I know it's a weird question but I am locked into a third party vendor which launches a 32-bit cmd.exe on a target 64-bit Windows Server 2008 R2 clustered server. From here I want to launch a 64-bit PowerShell window and run a script.

Here's my test:

powershell.exe "Get-Module -ListAvailable| Where-Object {$_.name -eq 'FailoverClusters'}"

If I run this from a 32-bit cmd.exe I get nothing returned. If I run from a 64-bit cmd.exe I get:

ModuleType Name                      ExportedCommands
---------- ----                      ----------------
Manifest   FailoverClusters          {}

Any ideas on what I can do to invoke a 64-bit powershell script from a 32-bit cmd shell?

up vote 71 down vote accepted

syswow64 lets you run 32 bit system executables from 64 bit code. sysnative lets you run 64 bit system executables from 32 bit code.

So, you need to run:

%SystemRoot%\sysnative\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe

  • 1
    Just beat me to the punch. :-) – Keith Hill Sep 27 '13 at 16:44
  • 5
    I have Windows 7 Enterprise 64-bit and I get "The system cannot find the path specified" if I use this. So the line that works for me to run 64 bit powershell is this: %systemroot%\syswow64\windowspowershell\v1.0\powershell.exe – dotnetguy Jul 21 '14 at 8:40
  • 12
    @mishrud is mistaken. Calling %systemroot%\syswow64\windowspowershell\v1.0\powershell.exe from 32-bit cmd.exe gets you the 32-bit powershell. You can verify this using ls env: The 32-bit version will show PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE as x86 Moreover, syswow64 contains only 32-bit equivalents of 64-bit DLLs and EXEs. – Donal Lafferty Sep 25 '14 at 8:50
  • 9
    This answer no longer works under Windows 10. – Julian Knight Aug 4 '15 at 20:35
  • 3
    It works for me on Win10, but I noticed tab completion doesn't work on sysnative. – Jason Shirk Aug 5 '15 at 4:59

This script will check as see what version of powershell you are running and will relaunch itself to 64-bit if you are running in 32-bit. When the relaunch occurs it will also pass in any parameters used in the original call.

#############################################################################
#If Powershell is running the 32-bit version on a 64-bit machine, we 
#need to force powershell to run in 64-bit mode .
#############################################################################
if ($env:PROCESSOR_ARCHITEW6432 -eq "AMD64") {
    write-warning "Y'arg Matey, we're off to 64-bit land....."
    if ($myInvocation.Line) {
        &"$env:WINDIR\sysnative\windowspowershell\v1.0\powershell.exe" -NonInteractive -NoProfile $myInvocation.Line
    }else{
        &"$env:WINDIR\sysnative\windowspowershell\v1.0\powershell.exe" -NonInteractive -NoProfile -file "$($myInvocation.InvocationName)" $args
    }
exit $lastexitcode
}


write-host "Main script body"

#############################################################################
#End
#############################################################################    
  • You saved my bacon! I could not execute IIS powershell cmdlets through the config management tool SaltStack's powershell shell, and it turned out it was executing them in 32 bit (!!) and IIS required 64. Appending this to my scripts saved it. Very excellent. – Mr.Budris Jun 15 '17 at 14:44
  • Simple, elegant and it works , nice. – DaveBally Aug 5 '17 at 8:02

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