Which of these optimizations is better and in what situation? Why?

Intuitively, I am getting the feeling that loop tiling will in general be a better optimization.

What about for the below example? Assume a cache which can only store about 20 elements in it at any time.

Original Loop:
for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < 1000; j++)
    {
        a[i] += a[i]*b[j];
    }
}

Loop Interchange:
for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < 10; j++)
    {
        a[j] += a[j]*b[i];
    }
}

Loop Tiling:
for(int k = 0; k < 1000; k += 20)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        for(int j = k; j < min(1000, k+20); j++)
        {
            a[i] += a[i]*b[j];
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    I suspect it depends highly on the size of your data set. Tiling doesn't make much sense if your data sets are relatively small (i.e. can fit entirely within cache). – twalberg Sep 26 '13 at 20:30
  • 1
    That is true. I am considering a hypothetical case where the cache size is very low (Assume a cache which can only store about 20 elements in it at any time). – codepk Sep 27 '13 at 0:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first two cases you are exposing in your question are about the same. Things would really change in the following two cases:

CASE 1:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < 1000; j++)
    {
        b[i] += a[i]*a[j];
    }
}

Here you are accessing the matrix "a" as follows: a[0]*a[0], a[0]*a1, a[0]*a[2],.... In most architectures, matrix structures are stored in memory like: a[0]*a[0], a1*a[0], a[2]*a[0] (first column of first row followed by second column of first raw,....). Imagine your cache only could store 5 elements and your matrix is 6x6. The first "pack" of elements that would be stored in cache would be a[0]*a[0] to a[4]*a[0]. Your first acces would cause no cache miss so a[0][0] is stored in cache but the second yes!! a0 is not stored in cache! Then the OS would bring to cache the pack of elements a0 to a4. Then you do the third acces: a[0]*a[2] wich is out of cache again. Another cache miss!

As you can colcude, case 1 is not a good solution for the problem. It causes lots of cache misses that we can avoid changing the code for the following:

CASE 2:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < 1000; j++)
        {
            b[i] += a[i]*a[j];
        }
    }

Here, as you can see, we are accessing the matrix as it's stored in memory. Consequently it's much better (faster) than case 1.

About the third code you posted about loop tiling, loop tiling and also loop unrolling are optimizations that in most cases the compiler does automaticaly. Here's a very interesting post in stackoverflow explaining these two techniques;

Hope it helps! (sorry about my english, I'm not a native speaker)

  • Should'nt it be a[0][0] followed by a[0][1], a[0][2] and so on ... the point about storage in memory? – codepk Sep 26 '13 at 21:39
  • Well, the way how elements are stored in memory, really depends on the architecture of the system you are working with. In some architectures elements are stored as you mention in your comment. However, this is not an important thing to understand the general concept of how should people program their loops if they know something about the architecture where their app will run in. – Antoni Sep 28 '13 at 9:01
  • Did my answer help you? – Antoni Sep 29 '13 at 15:26

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