When doing:

DELETE FROM `jobs` WHERE `job_id` =1 LIMIT 1 

It errors:

#1451 - Cannot delete or update a parent row: a foreign key constraint fails 
(paymesomething.advertisers, CONSTRAINT advertisers_ibfk_1 FOREIGN KEY 
(advertiser_id) REFERENCES jobs (advertiser_id))

Here are my tables:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `advertisers` (
  `advertiser_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `password` char(32) NOT NULL,
  `email` varchar(128) NOT NULL,
  `address` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `phone` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `fax` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `session_token` char(30) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`advertiser_id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `email` (`email`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=2 ;


INSERT INTO `advertisers` (`advertiser_id`, `name`, `password`, `email`, `address`, `phone`, `fax`, `session_token`) VALUES
(1, 'TEST COMPANY', '', '', '', '', '', '');

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `jobs` (
  `job_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `advertiser_id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `shortdesc` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `longdesc` text NOT NULL,
  `address` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `time_added` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `active` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
  `moderated` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`job_id`),
  KEY `advertiser_id` (`advertiser_id`,`active`,`moderated`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=2 ;


INSERT INTO `jobs` (`job_id`, `advertiser_id`, `name`, `shortdesc`, `longdesc`, `address`, `active`, `moderated`) VALUES
(1, 1, 'TEST', 'TESTTEST', 'TESTTESTES', '', 0, 0);

ALTER TABLE `advertisers`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `advertisers_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) REFERENCES `jobs` (`advertiser_id`);

13 Answers 13

up vote 72 down vote accepted

As is, you must delete the row out of the advertisers table before you can delete the row in the jobs table that it references. This:

ALTER TABLE `advertisers`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `advertisers_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) 
      REFERENCES `jobs` (`advertiser_id`);

...is actually the opposite to what it should be. As it is, it means that you'd have to have a record in the jobs table before the advertisers. So you need to use:

ALTER TABLE `jobs`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `advertisers_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) 
      REFERENCES `advertisers` (`advertiser_id`);

Once you correct the foreign key relationship, your delete statement will work.

  • 2
    In the first line: don't you think it should be "that it references" instead of "that references it"? Or have I misunderstood how the references terminology is supposed to work? – Abraham Philip Jul 26 '15 at 17:31
  • 5
    @AbrahamPhilip I was thinking the same thing. advertisers references jobs. – keyser Aug 20 '15 at 7:01

The simple way would be to disable the foreign key check; make the changes then re-enable foreign key check.

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0; -- to disable them
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1; -- to re-enable them
  • 109
    This is not a solution to the problem, but rather a dirty work-around that may not be desired. – madfriend Apr 7 '14 at 15:20
  • 14
    In my case: I just ran a large SQL file and one of the final statements failed, so I just wanna delete all tables, fix the syntax error, and rerun, making this exactly what I was looking for. – ekerner Nov 5 '14 at 17:18
  • 1
    If you were going to do this, why not just remove all of the constraints? – Sablefoste Jun 7 '16 at 12:23
  • 1
    It is useful when doing something like: REPLACE INTO tab_with_constraint ... – Maciek Łoziński Dec 28 '16 at 20:29
  • 5
    The only reason to upvote this answer is if you just want your code to stop yelling at you and forge deeper into spaghetti without understanding the code you are writing. The reason to have foreign keys in the first place is to enforce referential integrity. If you need to disable them to make your code shutup, you probably want to rethink your foreign keys, instead of disabling them. – cytinus Apr 25 '17 at 8:02

Under your current (possibly flawed) design, you must delete the row out of the advertisers table before you can delete the row in the jobs table that it references.

Alternatively, you could set up your foreign key such that a delete in the parent table causes rows in child tables to be deleted automatically. This is called a cascading delete. It looks something like this:

ALTER TABLE `advertisers`
ADD CONSTRAINT `advertisers_ibfk_1`
FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) REFERENCES `jobs` (`advertiser_id`)
ON DELETE CASCADE;

Having said that, as others have already pointed out, your foreign key feels like it should go the other way around since the advertisers table really contains the primary key and the jobs table contains the foreign key. I would rewrite it like this:

ALTER TABLE `jobs`
ADD FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) REFERENCES `advertisers` (`advertiser_id`);

And the cascading delete won't be necessary.

  • 1
    Asaph, correct me if I am wrong, but won't there be multiple jobs per advertiser? – Rashmi Pandit Dec 15 '09 at 6:17
  • @Rashmi: You're correct – OMG Ponies Dec 15 '09 at 6:19
  • @Rashmi Pandit: I've added further discussion to my answer which addresses that point. – Asaph Dec 15 '09 at 6:21

If you want to drop a table you should execute the following query in a single step

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0; DROP TABLE table_name;

I think that your foreign key is backwards. Try:

ALTER TABLE 'jobs'
ADD CONSTRAINT `advertisers_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) REFERENCES `advertisers` (`advertiser_id`)

If there are more than one job having the same advertiser_id, then your foreign key should be:

ALTER TABLE `jobs`
ADD CONSTRAINT `advertisers_ibfk_1` 
FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) 
REFERENCES `advertisers` (`advertiser_id`);

Otherwise (if its the other way round in your case), if you want the rows in advertiser to be automatically deleted if the row in job is deleted add the 'ON DELETE CASCADE' option to your foreign key

ALTER TABLE `advertisers`
ADD CONSTRAINT `advertisers_ibfk_1` 
FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) 
REFERENCES `jobs` (`advertiser_id`);
ON DELETE CASCASE

Check out Foreign Key constraints

When you create database or create tables

You should add that line at top script create database or table

SET @OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@@FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS, FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1;

Now you want to delete records from table? then you write as

SET @OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@@FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS, FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=1;
DELETE FROM `jobs` WHERE `job_id` =1 LIMIT 1

Good luck!

I had this problem in laravel migration too
the order of drop tables in down() method does matter

Schema::dropIfExists('groups');
Schema::dropIfExists('contact');

may not work, but if you change the order, it works.

Schema::dropIfExists('contact');
Schema::dropIfExists('groups');

You need to delete it by order There are dependency in the tables

How about this alternative I've been using: allow the foreign key to be NULL and then choose ON DELETE SET NULL.

Personally I prefer using both "ON UPDATE CASCADE" as well as "ON DELETE SET NULL" to avoid unnecessary complications, but on your set up you may want a different approach. Also, NULL'ing foreign key values may latter lead complications as you won't know what exactly happened there. So this change should be in close relation to how your application code works.

Hope this helps.

Maybe you should try ON DELETE CASCADE

  • 27
    Blindly adding a cascading delete (which will destroy data) without understanding the problem is just about the worst thing that one could do. – Tom H Dec 15 '09 at 6:18

if you need to support client as soon as possible, and do not have access to

FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS

so that data integrity can be disabled:

1) delete foreign key

ALTER TABLE `advertisers` 
DROP FOREIGN KEY `advertisers_ibfk_1`;

2) activate your deleting operation thruogh sql or api

3) add the foreign key back to schema

ALTER TABLE `advertisers`
  ADD CONSTRAINT `advertisers_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`advertiser_id`) REFERENCES `jobs` (`advertiser_id`);

however, it is a hot-fix, so it is on your own risk, because the main flaw of such approach is that it is needed afterwards to keep the data integrity manually.

You could create a trigger to delete the referenced rows in before deleting the job.

    DELIMITER $$
    CREATE TRIGGER before_jobs_delete 
        BEFORE DELETE ON jobs
        FOR EACH ROW 
    BEGIN
        delete from advertisers where advertiser_id=OLD.advertiser_id;
    END$$
    DELIMITER ;

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