isBeingDismissed {
    childViewController = topViewController
  }
  return childViewController?.childViewControllerForStatusBarStyle ?? childViewController
}
-2

The NavigationController or TabBarController are the ones that need to provide the style. Here is how I solved: https://stackoverflow.com/a/39072526/242769

  • If you think that this is a duplicate of another question, please close vote it as duplicate – Tiny Giant Aug 22 '16 at 7:07

protected by Yogesh Suthar May 23 '15 at 11:28

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