3

While trying to reduce some default hash code, I came to discover that you could add to none to produce none or to produce what you're adding to it. Is there a particular reason for this? Will this change on different architectures or can I rely on this ability?

DB<1> print none + 1

DB<2> print 1 + none
1

And just for those that are curious, this is how I'm using it

foreach (@someArray) {
    unless ($someHash{$_}++) {
        $someHash{$_} = 1;
    }
}

as a reduction for

foreach (@someArray) {
    if (exists $someHash{$_}) {
        $someHash{$_}++;
    } else {
        $someHash{$_} = 1;
    }
}
  • 1
    unless ($someHash{$_}++) will set $someHash{$_} to 1 if $_ is not a valid key in %someHash making the conditional code irrelevant. Why? Because $someHash{$_} of a key that doesn't exist that gets incremented auto-vivifies the key and incrementing undef returns 1. – PP. Sep 26 '13 at 16:11
  • @PP Well how about that. That really simplifies that code block. I'll take my code samples away until I find better samples. I'm still curious about the whole none+1 thing. – agweber Sep 26 '13 at 16:17
  • Sorry @agweber I have to rollback the code you provided so the question makes sense to others who stumble upon it. If you want to add an update at the bottom feel free. – PP. Sep 26 '13 at 16:20
  • @PP But you've just proven to me that the code sample is irrelevant. I feel that the debug tests are enough to provide information for those that stumble upon this to understand what I'm asking about.. – agweber Sep 26 '13 at 16:23
8

You are not doing what you think you are doing. These two statements:

print none + 1
print 1 + none

Are not as straightforward as you might think. Because you have warnings turned off, you do not know what they do. Lets try them out in the command prompt, with warnings turned on (-w switch):

$ perl -lwe'print none + 1'
Unquoted string "none" may clash with future reserved word at -e line 1.
Name "main::none" used only once: possible typo at -e line 1.
print() on unopened filehandle none at -e line 1.

$ perl -lwe'print 1 + none'
Unquoted string "none" may clash with future reserved word at -e line 1.
Argument "none" isn't numeric in addition (+) at -e line 1.
1

In the first case, none, which is a bareword, is interpreted as a file handle, and the print statement fails because we never opened a file handle with that name. In the second case, the bareword none is interpreted as a string, which gets converted to a number by the addition operator +, and that number will be zero 0.

You can further clarify this by supplying a specific file handle for the first case:

$ perl -lwe'print STDOUT none + 1'
Unquoted string "none" may clash with future reserved word at -e line 1.
Argument "none" isn't numeric in addition (+) at -e line 1.
1

Which demonstrates that there is no real difference between none + 1 and 1 + none.

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